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Rescooped by Jonathan Doyle from Knowmads, Infocology of the future
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Explainer: how the latest earphones translate languages

In the Hitchhiker’s Guide to The Galaxy, Douglas Adams’s seminal 1978 BBC broadcast (then book, feature film and now cultural icon), one of the many technology predictions was the Babel Fish. This tiny yellow life-form, inserted into the human ear and fed by brain energy, was able to translate to and from any language.

Web giant Google have now seemingly developed their own version of the Babel Fish, called Pixel Buds. These wireless earbuds make use of Google Assistant, a smart application which can speak to, understand and assist the wearer. One of the headline abilities is support for Google Translate which is said to be able to translate up to 40 different languages. Impressive technology for under US$200.

So how does it work?

Real-time speech translation consists of a chain of several distinct technologies – each of which have experienced rapid degrees of improvement over recent years. The chain, from input to output, goes like this:

Input conditioning: the earbuds pick up background noise and interference, effectively recording a mixture of the users’ voice and other sounds. “Denoising” removes background sounds while a voice activity detector (VAD) is used to turn the system on only when the correct person is speaking (and not someone standing behind you in a queue saying “OK Google” very loudly). Touch control is used to improve the VAD accuracy.

Language identification (LID): this system uses machine learning to identify what language is being spoken within a couple of seconds. This is important because everything that follows is language specific. For language identification, phonetic characteristics alone are insufficient to distinguish languages (languages pairs like Ukrainian and Russian, Urdu and Hindi are virtually identical in their units of sound, or “phonemes”), so completely new acoustic representations had to be developed.

Automatic speech recognition (ASR): ASR uses an acoustic model to convert the recorded speech into a string of phonemes and then language modelling is used to convert the phonetic information into words. By using the rules of spoken grammar, context, probability and a pronunciation dictionary, ASR systems fill in gaps of missing information and correct mistakenly recognised phonemes to infer a textual representation of what the speaker said.

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Saving the world with online games

Saving the world with online games | Foreign Language Education | Scoop.it
Could online games be the solution to the world’s biggest problems? According to University of Waikato Senior Lecturer Dianne Forbes, they might be.

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'Fed up with fantasies for male teenagers': fixing the depiction of women in games

'Fed up with fantasies for male teenagers': fixing the depiction of women in games | Foreign Language Education | Scoop.it
Developers and video artists are beginning to break down cliche and sexist gender stereotypes to explore new ideas and storylines

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(15) English Learning via Alphabear - YouTube

Spry Fox CEO David Edery discusses word puzzle game "Alphabear" and its anticipated sequel, supported by the US Department of Education. Edery discusses why Spry Fox decided to focus its educational ambitions on the Alphabear IP, explain the studio's prototyping process and share the features that have been prototyped thus far, and share the studio's future plans for Alphabear.

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Kim Flintoff's curator insight, October 26, 2017 6:40 PM
Spry Fox CEO David Edery discusses word puzzle game "Alphabear" and its anticipated sequel, supported by the US Department of Education. Edery discusses why Spry Fox decided to focus its educational ambitions on the Alphabear IP, explain the studio's prototyping process and share the features that have been prototyped thus far, and share the studio's future plans for Alphabear.
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PODCAST: Why Video Games Should Be Assigned In Classrooms

PODCAST: Why Video Games Should Be Assigned In Classrooms | Foreign Language Education | Scoop.it
What if instead of watching a film to start a new course in high school, you played a video game? And not just edutainment games like Mario is Missing!

Satchell Drakes and I talk about "tangential learning" -- the idea of being inspired to self-educate about a subject through a familiar medium you already enjoy. To help explore the concept, the two talk to Jared Bauer, the co-creator of the YouTube channel, Wisecrack. His videos function as tongue-in-cheek SparkNotes; the themes of shows like Rick and Morty and South Park are dissected as if they were the assigned reading in a semester of high school English, while literary classics like The Great Gatsby are made digestible through the comedic alter ego Sparky Sweets, PhD in the series Thug Notes.

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Kim Flintoff's curator insight, November 8, 2017 9:44 AM

What if instead of watching a film to start a new course in high school, you played a video game? And not just edutainment games like Mario is Missing!

