On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know
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On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know
For parents learning about learning and education

(Teachers, please share this with the parents in your schools. Thanks!)
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49 Phrases to Calm an Anxious Child

49 Phrases to Calm an Anxious Child | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it
Have an anxious child? Try one of these 49 phrases: You are safe, what color is it, can you draw it, tell me the worst case, and more...
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Standards, Grades And Tests Are Wildly Outdated, Argues 'End Of Average'

Standards, Grades And Tests Are Wildly Outdated, Argues 'End Of Average' | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it
A Harvard faculty member argues in his new book that averages tell us nothing useful about individuals. That has big implications for schools.
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, March 7, 2016 11:33 PM
This has been the case for some time. We adopted "gradeless report cards" about 15 years ago. We used that term as the powers to be could not get their heads around the term narrative report cards. The ideas was that we could share with students and parents in a more qualitative and helpful way how students were doing.

What was intriguing was after all the groundwork we did in our little corner of the universe how little credit we were given. Instead, it was given to others who just copied what we did.
Geoffrey Grant's curator insight, March 7, 2016 11:59 PM
This has been the case for some time. We adopted "gradeless report cards" about 15 years ago. We used that term as the powers to be could not get their heads around the term narrative report cards. The ideas was that we could share with students and parents in a more qualitative and helpful way how students were doing.

What was intriguing was after all the groundwork we did in our little corner of the universe how little credit we were given. Instead, it was given to others who just copied what we did.
Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, March 8, 2016 9:49 AM
This has been the case for some time. We adopted "gradeless report cards" about 15 years ago. We used that term as the powers to be could not get their heads around the term narrative report cards. The ideas was that we could share with students and parents in a more qualitative and helpful way how students were doing.

What was intriguing was after all the groundwork we did in our little corner of the universe how little credit we were given. Instead, it was given to others who just copied what we did.
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Does Algebra Get in the Way of Student Success?

Does Algebra Get in the Way of Student Success? | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it
Algebra, trigonometry and calculus keep millions of people from graduating. And they're unnecessary, argues author and professor Andrew Hacker.
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What Harnessing the Positive Side of Stress Can Do for Students

What Harnessing the Positive Side of Stress Can Do for Students | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it
“There is almost no relationship between the amount of stress you are under and your stress mindset,” said McGonigal. Learning tactics to change one’s outlook on stress can be beneficial for anyone. “How you think about stress seems to influence how you cope with stress,” she said.
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What’s your biggest parenting mistake?

What’s your biggest parenting mistake? | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it
The woman who told women they can’t have it all has got some new advice for us.
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How People Learn to Become Resilient

How People Learn to Become Resilient | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it
Maria Konnikova writes about resilience and the skills that researches say can be learned to acquire it.
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The Math Revolution

The Math Revolution | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it

By Peg Tyre, The Atlantic

 

The number of American teens who excel at advanced math has surged. Why?

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The Science Of Getting Kids Organized

The Science Of Getting Kids Organized | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it
Can teaching kids impulse control, self-evaluation and focus actually help them do better in school? Parents are paying top dollar for executive function coaches.
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Classroom standing desks may curb kids’ sedentary time

Classroom standing desks may curb kids’ sedentary time | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it
Standing desks in classrooms could be an easy way to help make kids’ time in school less sedentary, a new research review suggests.
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Our (Bare) Shelves, Our Selves

Our (Bare) Shelves, Our Selves | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it
The increasing absence of physical books, records and photo albums in homes can negatively affect developing intellects.
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A Peek Inside: What Kids Saw On A Common Core Test

A Peek Inside: What Kids Saw On A Common Core Test | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it
One of the two state consortia behind new, Common Core-aligned tests has released questions from its spring assessments.
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Week's Best Articles on Learning and Education, for Parents

Week's Best Articles on Learning and Education, for Parents | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it

by Ava Arsaga, Parent Cortical Mass

 

Here are nine questions for you this week. Are parents being guilted over children’s screen time? ● Should you let your kid use Snapchat? ● How can you tell if an app is really educational? ● How much help do teachers expect parents to provide their kids on school projects? ● Could you be confused about what a growth mindset really is? ● Do you know how the “testing effect” works? ● Does comparing U.S. and Chinese scores on international tests mislead parents? ● Are you familiar with the new college rankings...

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Week's Best Articles on Learning and Education, for Parents

Week's Best Articles on Learning and Education, for Parents | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it

by Ava Arsaga, Parent Cortical Mass

 

The parent movement to “opt out” of excessive standardized tests has been so persuasive it actually won over President Obama this week.

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What Do Parents Think of Online Gradebooks?

