Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond
5.7K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
onto Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond
Scoop.it!

Seven Things the Competent Innovation Manager Should Know !

Seven Things the Competent Innovation Manager Should Know ! | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it

If you have recently been promoted -- or perhaps demoted -- to the position of innovation manager, your first action has probably been to do a bit of research. In so doing, you may understandably have been overwhelmed by the amount of information on-line, in books and peddled by over-priced consultants. Worse, a lot of that information is contradictory, uses unintelligible jargon or requires you hire an over-priced consultant !

Fouad Bendris's insight:

Fortunately, there is a simple solution to all of these issues: Communicate - Communicate  and Communicate!

Be sure that whatever innovation initiative you plan also includes a communications component. Not only will that make it clear to all what is happening, but it provides evidence of the hard work and effort you are putting into your organization's innovation initiative ...

more...
No comment yet.
Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond
Targeted to who wanted to keep up-to-date with M.I.T !
Curated by Fouad Bendris
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

Emmanuel Macron Q&A: France's President Discusses Artificial Intelligence Strategy

Emmanuel Macron Q&A: France's President Discusses Artificial Intelligence Strategy | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it

EM: I think artificial intelligence will disrupt all the different business models and it’s the next disruption to come. So I want to be part of it. Otherwise I will just be subjected to this disruption without creating jobs in this country. So that’s where we are. And there is a huge acceleration and as always the winner takes all in this field. So that’s why my first objective in terms of education, training, research, and the creation of startups is to streamline a lot of things, to have the adaptable systems, the adapted financing, the adapted regulations, in order to build champions here and to attract the existing champions.

Fouad Bendris's insight:
EMMANUEL Macron, the president of France, gave a speech laying out a new national strategy for artificial intelligence in his country. The French government will spend €1.5 billion ($1.85 billion) over five years to support research in the field, encourage startups, and collect data that can be used, and shared, by engineers. The goal is to start catching up to the US and China and to make sure the smartest minds in AI—hello Yann LeCun—choose Paris over Palo Alto. In an interview with WIRED, French President Emmanuel Macron describes his plans to enhance the country's AI efforts—and differentiate them from those in the US ! 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

People Don’t Want to Be Compared with Others in Performance Reviews. They Want to Be Compared with Themselves

People Don’t Want to Be Compared with Others in Performance Reviews. They Want to Be Compared with Themselves | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it

It feels more fair - Why are employees so frustrated about the way they are evaluated, despite all the time and money being spent on these evaluations? What are organizations missing? We believe that one clue lies in the fact that 71% of the American employees thought that their evaluations had problems in the domain of fairness. Fairness is at the heart of enhancing employees’ work experiences. It begets numerous benefits such as employees’ satisfaction with their jobs and commitment to their companies. In the context of performance evaluations, when people believe that the outcomes of their evaluations are commensurate with how well they performed, they are likely to consider the evaluations as fair. But there is so much more that goes into people’s perceptions of fairness. Specifically, employees perceive the fairness of evaluation processes when they feel included and respected. They also consider it fair when their evaluations are accurate and are conducted based on ethical and moral principles

Fouad Bendris's insight:
People hate performance evaluations. They really do. According to a survey of Fortune 1,000 companies done by the Corporate Executive Board (CEB), 66% of the employees were strongly dissatisfied with the performance evaluations they received in their organizations. More strikingly, 65% of the employees believed that performance evaluations were not even relevant to their jobs. This is unfortunate considering the amount of resources that organizations devote to conducting performance evaluations
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

Why Pi Matters !

Why Pi Matters ! | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it

Steven Strogatz discusses the importance of pi, an irrational number that is integral to our understanding of circles, cycles, and the fundamental mathematics of the universe.


What distinguishes pi from all other numbers is its connection to cycles. For those of us interested in the applications of mathematics to the real world, this makes pi indispensable. Whenever we think about rhythms—processes that repeat periodically, with a fixed tempo, like a pulsing heart or a planet orbiting the sun—we inevitably encounter pi. There it is in the formula for a Fourier series: That series is an all-encompassing representation of any process, x(t), that repeats every T units of time. The building blocks of the formula are pi and the sine and cosine functions from trigonometry.

Fouad Bendris's insight:
Pi does deserve a celebration, but for reasons that are rarely mentioned. In high school, we all learned that pi is about circles. Pi is the ratio of a circle’s circumference (the distance around the circle, represented by the letter C) to its diameter (the distance across the circle at its widest point, represented by the letter d). That ratio, which is about 3.14, also appears in the formula for the area inside the circle, A = πr2, where π is the Greek letter “pi” and r is the circle’s radius (the distance from center to rim). We memorized these and similar formulas for the S.A.T.s and then never again used them, unless we happened to go into a technical field, or until our own kids took geometry.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

How to Prevent the Digital Dark Ages ?

