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Food, Nutrition, Health, Safety, and Good Eats: Science-based Information a Foodie Needs to Know. AnnaResurreccion@gmail.com
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Trend spotting 2013: Protein rocks! Why muscle is a hot new issue, and the rise of the ‘aware’ shopper

Trend spotting 2013: Protein rocks! Why muscle is a hot new issue, and the rise of the ‘aware’ shopper | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it
Muscle and protein will be hot trends across every age group in 2013 as more US shoppers look to maintain lean muscle mass and stay healthy and active as they age, predict trend spotters.
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How to Cook Tupig : Filipino Sticky Rice Logs with Coconut Cream ...

How to Cook Tupig : Filipino Sticky Rice Logs with Coconut Cream ... | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it
At the urging of Amy, I retrieved a heritage essay on the presence of tupig at the “Filipino Christmas Table”, in an excerpt here by the late Professor Doreen Gamboa Fernandez, the pioneer in Philippine food writing: In Laoag ...

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Myths dispelled about High Fructose Corn Syrup.

Myths dispelled about High Fructose Corn Syrup. | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

Recently: there have been posts and articles on high fructose corn syrup. One such article is http://bit.ly/TAhYXY

Much of the material in this and other articles is simply misinformation and should not be heeded.

One  example from that article is:

 

Myth:  HFCS is corn syrup that has been altered to convert more of its sugars into fructose, a sweeter sugar.(Natural sources of fructose include fruits, vegetables including sugar cane, and honey.The natural sources are not the problem.)

 

Fact: HFCS is from corn, a natural source.  There is no difference between fructose in HFCS and that from natural sources. Anyone who eats sugar (sucrose) is consuming fructose, because a molecule of sucrose contains 1 molecule of glucose and i molecule of fructose simply linked together.

 

Myth: On food labels, beware of Glucose-Fructose

 

Fact: Obesity is a problem, of epidemic proportions in this country.  DIet  is a large factor accompaniedd by lack of exercise. We all need to avoid consuming more than moderate amounts of fats and sugar.  Glucose-Fructose is sucrose, table sugar.  Fruit contain fructose.  None of these compounds are harmful, except when intake is excessively high as they contribute to weight gain and ultimately obesity if left unchecked.     

 

For more Myths versus Facts, Read this re-scoop from an earlier post on FoodieDoc. : 

High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is “one of the most misunderstood food ingredients”, and continues to be lambasted in the media and on the internet long after the scientific debate over its relative contribution to the obesity epidemic vs sugar has...

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Guide to Cured Italian Meats: Salami, Salame, or Salumi

Guide to Cured Italian Meats: Salami, Salame, or Salumi | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

Guide to Cured Italian Meats: Salami, Salame, or Salumi salame salumi salami cacciatore prosciutto prosciutto cotto, finocchiona, capocollo, soppressata, culatello, mortadella... *

 

Ciauscolo - Ciauscolo (sometimes also spelled ciavuscolo or ciabuscolo) is a variety of Italian spreadable salame, typical of the Marche region (especially of the Province of Macerata). Ciauscolo is a smoked and dry-cured sausage, made from pork meat and fat. Salame di fabriano - These salamis are made from the pork thigh diced with pointed knife, the lard is diced into cubes from the pork cheeks, and all is seasoned with finely ground pepper, pepper corns, salt and then ‘encased’ in silky intestine, the end product is fragrant and aromatic Coppa (and/or Capicola / Capocollo) * Cacciatore (salami or dried sausage made from ground pork) Soppressata (salami or dried sausage made from ground pork) * Guanciale * Salt Pork * Spalla * Lardo * Pancetta * Speck * Culatello * * Read the article

 


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What is the Difference Between a Food Allergy, Food Intolerance and Food Sensitivity? - IFT.org

What is the Difference Between a Food Allergy, Food Intolerance and Food Sensitivity? - IFT.org | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

What is the Difference Between a Food Allergy, Food Intolerance and Food Sensitivity?

 

"Eight foods account for 90 percent of all food-allergic reactions: milk, egg, peanut, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, soy, and wheat. While a lot of people will eventually grow out of allergies to milk, eggs, wheat or soy, allergies to peanuts and shellfish tend to be longer lasting and impose severe symptoms"-- Aurora Saulo. .

 

While most people define any negative reaction to food as a food allergy, many actually suffer from a food sensitivity or intolerance. This videoclip  from  the Institute of Food Technoologissts, IFT, features Aurora Saulo, professor and extension specialist in food technology at University of Hawaii Manoa,

 

Dr. Saulo Internationally recognized specialist on food safety,    discusses  food allergies, food intolerances and food sensitivities. This story is curated by FoodieDoc, Anna Resurreccion, Ph.D.  Both

Drs. Saulo and Resurreccion are Fellows of the IFT.

http://bit.ly/Wg2Wsq

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How to Keep Food Safe When Tailgating Q & A - IFT.org

How to Keep Food Safe When Tailgating Q & A - IFT.org | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

 

Bob Gravani, former president of the Institute of Food Technologists, IFT, and fellow food safety expert Bob Brackett, also a member of IFT, provide excellent advice on tailgating that could save your life or that of a loved one.

 

Read on:  http://bit.ly/UKWPq4

FoodieDoc, Anna Resurreccion, Ph.D. Fellow of the Institute of Food Technologists    

 

Tailgating is a fun American tradition where food is prepared and enjoyed near the back of a car or truck, often in the parking lot of a sporting, music or other large event. However, food-borne illness is no fun. Careful planning and onsite precautions can help ensure your food is safe to eat.

 

How do I pack for tailgating safely?