 

Satchell Drakes and I talk about "tangential learning" -- the idea of being inspired to self-educate about a subject through a familiar medium you already enjoy. To help explore the concept, the two talk to Jared Bauer, the co-creator of the YouTube channel, Wisecrack. His videos function as tongue-in-cheek SparkNotes; the themes of shows like Rick and Morty and South Park are dissected as if they were the assigned reading in a semester of high school English, while literary classics like The Great Gatsby are made digestible through the comedic alter ego Sparky Sweets, PhD in the series Thug Notes.

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Gaming to Learn: Research Meets Classroom Practice

Gaming to Learn: Research Meets Classroom Practice | Foreign Language Education | Scoop.it
A blog about 21st Century Learning. Dr. Z shares ideas, strategies, and tech for engaging learners. He writes for educators who make a difference.

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Kim Flintoff's curator insight, November 8, 2017 4:17 PM
A blog about 21st Century Learning. Dr. Z shares ideas, strategies, and tech for engaging learners. He writes for educators who make a difference.
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What Students Remember Most About Teachers

What Students Remember Most About Teachers | Foreign Language Education | Scoop.it

Image is from Mindshift post on FB.

Dear Young Teacher Down the Hall,I saw you as you rushed passed me in the lunch room. Urgent. In a hurry to catch a bite before the final bell would ring calling all the students back inside.


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Kathy Lynch's curator insight, September 12, 2017 10:00 PM
So true and easy to forget amidst the alphabet of demands.
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How to Destroy Creativity and Innovation

How to Destroy Creativity and Innovation | Foreign Language Education | Scoop.it
Creativity and innovation are the lifeblood of every organization. This poster describes 13 ways that creativity and innovation are destroyed every day.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=innovation

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Creativity

 

- http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Sir+Ken+Robinson

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Frank+SONNENBERG

 


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Jonathan Doyle's insight:
Creativity and innovation are the lifeblood of every organization. This poster describes 13 ways that creativity and innovation are destroyed every day.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=innovation

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Creativity

 

- http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Sir+Ken+Robinson

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Frank+SONNENBERG

 

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Steve Wilhite's curator insight, April 2, 2016 3:00 AM
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Silvia Nascimento's curator insight, April 4, 2016 8:21 PM
Creativity and innovation are the lifeblood of every organization. This poster describes 13 ways that creativity and innovation are destroyed every day.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=innovation

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Creativity

 

- http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Sir+Ken+Robinson

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Frank+SONNENBERG

 

Felix Val's curator insight, April 5, 2016 3:21 AM
Creativity and innovation are the lifeblood of every organization. This poster describes 13 ways that creativity and innovation are destroyed every day.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=innovation

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Creativity

 

- http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Sir+Ken+Robinson

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Frank+SONNENBERG

 

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Versailles 3D. Une decouverte interactive du chateau de Versailles.

Versailles 3D. Une decouverte interactive du chateau de Versailles. | Foreign Language Education | Scoop.it
Versailles 3D est un projet multimédia complet pour découvrir l'histoire du célèbre château de Versailles. Versailles 3D est un bon exemple de ce que les t

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Silvia Martinelli's curator insight, February 12, 2016 1:01 PM

Muy bello para observar el palacio y las posibilidades 3D

Ms Buffard's comment, February 13, 2016 3:20 AM
needs Chrome. Great address, thanks!
Armando's curator insight, February 13, 2016 6:03 AM

Versailles 3D. Une decouverte interactive du chateau de Versailles.

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You Don't Know as Much as You Think: False Expertise

You Don't Know as Much as You Think: False Expertise | Foreign Language Education | Scoop.it
It is only logical to trust our instincts if we think we know a lot about a subject, right? New research suggests the opposite: self-proclaimed experts are more likely to fall victim to a phenomenon known as overclaiming, professing to know things they really do not.

People overclaim for a host of reasons, including a desire to influence others' opinions—when people think they are being judged, they will try to appear smarter. Yet sometimes overclaiming is not deliberate; rather it is an honest overestimation of knowledge.

In a series of experiments published in July in Psychological Science, researchers at Cornell University tested people's likelihood to overclaim in a variety of scenarios. In the first two experiments, participants rated how knowledgeable they believed themselves to be about a variety of topics, then rated how well they knew each of 15 terms, three of which were fake. The more knowledgeable people rated themselves to be on a particular topic, the more likely they were to claim knowledge of the fake terms in that field. In a third experiment, additional participants took the same tests, but half were warned that some terms would be fake. The warning reduced overclaiming in general but did not change the positive correlation between self-perceived knowledge and overclaiming.