How to Prevent the Digital Dark Ages ? | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it
On January 24, 2018, during the 48th World Economic Forum Annual Meeting in Davos, Switzerland, business leaders from around the world convened to launch the formation of the Global Centre for Cybersecurity. The primary reason? To “prevent a digital dark age.” 

According to a press release on the event: 
-  Cyberattacks could cripple economies, nation states and society without collaboration and robust defenses 
- Urgent action is needed to create safe operating environments for new technologies like artificial intelligence, robotics, drones, self-driving cars and the internet of things 
- Forum’s new Global Centre for Cybersecurity offers the first platform for governments, companies and international organizations to diminish the impact of malicious activities on web 

The aim of this new centre is to establish the world’s first platform for governments, businesses, experts and law enforcement officials and agencies to congregate and collaborate on cybersecurity challenges.
Fouad Bendris's insight:
Courting the Digital Dark Ages The status quo is, unfortunately, somewhat dismal. In their attempt to show just how bad it is, the University of Illinois Chicago urges readers to “Just ask patients of Clay County Hospital. Last year, administrators of the small Illinois hospital received an email from a hacker who had hacked into their system, gained access to more than 12,000 patient records, and was now holding those records for ransom.” “This was hardly an isolated incident,” they continue. “The average person outside the health industry might be surprised to hear that healthcare organizations average one cyber attack per month. At least one in nine Americans have had their health records compromised in some way.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

Fishing for graphs in a Hadoop data lake !

Fishing for graphs in a Hadoop data lake ! | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it
This article targets data scientists, people doing data analytics, and indeed anybody who has access to large amounts of graph data and would like to get more insight out of it. We in the community believe that exploring these graphs very quickly, using many local queries with graph or multi-model databases, is eminently feasible and greatly enhances our toolboxes to gain insight into our data. Graph data and "graphy" queries Our tour through graph data land begins with a few examples of graphs in real-world data science.

To summarize, in this article we have discussed various types of graph queries, have considered the concept of the graph traversal class of algorithms, and have explored the idea that one can get greater value out of available graph data by importing it into a specialized graph database to tap into its capabilities to do local ad-hoc queries and thus considerably enhance and extend the analyst's arsenal. As an aside, the multi-model idea broadens the scope of this approach beyond mere graph applications and well into data analysis tools on arbitrary JSON data. 
Fouad Bendris's insight:
Exploring many small regions of a graph with low latency using specialized graph and multi-model databases ! 
Graphs in the sense of linked data with vertices and edges are everywhere these days: social networks, computer networks, and citations, to name but a few. And the data is generally big. Therefore, a lot of folks have huge amounts of data in graph format, typically sitting in some Hadoop file system as a table file for the vertices and a table file for the edges. At the same time, there are very good analytics tools available, such as Spark with GraphX and the more recent GraphFrames libraries. As a consequence, people are able to run large-scale graph analytics, and thus derive a lot of value out of the data they have. Spark is generally very well suited for such tasks—it offers a great deal of parallelism and makes good use of distributed resources.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

Should Data Scientists Adhere to a Hippocratic Oath?

Should Data Scientists Adhere to a Hippocratic Oath? | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it

As concerns mount over the uses of data, some in the field are trying to forge ethical guidelines.

Tech companies that make money by providing platforms for others can have additional reason not to be too prescriptive about ethics. Anything that could scare off customers from building on your platform is risky. Microsoft’s manifesto on AI and society discussed a Hippocratic Oath for coders, and an ethical review process for new uses of AI.

Ethical Boundaries:

- Keeping machine-learning systems within ethical bounds has become a hot topic in artificial-intelligence research. 

- Silicon Valley's most addictive products are built on psychology tips from one Stanford professor. 

- Facebook is trying to fix its fake news problem by asking users which publications they find trustworthy.



Fouad Bendris's insight:
THE TECH INDUSTRY is having a moment of reflection. Even Mark Zuckerberg and Tim Cook are talking openly about the downsides of software and algorithms mediating our lives. And while calls for regulation have been met with increased lobbying to block or shape any rules, some people around the industry are entertaining forms of self regulation. One idea swirling around: Should the programmers and data scientists massaging our data sign a kind of digital Hippocratic oath?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

Rewriting Nature ... 

Rewriting Nature ...  | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it

Why did the evolutionary theorist spend so long preparing to write his masterpiece, “On the Origin of Species”?

