fotografía
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The illusion of life

The 12 basic principles of animation were developed by the 'old men' of Walt Disney Studios, amongst them Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston, during the 1930s. Of course…
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La fanática puñalada contra la cultura

La fanática puñalada contra la cultura | fotografía | Scoop.it
Joan Fontcuberta reflexiona en Deletrix’ sobre la censura, la imagen y la libertad de expresión en manuscritos del siglo en la literatura, la filosofía y la música
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Fontcuberta y su trabajo en museos. 

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Nociones básicas de fotografía

Nociones básicas de fotografía | fotografía | Scoop.it
En vista de las dudas que surgen ultimamente en cuanto a las nociones básicas de fotografía, he escrito este humilde post en que creo que quedan
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Blog de Canonistas.com NOciones Básicas
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Desoladoras fotografías retratan la guerra a través de juguetes infantiles (FOTOS)

Desoladoras fotografías retratan la guerra a través de juguetes infantiles (FOTOS) | fotografía | Scoop.it
Los juguetes nos enseñan a entender el mundo... pero no solamente cuando somos niños.
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Fotografias de miniaturas.
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Group f/64 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Group f/64 was a group of seven 20th century San Francisco photographers who shared a common photographic style characterized by sharp-focused and carefully framed images seen through a particularly Western (U.S.) viewpoint. In part, they formed in opposition to the Pictorialist photographic style that had dominated much of the early 20th century, but moreover they wanted to promote a new Modernist aesthetic that was based on precisely exposed images of natural forms and found objects.[1]

The late 1920s and early 1930s were a time of substantial social and economic unrest in the United States.[2] The United States was suffering through the Great Depression, and people were seeking some respite from their everyday hardships. The American West was seen as the base for future economic recovery because of massive public works projects like the Hoover Dam.[3] The public sought out news and images of the West because it represented a land of hope in an otherwise bleak time. They were increasingly attracted to the work of such photographers as Ansel Adams, whose strikingly detailed photographs of the American West were seen as "pictorial testimony…of inspiration and redemptive power."[1]

At the same time, workers throughout the country were beginning to organize for better wages and working conditions. There was a growing movement among the economically oppressed to band together for solidarity and bargaining strength, and photographers were directly participating in these activities. Shortly before Group f/64 was formed, Edward Weston went to a meeting of the John Reed Club, which was founded to support Marxist artists and writers.[4] These circumstances not only helped set up the situation in which a group of like-minded friends decided to come together around a common interest, but they played a significant role in how they thought about their effort. Group f/64 was more than a club of artists; they described themselves as engaged in a battle against a "tide of oppressive pictorialism" and purposely called their defining proclamation a manifesto, with all the political overtones that the name implies.[4]

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