In a final experiment, the researchers manipulated participants' self-perceived knowledge by giving one group a difficult geography quiz, one group an easy quiz and one group no quiz. Participants who took the easy quiz then rated themselves as knowing more about geography than did participants in the other groups and consequently were more likely to overclaim knowledge of fake terms on a subsequent test.

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Why are games good for learning

Why are games good for learning | Foreign Language Education | Scoop.it

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callooh's curator insight, April 24, 2015 2:26 PM

A good info graphic on the benefits of the potential  benefits of games when designed well.

Jerome Leleu's curator insight, April 27, 2015 3:13 AM

ajouter votre aperçu ...

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44 Diverse Tools To Publish Student Work

44 Diverse Tools To Publish Student Work | Foreign Language Education | Scoop.it
44 Diverse Tools To Publish Student Work

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cherimacleod's curator insight, June 14, 2015 1:09 AM

Tools tools tools

Julie Lindsay's curator insight, June 14, 2015 5:37 PM

Tony Vincent - Learning in Hand - always provides excellent resources for classrooms.

James I.'s curator insight, June 16, 2015 9:43 PM

Love the fact that this infographic focuses both on the web and mobile possibilities.

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Ed Games Need To Fill in Assessment Gaps To Be Fully Useful -- THE Journal

Ed Games Need To Fill in Assessment Gaps To Be Fully Useful -- THE Journal | Foreign Language Education | Scoop.it
A joint study on game-playing in K-12 has found that educational game developers could improve the learning impact by making a few changes.

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Google's translation headphones: you can order a meal but they won't help you understand the culture

Google's translation headphones: you can order a meal but they won't help you understand the culture | Foreign Language Education | Scoop.it
Language learning will be vital for the future of the UK economy in a post Brexit world. This is in part why employers are desperately looking for graduates with language skills – and, more importantly, intercultural awareness and empathy.

According to a CBI Pearson Education Survey 58% of employers are dissatisfied with school leavers’ language skills. The survey also found that 55% of employers would like to see improvements in students’ intercultural awareness.

Similarly, the British Chamber of Commerce’s 2013 Survey of International Trade states that a large majority of non-exporters cite language and cultural factors as barriers to success.

It may sound like good news then that Google has just released an AI-powered translation earbud, with claims it will instantly translate between 40 different languages using a Pixel smartphone.

A wireless connection to the ear buds allows the user to translate to and from different languages in real time. In the live demo Google showed how the ear bud can translate short phrases –one of the major benefits is said to be: “now you can order your meals like a pro”. In Google’s imagination their software increases intercultural communication and gets rid of language barriers. So will this spell the end of language learning as we know it? Probably not.

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Learning From Games – Games Beyond Stereotypes #01Firewatch

Learning From Games – Games Beyond Stereotypes #01Firewatch | Foreign Language Education | Scoop.it
I still remember the first time the concept of game-based learning was introduced to our learning design team at the office. Some of them were excited while some kept their distance from the discussion calling it silly. The ones who kept their distance are the ones who had a standard picture of video games in their minds (shoot, run, jump, race, fight, win) and hence couldn’t see a lot of inspiration coming in there in terms of design thinking and user experience.

The fact here is that even the ones that are excited have the same picture in mind. So what were these guys visualizing? That the learners will walk around shooting a bunch of guys whiles answering the questions? Or that they’ll be racing through different modules in the course? Neither of it makes sense.

In this blog post series, we’ll take a look at some games that are beyond the stereotypes. We’ll see what makes them special in terms of engaging the players as well as creating a meaningful play without having many attributes of a standard AAA title.