Darwin was not a writer just by inclination; he was, uniquely among the great scientists, an author by trade. His books, even some of the most technical ones, were published by a commercial publisher, and he was subject to the same trials as other writers: editors who cut too much, royalty statements that show too little. And Wilson’s collection, read right through, shows that Darwin really was one of the great natural English prose stylists. He wasn’t a “poet” in that vaguely humane sense of someone who has a nice way with an image; he was a man who knew how to cast his thesis into a succession of incidents, so that action and argument become one. And, as with all good writing, the traces of a lifetime’s struggles for sense and sanity remain on the page. Reading Darwin as a writer shows us a craftsman of enormous resource and a lot of quiet mischief ! 


Fouad Bendris's insight:
Rewriting Nature - Charles Darwin, natural novelist.
arwin’s Delay is by now nearly as famous as Hamlet’s, and involves a similar cast of characters: a family ghost, an unhappy lover, and a lot of men digging up old bones. Although it ends with vindication and fame, rather than with slaughter and self-knowledge, it was resolved by language, too—by inner soliloquy forcing itself out into the world, except that in this case the inner voice had the certainties and the outer one the hesitations ... 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

4 Things About #Innovation & #Creativity That We Can Still Learn From Albert Einstein ! 

4 Things About #Innovation & #Creativity That We Can Still Learn From Albert Einstein !  | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it
While the older Einstein - The early Einstein was a creative force who transformed how we see our universe. So don’t be fooled by the witty myth in the tattered sweater. Here are 4 lessons the real genius can still teach us ... 
1. Find A Good Problem As a boy, Einstein liked to imagine what it would be like to ride on a bolt of lightning. In many ways, it was a typical childhood fantasy
2. Innovation Is Hard Work One of the most misleading aspects of the Einstein myth is that it makes it seem as if brilliance came easy to Einstein
3. Create A Safe Space Einstein’s lack of early promise raises a question: How did an unexceptional young man turn the world on its head so suddenly?
4. Even A Genius Can Be Wildly Wrong Einstein rightly earned his place in history and is considered one of our greatest geniuses, but that doesn’t mean that he was always right


Fouad Bendris's insight:
When we think of Albert Einstein, we inevitably conjure up images of the icon rather than the man. We see Einstein with his wild hair and his tongue sticking out or Einstein as a playful old man, riding a bicycle. We remember his cheerful confidence and his easy comfort with his own genius. He wasn’t always that way. The younger Einstein, the one who actually came up with the ideas that established his place in history rather than the world famous scientist he became, was far different. Reeling from chronic unemployment and a troubled marriage, he was working as an obscure clerk in a patent office when he changed the world ... 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

Baba Shiv: Failure is the Mother of Innovation

Baba Shiv: Failure is the Mother of Innovation | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it

Startups may embrace the “fail-fast” mantra, but many leaders are risk-averse. And the only way to discover that is to try and fail and try again ! 

Organizations also tend to reward big breakthrough successes rather than smaller ones, but those game-changing innovations generally happen after, or in tandem with, the incremental ones. Shiv uses the example of Toyota, a company that encourages experimentation across its organization. “Most of those experiments result in incremental changes like improvements in production and manufacturing,” he says. “At the same time, however, the company invested in hybrid technology.”

One thing all companies can and should do is encourage a culture of innovation at all levels, the way Google has. “Small teams within Google run 3,000 to 5,000 experiments a year,” says Shiv. “A manager there might say, ‘We should use this course of action,’ and a new hire might say, ‘I think this way of doing it will be better.’ That manager’s first reaction isn’t resistance, it’s ‘OK, let’s test it.’ That’s the great thing about Google. There are no egos when it comes to opinions,” he says.

Fouad Bendris's insight:
Startups may embrace the “fail-fast” mantra, but many leaders are risk-averse. Invention has another mother: failure. It may seem counterintuitive, but repeated failures can, and often do, lead to success. Every time we try something new and fail, it provides valuable information about what went wrong and, as important, what went right. From that, we can make small changes and try again, continually learning and innovating. “If you’re trying to solve a problem there are potentially hundreds of possible pathways to take, but only a few are going to lead to the appropriate solution ! 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

The New Economic Benefits of Older Workers

The New Economic Benefits of Older Workers | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it

Many countries with aging populations are also experiencing growth in their gross domestic product. Could Your Workforce Benefit From Robotic Technologies? What should business leaders glean from these trends when it comes to business planning? The study results should offer additional incentives for investments in robotic technologies, short term, and also may provide broad insights into the dynamics of today’s global workforce demographics. Of course, each enterprise needs to examine its own unique labor and productivity needs, especially where international operations exist. In addition, the impact of technology on growth and labor are unfolding daily with every new app and innovation. While the nature of new technology has important implications for economic growth and the labor-market fortunes of workers, there is still great need for empirical evidence on the impact of automation and robotics on employment. ABOUT THE AUTHORS