What Do Parents Think of Online Gradebooks? | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it
New software better connects parents with what’s happening in their children’s classrooms—but it can also lead to heightened surveillance and less risk-taking.
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Video Games And Social Media Hurt Teens' Sleep, Study Says

Video Games And Social Media Hurt Teens' Sleep, Study Says | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it
"People don't make up their lost sleep."
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The idea that Mozart makes your baby smarter is one of parenting’s most persistent myths

The idea that Mozart makes your baby smarter is one of parenting’s most persistent myths | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it
Many parents think classical music makes babies smarter. They're wrong. “There is no good evidence that listening to Mozart, or listening to anything, does anything for intelligence or cognitive skills in domains that are not musical,” says Samuel Mehr, a PhD student at Harvard who studies music’s powerful—but mysterious—effect on people. So why has the "Mozart effect"...
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How schools are closing the 30 million word gap

How schools are closing the 30 million word gap | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it
Combating the 30 million word gap: the research-backed idea that children who grow up in poverty come to school having heard 30 million fewer spoken words than their peers from middle-class or upper-class homes putting them at a sharp disadvantage in terms of their language skills.
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Is Immediate Feedback Always Best?

Is Immediate Feedback Always Best? | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it

For decades we’ve heard the mantra, “immediate feedback is best.” But is this always the case? We often simplify learning in the classroom as a response to positive and negative feedback that motivates our students to perform.

 


Via Nik Peachey
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Fernando Castro's curator insight, February 21, 2016 2:46 AM

In my view, quality feedback is always better than immediate feedback.

Ressources pour les cours d'anglais's curator insight, February 28, 2016 12:56 PM

Un article très intéressant montrant que ce n'est pas le même type de mémoire qui est sollicité lorsque l'on pratique le feedback immédiat.

Character Minutes's curator insight, March 10, 2016 4:52 PM

I never really thought it was.

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New Ways to Teach Young Children to Code

New Ways to Teach Young Children to Code | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it
Many parents want their children to learn to code. Tech leaders and educators are pushing schools to add more computer-science classes, and families often see programming as an essential skill for the future.

But unlike reading to your children or teaching them to count, preparing children to code can feel daunting and unnatural. Many parents think they can’t help because they don’t know math or programming themselves.

Increasingly, though, parents who have never written a line of code are finding ways to teach their children basic programming skills. Some tap websites, gaming apps or online puzzles using visual programming languages designed for children. Others focus on teaching the kind of thinking that coding requires. For instance, even young children can learn how to break tasks into steps and perform them in order—a programming concept called sequencing—or to repeat a series of steps until a task is complete, a concept called loops.

Via Kim Flintoff
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Karen B Wehner's curator insight, February 10, 2016 10:36 AM

Perhaps inevitable that games-based learning would come to this?

Viljenka Savli (http://www2.arnes.si/~sopvsavl/)'s curator insight, February 11, 2016 8:58 AM

A new era for this generation... 

Janine Roy's curator insight, February 12, 2016 11:49 AM

Interesting article on coding with young children.  @sunshinemary  #sd61learn

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These are the books students at the top US colleges are required to read

These are the books students at the top US colleges are required to read | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it
The leaders of tomorrow will be well versed in dead philosophers, according to a new database of college syllabi. The Open Syllabus Project, a collection of over 1 million curricula from English-language colleges and universities over the past 15 years, released its data on Friday (Jan. 22). Plato, Hobbes, Machiavelli, and Aristotle overwhelmingly dominate lists in the US,...
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Does TV Rot Your Brain?

Does TV Rot Your Brain? | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it

by R. Douglas Fields, Scientific American

 

Scientists have linked TV viewing to antisocial behavior, lowered verbal IQ and altered brain structure—but a new study raises questions

Parent Cortical Mass's insight:

Interesting new reserach

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Week's Best Articles on Learning and Education, for Parents

Week's Best Articles on Learning and Education, for Parents | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it

by Ava Arsaga, Parent Cortical Mass

 

After fifteen years, the era of No Child Left Behind is nearly over. Congress will likely pass a new law--the Every Student Succeeds Act. Many NCLB policies have been abandoned. Powers of the Secretary of Education have been specifically limited, likely due to Sec Arne Duncan's political tactics over his seven year tenure. The short summary of this policy defeat: State Gov’t 1; Federal Gov’t 0. ● “In parenting, is ‘failure’ the new black?” asks Richard Rende. Current advice says parents should ...

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Is it time to update NAEP? - The Hechinger Report

Is it time to update NAEP? - The Hechinger Report | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it
On the most recent nationwide U.S. math test, known as the National Assessment of Educational Progress or NAEP, an eighth grader might have been asked a question about stem-and-leaf plots (see the sample question in the graphic on this page or here). Have no idea what those are? Probably the eighth grader didn’t either. It’s …
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How To Think: Older People Can Teach Us All Something - PsyBlog

How To Think: Older People Can Teach Us All Something - PsyBlog | On Learning & Education: What Parents Need to Know | Scoop.it
What older people can teach youngsters (and all of us) about how to learn.

Via Peter Rettig
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Peter Rettig's curator insight, November 4, 2015 11:33 AM

Hmm - what about learning a foreign language? Are we ever too old for that?

rensoduplessis's curator insight, November 5, 2015 6:23 AM

renso du plessis