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Kim Flintoff's curator insight, October 24, 2017 7:35 PM
In this blog post series, we’ll take a look at some games that are beyond the stereotypes. We’ll see what makes them special in terms of engaging the players as well as creating a meaningful play without having many attributes of a standard AAA title.
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Study Results: Serious Games As Digital Health Interventions

Study Results: Serious Games As Digital Health Interventions | Foreign Language Education | Scoop.it
 play2PREVENT Lab Study’s results published early September 2017 in the Journal of Medical Internet Research showed that PlayForward “Serious Game” was effective in improving positive attitudes about sexual health among adolescents

Following my previous post Jesse Schell On Serious Games @ Serious Play 2013, which covered PlayForward: Elm City Stories as a gold medal winner in the Healthcare/Medical category of the International Serious Play Awards, the Yale News has recently reported that “video games might soon have a place in classrooms as tools to help educate adolescents about public health issues.” 

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Kim Flintoff's curator insight, October 25, 2017 9:29 PM
play2PREVENT Lab Study’s results published early September 2017 in the Journal of Medical Internet Research showed that PlayForward “Serious Game” was effective in improving positive attitudes about sexual health among adolescents
Richard Platt's curator insight, October 28, 2017 12:25 PM

With the value proposition of “harnessing videogame technology to shape stronger and healthier lives”, seven years ago Lynn Fiellin MED ’96, founder and director of the play2PREVENT Lab at the Yale Center for Health & Learning Games, received funding from the National Institutes of Health to study how video games might effectively combat public health issues among New Haven youth.   Play2PREVENT’s inaugural video game was PlayForward: Elm City Stories. Yale’s p2P initiative has partnered with Schell Games and Digitalmill to develop the game for the iPad, aimed at preventing HIV infection among ethnic minority adolescents. PlayForward is a serious role-playing videogame that engages youth with a variety of challenges and choices in fictional yet realistic life situations.  Led by Fiellin, the research team recruited more than 300 students, ages 11 to 14, from afterschool and summer programs in the New Haven area for the study.  During the one-year study period, the students were assessed for a range of outcomes, including sexual health attitudes, knowledge, intention to initiate sex, and sexual activity.  The findings validate the value of the Serious Game as a tool to engage and educate teens at risk for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

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(15) The Secret Process for Making Games that Matter - YouTube

Jesse Schell, author of The Art of Game Design, and Barbara Chamberlin, head of the Learning Games Lab, are collaborating on a project to find best practices for creating educational and transformational games. In this talk they describe what they have discovered about translating how players need to change into games they love to play.

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Kim Flintoff's curator insight, October 26, 2017 6:43 PM
Jesse Schell, author of The Art of Game Design, and Barbara Chamberlin, head of the Learning Games Lab, are collaborating on a project to find best practices for creating educational and transformational games. In this talk they describe what they have discovered about translating how players need to change into games they love to play.
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Game design fosters real learning

Game design fosters real learning | Foreign Language Education | Scoop.it
The 2017 Australian STEM Video Game Challenge, which encourages students as young as 10 years old to design and build a video game, turns classroom learning into a reality.

Six winning teams in the 2017 Australian STEM Video Game Challenge were recognised at an awards ceremony at PAX Australia in Melbourne in late October. Presenting the awards, Stephanie 'Hex' Bendixsen (presenter of Seven’s screenPLAY and former presenter of ABC’s Good Game) commended not only the winners, but all students who created a playable game.

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Kim Flintoff's curator insight, November 6, 2017 8:01 AM
And the winners are…

Years 5-8 Scratch – Marcus Carr, Bert Lee, Jayden Shi and Eric Shin, Chatswood Public School, NSW, for Asteroid Smash!

Years 5-8 Gamemaker – Jaxson Brown, Australind Senior High School, WA, for Cube Runner

Years 5-8 Open – Michael Ostapenko, home school, QLD, for Reaction

Years 9-12 Gamemaker – Jett-Lee Wetherald, Mason Brennan and John Saxon, Maroochydore State High School, QLD, for Shards of Azothornia: The First Shard

Years 9-12 Unity3D/Unreal Engine – Kye Ziebarth, Fabian Scheffler and Kenji McAuliffe, Churchlands Senior High School, WA for Goldberg

Years 9-12 Open – Jacob Thomas, Dylan Kalms-Taylor, Caleb Jeanes and Chloe Godfrey, Kalianna School, Bendigo, VIC, for Gizma’s Adventure

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Gamification in the Classroom: Beyond Badges

Gamification in the Classroom: Beyond Badges | Foreign Language Education | Scoop.it
Kathy Sierra recommends that educators “Try to find what is inherently interesting in a subject and exploit that.”