Fouad Bendris's insight:
Demographics are shifting: The number of people globally age 65 and older will soon eclipse the number who are five years old and younger, according to recent U.S. Census Bureau data. This shift is being met with economic anxiety in many quarters, with theories that an aging population is a threat to economic prosperity. Some argue that an older workforce will be less productive, lacking the dynamic skills of younger workers. Others speculate that an older population will create an excess of savings over investment, leading to slow growth and secular stagnation. Others say that a wave of retirees is likely to take important skills out of the marketplace ! 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

How Are You Perceived at Work? Here’s an Exercise to Find Out

How Are You Perceived at Work? Here’s an Exercise to Find Out | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it

It only takes a couple well-worded questions to a few key people to get the information you need. (If you’ve ever conducted a 360 evaluation, you’ve seen how quickly impressions start repeating.) While this exercise won’t take a lot of time, it may be psychically intensive. So keep in mind that there’s never a comfortable time to do this and assume now is the exact right time.


- Select five people:  Choose colleagues who see you repeatedly in relevant work situations: bosses, executives, direct reports, peers, or even former colleagues. Influential co-workers who have their ears to the ground make great sources

- Ask for a face-to-face meeting. Be clear that you’ll keep whatever the person tells you confidential, which will encourage honesty, and that you’ll be collecting feedback from several people to find themes, which lessens the burden for any one individual


- Ask two questions. In the meeting, ask these two simple questions designed to tap into the collective wisdom: What’s the general perception of me? What could I do differently that would have the greatest impact on my success?

Fouad Bendris's insight:
It’s not easy to understand how other people perceive us. We are often uncertain, confused, or even completely unaware of what we project. And this lack of self-awareness can be career-limiting. Consider a former client of mine who was angling for the C-suite but had received feedback that his colleagues considered him negative and difficult. He was stunned; he thought of himself as analytical and thorough and assumed everyone understood that he pushed back in order to get to the best answer. He was also unaware that he had a habit of grimacing while processing information, which looked to others like annoyance !
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

All the buzz at AI’s big shindig

All the buzz at AI’s big shindig | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it

“CORPORATE conferences still suck.” So read the T-shirt sported by Ben Recht, a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, as he collected an award at the Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS) conference this week.

Yes, no and now, maybe Mr Smiroldo does put his finger on one of the main trends at this year’s NIPS: the merging of Bayesian statistics with deep learning. Instead of algorithms presenting deterministic “yes” or “no” results to queries, new systems are able to offer up more probabilistic inferences about the world. This is particularly useful for Mercedes-Benz, which needs driverless cars that can handle tricky situations. Instead of an algorithm simply determining if an object in the road is a pedestrian or a plastic bag, a system using Bayesian learning offers a more nuanced view that will allow AI systems to handle uncertainty better.


Fouad Bendris's insight:
NIPS began in 1987 as a humble little conference on an obscure branch of machine learning called neural networks.
Then, at the 2003 conference, Geoffrey Hinton, a British polymath, and a cabal of AI researchers founded the Neural Computation & Adaptive Perception (NCAP) working group. As a proponent of neural networks, Dr Hinton and the group helped accelerate the pace of research into a form of machine learning known as deep learning, leading to huge advances in image recognition in 2012. Deep learning, which stacks many neural networks on top of one another to learn the features of giant databases, now powers the image-processing operations of firms like Facebook and Google. 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

Break Your Worst Habit with Four Scientifically Proven Steps ! 

Break Your Worst Habit with Four Scientifically Proven Steps !  | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it
The answer begins with recognizing that change at any level requires at least some dose of refreshing and resetting the brain. The good news is that neuroscience now confirms that you can effectively and sustainably do just that with a few proven steps that center on thinking, because when you change the way you think, you actually (chemically) change the connections in your brain. Pointing the way is a successful non-drug behavior therapy developed by neuropsychiatrist Jeffrey Schwartz working with the UCLA School of Medicine for patients suffering from obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), which is perhaps the most locked up form of behavior. The method centers on a mindful thinking approach and entails four basic steps that result in a reset brain and changed behavior.
1. Relabel
2. Reattribute
3. Refocus
4. Revalue
Fouad Bendris's insight:
Making difficult changes is easier when you follow four simple steps Change is something everyone grapples with — whether it’s kicking a bad habit, coming up with new and original ideas, shifting a business focus, changing behaviors, changing company culture, or trying to change the world. Certainly the ability to create or manage change is a key issue for every business, because if you can’t get out in front of it, and even lead it, it may not be long before you’re at the back of the pack.
The question, of course, is how?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

Ten of the Greatest Inspirational Quotes Churchill Never Said (and Ten More That He Did) !

Ten of the Greatest Inspirational Quotes Churchill Never Said (and Ten More That He Did) ! | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it
Does that make the quotes less inspirational? Well, they still make for good office wall art and Facebook posts, but when it comes to attributing them, you might want to do more than use Google. Here are my 10 favorite faux-Churchill quotes and 10 authoritative ones. Keep them close at hand because sometimes it only takes a few words to give you the motivation to overcome the greatest challenges  ;()  

The Faux Quotes:
- "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.” 
- “Success is not final, failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts.” 
- “Continuous effort — not strength or intelligence — is the key to unlocking our potential.” 
- “Kites rise highest against the wind, not with it.” 
- “If you are going through hell, keep going.” 
- “For myself I am an optimist — it does not seem to be much use to be anything else.” 
- “Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm.” 
- “We shall not fail or falter; we shall not weaken or tire… And if we do, it shall be the enemy’s fault, not ours.” 
- “The empires of the future are the empires of the mind.” 
- “History will be kind to me for I intend to write it.” 

The Real Quotes: 
-  “I have not fear of the future. Let us go forward into its mysteries, let us tear aside the veils which hide it from our eyes, and let us move onward with confidence and courage.” 
- “This is the lesson: never give in, never give in, never, never, never, never — in nothing, great or small, large or petty — never give in except to convictions of honour and good sense. Never yield to force; never yield to the apparently overwhelming might of the enemy.” 
- “You ask what is our aim? I can answer in one word: Victory. Victory at all costs. Victory in spite of all terror. Victory however long and hard the road may be. For without victory there is no survival.” 
- “Today we may say aloud before an awe-struck world, ‘We are still masters of our fate. We still are captain of our souls.'” 
- “We have not journeyed across the centuries, across the oceans, across the mountains, across the prairies, because we are made of sugar candy.” 
- “Now this is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning.” 
- “We shape our buildings, and afterwards our buildings shape us.”
- “All will be well. We have, I believe, within us the life-strength and guiding light by which the tormented world around us may find the harbour of safety, after a storm-beaten voyage.” 
- “We have surmounted all the perils and endured all the agonies of the past. We shall provide against and thus prevail over the dangers and problems of the future…” 
- “My ability to be able to persuade my wife to marry me [was] quite my most brilliant achievement.”
Fouad Bendris's insight:
I love powerful quotes. Words can inspire entire societies to change and they act as mile markers for historical shifts. And few people have had the historical impact and amazingly eloquent quotability of Winston Churchill. Churchill could put into words the ethos, courage, and struggle of leadership in a way that has always provided me with inspiration and comfort during some of the most difficult periods of my professional and personal life. Well, at least that’s what I thought until I started doing some digging. In the age of the meme, Churchill is one of several historical figures (along with Abraham Lincoln and George Carlin) to whom we typically attribute quotes when we really have no idea who actually did say it first !
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

No Innovation Strategy Fits Every Problem, So You Need To Work With Full Toolbox ... 

No Innovation Strategy Fits Every Problem, So You Need To Work With Full Toolbox ...  | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it
It was with this in mind that I created the Innovation Matrix, the central framework featured in my book, to help leaders identify the right type strategy to solve the right type of problem.
- Sustaining Innovation: Most of the time, we’re trying to get better at what we’re already doing. We want to improve existing capabilities in existing markets and we have a pretty clear idea of what problems need to be solved and what skill domains are required to solve them.
- Breakthrough Innovation: Sometimes, as was the case with the example of designing a chip that could detect pollutants underwater described above, we run into a well defined problem that’s just devilishly hard to solve. In cases like these, we need to explore unconventional skill domains, such as adding a marine biologist to a team of chip designers. Open innovation innovation strategies can be highly effective in this regard.
- Disruptive Innovation: When Harvard Professor Clayton Christensen introduced the concept of disruptive innovation in his book, The Innovator’s Dilemma, it was a revelation. In his study of why good firms fail, he found that what is normally considered best practice — listening to customers, investing in continuous improvement and focusing on the bottom line — can be lethal in some situations.
- Basic Research: Pathbreaking innovations never arrive fully formed. They always begin with the discovery of some new phenomenon. No one could guess how Einstein’s discoveries would shape the world or that Alan Turing’s universal computer would someday become a real thing.
Fouad Bendris's insight:
When you have a really tough problem, it often helps to expand skill domains beyond specialists in a single field. These kinds of unlikely combinations that are key to coming up with elusive breakthroughs. In fact, in a study analyzing 17.9 million scientific papers researchers found that the most highly cited work tended to be mostly rooted within a traditional field, with just a smidgen of insight taken from some unconventional place. We need to start treating innovation like other business disciplines — as a set of tools that are designed to accomplish specific objectives. Just like we wouldn’t rely on a single marketing tactic for the life of an organization, or a single source of financing, we need to build up a portfolio of innovation strategies designed for specific tasks !
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

The Eight Pillars of Innovation ! 