So what’s my take on it?

Concept: It has to begin with a strong narrative and experiential structure, bringing the player on an amazing and downright addictive journey.

More than one life and level up: There’s a reason why most video games give you more than one life. Progressing through the game is intrinsically a learning process in itself. Many of the best games also create a reason to keep coming back to the game by making your character level up (often changing appearance) as you progress through the game.

Multiplayer rocks: Ever since the first Daytona arcade machines actually allowed you to race side by side with your friends, the multiplayer experience has been an integral part of many (especially online) games. Sharing a multiplayer experience with your friends provides something to talk/laugh about and solidifies a shared, collective bond. Some of the most popular (particularly mobile device based) games allow players to trade, buy or sell items relevant to progressing in the game.

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Kim Flintoff's curator insight, November 9, 2017 5:08 PM
Kathy Sierra recommends that educators “Try to find what is inherently interesting in a subject and exploit that.” 

So what’s my take on it? 

Concept: It has to begin with a strong narrative and experiential structure, bringing the player on an amazing and downright addictive journey.

[Maybe teachers need to develop the capabilities of a narrative designer?  Drama teachers are quite familiar with this through working with Process Drama]
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PicsArt for Windows 10 gets a big design revamp, all clipart packages are free until June 30

PicsArt for Windows 10 gets a big design revamp, all clipart packages are free until June 30 | Foreign Language Education | Scoop.it
The popular photo editing app PicsArt for Windows 10 on PC and Mobile has received a major update, including a design revamp and much more.

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Peter Azzopardi's curator insight, June 2, 2016 5:52 PM
In addition to the new version, all of the clipart packages available for PicsArt are free to download for Windows 10 and Windows 10 Mobile users until June 30.
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La théorie du complot expliquée aux enfants de France Television

La théorie du complot expliquée aux enfants de France Television | Foreign Language Education | Scoop.it
C’est devenu l’obsession de Kamel : il est persuadé que son prof d’anglais a une dent contre lui.  Comme par hasard, il n’a...

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63 Things Every Student Should Know In A Digital World

63 Things Every Student Should Know In A Digital World | Foreign Language Education | Scoop.it
63 Things Every Student Should Know In A Digital World

 

Learn more:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/

 


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María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, February 4, 2016 7:39 AM
63 Things Every Student Should Know In A Digital World
Wendy Zaruba's curator insight, February 4, 2016 9:42 AM

More like 63 Things Everyone should know in this Digital World, interesting.

Charli Wiggill's curator insight, February 4, 2016 12:07 PM

How well are you preparing your students for life in an increasingly digital world?

#MIEExpert #MIEExperts

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The Ultimate Guide to Gamifying Your Classroom | Edudemic

The Ultimate Guide to Gamifying Your Classroom | Edudemic | Foreign Language Education | Scoop.it
The effects of gamification include increased student engagement, and class wide enjoyment of academic lessons, even from reluctant learners.
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Gamification Does Not Equal Games, It Equals Engagement And Innovation

Gamification Does Not Equal Games, It Equals Engagement And Innovation | Foreign Language Education | Scoop.it
Gamification Equals Engagement And Innovation The first example is an onboarding program that we at Apex created for an international mining company, who approached us after an Association of Talent and Development (ATD) presentation we gave on...
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In Tree Story mobile game, you nurture virtual seedlings and plant trees in the real world | GamesBeat | Games | by Dean Takahashi

In Tree Story mobile game, you nurture virtual seedlings and plant trees in the real world | GamesBeat | Games | by Dean Takahashi | Foreign Language Education | Scoop.it

Zig Zag Zoom Games, a Los Angeles game publisher, is unveiling a series of mobile games today, including one called Tree Story that has an interesting twist. Players can nurture seedlings in a kind of virtual gardening game. And when they’re done, real-world trees will be planted.

The idea is to use the power and reach of a billion mobile gamers to do good. After all, Americans spend about 2 hours and 38 minutes a day on their phones, with 50 of those minutes dedicated to playing games, according to analytics firm Flurry. By creating a game that can support good causes on a smartphone, Zig Zag Zoom Games hopes to catch players on the platforms they use most often.


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Kim Flintoff's curator insight, March 27, 2015 12:20 AM

"Negotiable consequences" takes on new meaning...