The Eight Pillars of Innovation !  | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it
Here we outline eight pillars of innovation which will help businesses build their own effective and actionable innovation blueprint:
1. Missions, Visions & Goals Naturally, the first step of any business strategy must be to establish clear objectives. 
2. Challenges & Opportunity Briefs Crowdsourcing should be at the heart of an innovation strategy and will be one of the key drivers of idea generation and creativity.
3. Capturing Ideas ‘Unleashing the power of innovation’ One of the biggest barriers to successful innovation is an inability to capture ideas. 
4. Collaboration & Interaction An idea is just the starting point. Very few ideas are fully formed or perfect from the moment they are proposed; they need to be developed, criticised and improved.
5. Business Case & Curation A natural extension of the collaboration phases is the curation process. Only a handful of ideas will make it to the implementation stage so it is crucial that the right ideas are pushed forward.
6. Implementation & Execution You have the winning idea, you have the backing of fellow colleagues and you have the approval from top-level staff. Now it’s time for implementation.
7. Measure, Adapt, Refine & Fail Constant review and analysis throughout the implementation process is crucial. Adopting an agile approach is necessary to enable frequent review and readjustment where appropriate.
8. Reward & Recognise Even the most dedicated employee needs a little incentive. Afterall, we’re only human. Displaying recognition for the best ideas and supporting this acknowledgement with a reward is key to maintaining a workplace innovation culture in the long run ... 

Fouad Bendris's insight:
Recent years have seen the unprecedented progression of digital advances, with artificial intelligence and virtual reality making the stuff of science fiction movies not quite as unrealistic as previously thought. Combine this with a new generation of employees and consumers harbouring fresh expectations and it is easy to understand why innovation is enjoying a renewed sense of necessity and urgency. Innovation can seem like a bit of a minefield and it can be difficult to know where to begin when there is so much to consider.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

Are you crazy enough to think you can change the world? 

Are you crazy enough to think you can change the world?  | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it
Quit that well paid job in Google where you are just a small cog in a big machine. Pass up that sweet opportunity at Facebook where you’ll be just another engineer optimising ads. Don’t drink their cool aid or fall for their bullshit. Be a man my son! Make one heap of all your winnings and risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss. Fill the unforgiving minute with sixty seconds’ worth of distance run. Take the road less traveled. I did and it has made all the difference.

Purpose is to simply say that if you are one of the ones who are crazy enough to think you can change the world then you are one of the ones who will. Go for it!

Thanks to Charles Wiles is the founder of Zzish ! @CharlesWiles ;() 
Fouad Bendris's insight:
Back in 1997 some of you reading this were not even born, but Steve Jobs had just returned to Apple. It was 12 years since he had been fired from the company he had created with Steve Wozniak in 1976. At that point, one of the greatest marketing campaigns in the history of technology was launched, “Think different”. I made my kids watch it the other day, as it’s a work of genius, a campaign that goes to the heart of values and answering the simple question of “Why are we doing this?” You can watch the ad that he created along on YouTube, but it’s also shown at the end of this slightly longer video, that is a masterclass in marketing strategy.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

Understanding 25 Cognitive Biases That Impact Business  !

Understanding 25 Cognitive Biases That Impact Business  ! | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it

The best way to combat a cognitive bias is to have awareness of its existence and how you or those around you will react to certain informational stimuli. In business, these cognitive biases can actually work in your favor as you provide people with justification for their shopping decisions. Implementing the various pricing strategies, unique and retargeted advertising campaigns, and leadership styles outlined in the visual below can help you unleash the power of human psychology in your business:


Fouad Bendris's insight:
What is Cognitive Bias and How Does it Impact Business Performance? The intricacies of human psychology are made evident through these glitches in perception, otherwise known as cognitive biases. A cognitive bias is the distortion of reality through irrational discernment of the information being received. Cognitive biases span the spectrum from seemingly harmless to truly detrimental. For example, the IKEA effect is when someone places a higher value on something they have spent time and effort to build, which may not be a surprise. But when you consider how many people have lost everything because of the irrational escalation bias, you start to realize how dangerous these skewed perceptions can be.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

When You Have to Carry Out a Decision You Disagree With

When You Have to Carry Out a Decision You Disagree With | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it

Sometimes you have to keep your opinions to yourself.

To convince yourself of the decision, put yourself in the shoes of someone who believes deeply in the decision that was made. Ask yourself why someone would make this choice. Look for factors you may not have considered before that would make this option a good one. While you’re at it, also be explicit about all of your objections. Those will be useful as well. Once you’ve wrapped your head around why this decision was reasonable, you’re ready to start working with your team to carry out the new plan.When you move up in the organization, you are likely to make decisions that fly in the face of what some of the people believe is right. You want them to treat your choices with enough respect to give them the best chance to succeed ... 


Fouad Bendris's insight:
One of the great frustrations of being a middle manager is that senior leaders make decisions that go against what you would have done had it been up to you. Sometimes you are part of the decision process, and other times the decision is simply handed down. Either way, you are now responsible for ensuring that the plan is carried out. Resist that temptation. Your job is to help your organization succeed. You won’t be fulfilling that role if you — intentionally or unintentionally — undermine the decision. Instead, start by asking yourself whether you trust the organization you work for. If — deep down — you don’t feel that senior management makes good decisions, it’s probably time to start looking for another job ! 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

The Question with AI Isn’t Whether We’ll Lose Our Jobs — It’s How Much We’ll Get Paid

The Question with AI Isn’t Whether We’ll Lose Our Jobs — It’s How Much We’ll Get Paid | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it

However, the expansion of what can be automated in recent years has raised the question: Is this time different? It doesn’t have to be. Yes, there are reasons for concern, both technical and political. Machines are now able to take on less-routine tasks, and this transition is occurring during an era in which many workers are already struggling. Nonetheless, with the right policies we can get the best of both worlds: automation without rampant unemployment.

- Is This Time Different?

With robotics, artificial intelligence, and machine learning, what we call automation seems poised to take on a greater share of high-productivity jobs and a range of tasks that were previously the domain of humans

- Will Robots Take All the Jobs?

Currently, most automation involves routine, structured, predictable physical activities and the collection and processing of data. Generally, these tasks form the basis of occupations in manufacturing, professional and business services, food service, and retail trade. Looking ahead, these tasks will continue to have the highest potential for advanced automation

- What We Can Do ? 

Education and training are at the top of the list. Human capital investment must be at the center of any strategy for producing skills that are complementary to technology. The current workforce — including the unemployed — needs opportunities for re-skilling and up-skilling, with businesses taking an active role both in determining the skills needed and in providing the skill training ... 


Fouad Bendris's insight:
The fear that machines will replace human labor is a durable one in the public mind, from the time of the Luddites in the early 19th century. Yet most economists have viewed “the end of humans in jobs” as a groundless fear, inconsistent with the evidence. The standard view of technical change is that some jobs are displaced by the substitution of machines for labor, but that the fear of total displacement is misplaced because new jobs are created, largely due to the technology-fueled increase in productivity. Humans have always shifted away from work suitable for machines and to other jobs. This was true in the 1930s, when the shift was away from agriculture, through the 1990s and early 2000s, when the shift was largely out of manufacturing.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

IOTA – The potential to drive Data Science for IoT!

IOTA – The potential to drive Data Science for IoT! | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it
What is the implication of IOTA for Data Science for IoT The ability to manage and share data securely has profound implications for next generation IoT applications such as self driving cars, Drones etc. Such devices would need to collaborate within peers. A leasing model for devices could arise instead of an ownership model. That leasing/ collaboration model could also extend to data arising from IoT devices. Furthermore, interaction between devices can happen autonomously. IOTA could thus be the backbone for IoT applications. If “Data is the next Oil” makes you cringe .. this is for you The term ‘Data is the next Oil’ often makes me cringe .. because it’s your data and their Oil! But for a long time, there was not much you could do about it. At least for sensor data, IOTA offers a potentally disruptive way out and yet help to foster an ecosystem ... 
Fouad Bendris's insight:
What problem does IOTA solve and why does that matter If all IOTA created was a ‘better blockchain’ It would be interesting but not disruptive. But IOTA can be really disruptive with IoT. For example, an IoT sensor in a car could retrieve data from the factory automatically. IoT devices can connect and transact with each other in a peer to peer mode. Potentially, it could help 50 billion devices to connect. IOTA is getting traction(despite some recent hiccups). The IOTA Foundation announced that Robert Bosch Venture Capital GmbH (RBVC) — the corporate venture capital company of the Bosch Group — has purchased a significant number of IOTA tokens. Dr. Hongquan Jiang, partner at RBVC, will also join the IOTA Foundation’s advisory board. The core feature of IOTA is the ability ford devices to transfer data through the Tangle. With recent extensions to the Core, IOTA can even operate in ‘one to many’ mode i.e. the ability to broadcast messages to devices.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

3 Simple Steps to Silencing Your Inner Critic !

3 Simple Steps to Silencing Your Inner Critic ! | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it
n the context of thinking and solving business problems, the challenge is that our perception of threat and response to stress becomes so ingrained and so reflexive, so mindless, that our avoidance tactics automatically prevent new experiences which may have some truly rewarding payoffs. When we’re self-critical, we self-censor, and don’t even give these experiences a chance.
Finally, you will notice that you have not only injected a new and better perspective, but you have reduced your stress, deferred self-judgment, and thus and opened yourself up to a new and potentially rewarding experience. As Einstein once wrote, “Genius is not that you are smarter than everyone else. It is that you are ready to receive the inspiration.” While we may never eliminate our inner critic — and we would never want to — we can certainly learn to silence it when it goes so far as to stifle our creativity.
Fouad Bendris's insight:
Neuroscience explains it, but psychology offers the fix !
During a recent creative strategy session, I witnessed what psychologist Carl Jung referred to over a century ago as “an inner critic or judge who immediately comments on everything.” I had given a team of young executives a thought challenge as a right-brain warmup exercise. Although they were unsuccessful in landing on the elegant solution within the time allotted, one individual pulled me aside during the session break to tell me, rather sheepishly, that the solution had immediately popped into her head, but she hadn’t raised it with the group.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

The Most-read WIRED Business Stories of 2017

The Most-read WIRED Business Stories of 2017 | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it

The future of jobs weighed heavy on everyone's minds.

People seem to be equally concerned with how social media is retraining human brains and upending social norms. They're curious to know how artificial intelligence will evolve. And they're fascinated by what Big Data means for society at large. It's been a tectonic year for the business of tech, and that is certainly reflected below in our list of WIRED's 17 most-read business stories of the year ... 

Fouad Bendris's insight:
LOOKING BACK AT the year's most-read WIRED business stories, one theme clearly emerges: people are very concerned with the future of work. Will the robot revolution will eradicate positions? (It's more complicated than that.) What are the right skills for future-proofing ourselves? (Learn code.) Could implementing a universal basic income really work? 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

It’s Mesos’ SMACK Stack versus Kubernetes’ Smart Clusters for Hosting Spark - The New Stack

It’s Mesos’ SMACK Stack versus Kubernetes’ Smart Clusters for Hosting Spark - The New Stack | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it
Would this goal require Kubernetes to run any special configuration? No, says Pepperdata’s Sucher. “Part of the beauty — and this is impressive about Kubernetes — that we encountered when we implemented native Spark support on Kubernetes, was that the primitives Kubernetes gave us were rich enough to allow these big data, highly parallel, highly resource-aggressive applications to co-exist with other services that were not big data, and were not aware of these Spark containers or their semantics at all — on the same cluster, without modifying Kubernetes or those other applications.” Has Pepperdata accounted for the growing popularity of co-processing hardware, such as FPGA accelerators and general-purpose GPUs (GPGPU), which utilize parallelization uniquely? Suchter could not respond with respect to Kubernetes on Spark. But with respect to his company’s existing release editions of its database optimizers for YARN, they already monitor how parallel data jobs run on various hardware configurations, including with accelerators. 
Fouad Bendris's insight:
It seemed like a very convincing argument made by more than one proponent during the last MesosCon 2017 conference in Los Angeles: Apache Mesos, they said, was better suited to running the Apache Spark streaming data engine at large scale, than any other orchestrator. Some said Mesos was better suited to delivering a framework capable of running Spark’s parallel tasks. But nearly without deviation, they said that Mesos’ capability to manage workloads across multiple infrastructure profiles gave it the edge.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fouad Bendris
Scoop.it!

The Impenetrable Program Transforming How Courts Treat DNA Evidence !

The Impenetrable Program Transforming How Courts Treat DNA Evidence ! | Management - Innovation -Technology and beyond | Scoop.it

A legal battle is trying to expose the inner workings of TrueAllele, game-changing software that attempts to identify criminals based on subtle traces of DNA.

In this climate, DNA evidence has been a modern miracle. DNA remains the gold standard for solving crimes, bolstered by academics, verified scientific studies, and experts around the world. Since the advent of DNA testing, nearly 200 people have been exonerated using newly tested evidence; in some places, courts will only consider exonerations with DNA evidence. Juries, too, have become more trusting of DNA, a response known popularly as the “CSI Effect.” A number of studies suggest that the presence of DNA evidence increases the likelihood of conviction or a plea agreement.


Fouad Bendris's insight:
As technology progresses forward, the law lags behind. As John Oliver commented last month, law enforcement and lawyers rarely understand the science behind detective work. Over the years, various types of “junk science” have been discredited. Arson burn patterns, bite marks, hair analysis, and even fingerprints have all been found to be more inaccurate than previously thought. A September 2016 report by President Obama’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology found that many of the common techniques law enforcement historically rely on lack common standards.
more...
No comment yet.