First, make sure you have enough large coolers (or a plug-in car cooler) to hold all of your food and beverages comfortably. Keep coolers clean by removing any standing water, and wiping out the interior with an antibacterial wipe or product. Make sure you have enough gel or ice packs, and ice, to keep food cold, especially on hot days.

 

Tips for packing:

Pack the perishables, especially raw foods, separate from drinks and ready-to-eat foodsPack meats separately from raw fruits and vegetables to avoid cross-contaminationKeep pre-made sandwiches and other foods tightly sealedPut mayonnaise and similar products on ice just before you leave for the stadium, and then place them in the cooler last, on top of the other itemsPack just the food you need to minimize leftoversMake sure you have a food thermometer to test food temperature

 

How should you safely handle meats while tailgating?
If you are going to cook hamburgers, it’s best to purchase already formed patties to minimize contact with the meat, and ultimately, cross contamination. Hand sanitizers, antibacterial wipes and disposable gloves can be used to ensure safe handling of raw foods. After you touch meat, never touch other foods. Throw gloves away after you use them, and immediately dispose of any food that falls, or comes in contact with, the ground or other unclean surface.

 

Can you cook food partially at home so it grills faster while tailgating?
Meat should be either cooked completely at home and then reheated at the game, or cooked completely at the game. If you partially cook meat you will need to refrigerate or cool the meat, and then bring it back to its final temperature.

Meat must be cooked thoroughly (not burned) to avoid the spread of E. coli, Salmonella or other microorganisms that cause food borne illness. Ideally, hamburgers and hot dogs should be cooked to an internal temperature of 160 degrees. A thermometer is the only way to confirm optimal meat temperature, so it’s recommended to bring one along.

 

How long can foods like hot dogs and hamburgers sit out without being refrigerated?
According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), cooked foods should remain unrefrigerated or cooled no more than two hours.

 

What about mayonnaise-based foods, such as potato salad?
There is a misperception that mayonnaise-based products can easily make you sick. Mayonnaise is actually acidic, which protects foods against contamination from bacteria and viruses. However, like any perishable food, mayonnaise-based products should be placed in a cooler before and after the meal.

 

How do you keep hot food hot?
A crock pot, even one that is unplugged, can keep hot foods warm for several hours. In addition, there are warming devices that can directly plug into a car power outlet.

 

Are leftovers from a tailgate safe to eat?
When the tailgate is over, make sure that any leftovers are properly chilled, wrapped up and placed back into a cooler, or thrown away. In general, when in doubt throw it out!

 

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Top 10 Tips for Bagging Groceries - From IFT.org

Top 10 Tips for Bagging Groceries - From IFT.org | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

 

The Institute of Food Technologists, my professional organization, published these Top 10 Tips for Bagging Groceries

 

Read on: http://bit.ly/S3cUIU

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Do you know the difference between a crostini and bruschette?

Do you know the difference between a crostini and bruschette? | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

The word crostini means little toasts, whereas bruschetta has as its origin bruscare, to char or roast.  I’ve always thought the difference to be in the bread used. When I make crostini, I use a baguette, thinly sliced on the diagonal. For bruschette, I use a thicker slice taken from a loaf of Italian bread. I toast both before piling on the fixin’s and sometimes pop them back into the oven afterward. It really does depend on what’s being used to top each off. And speaking of the fixin’s, you can use pretty much anything you like. Just stick with fresh ingredients and you won’t go wrong.

 

Mozzarella and Tomato Bruschette Recipe

 

Ingredients

1.7 cm slices of Italian bread plum tomatoes, seeded and chopped garlic, minced a few tbsp of sweet onion, diced fresh mozzarella, cut in cubes fresh basil leaves, hand torn Italian seasoning olive oil Balsamic vinegar dried oregano salt & pepper

Click for directions

 

Crostini alla Caprese Recipe

Ingredients

1.2 cm thick slices of baguette, cut on the diagonal cherry tomatoes, sliced in half fresh mozzarella, cut in ¼ inch (.6 cm) slices fresh basil leaves olive oil red wine vinegar salt & pepper

Click for directions

 

Read on:

http://bit.ly/VIIaRY

 

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Skipping Breakfast Leads to Poor Food Choices

Skipping Breakfast Leads to Poor Food Choices | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it
People who don’t eat breakfast tend to overeat and make poor dietary choices throughout the day, according to new research presented at Neuroscience 2012, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience.

 

http://www.foodproductdesign.com/news/2012/11/skipping-breakfast-leads-to-poor-food-choices.aspx

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How to make fresh egg pasta

How to make fresh egg pasta | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

When making fresh home-made egg pasta, variously known in Italian as pasta fresca or pasta fatta in casa or pasta all’uovo, an easy to remember rule of thumb is to use 1 egg per 100g of flour for each person. If you are using imperial measurements, the rule is 1 egg per cup of flour per person. These rules of thumb, however, are not at all exact, as the results will depend on the exact size of the egg, the quality of the flour, even the humidity in the air, so be prepared to adjust as you go along. Pour the flour into the mixing bowl with a pinch of salt and the egg(s)...


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Flavor and Antioxidant Capacity of Peanut Paste and Peanut Butter Supplemented with Peanut Skins - Hathorn - 2012 - Journal of Food Science - Wiley Online Library

Flavor and Antioxidant Capacity of Peanut Paste and Peanut Butter Supplemented with Peanut Skins - Hathorn - 2012 - Journal of Food Science - Wiley Online Library | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

My former  graduate student, Dr. Lotis Francisco and I conducted  conducted several studies that revealed the high concentration of health beneficial polyphenolic antioxidents iin peanut skins.    

 

Scientists from North Carolina State University recently studied their use in peanut butter:

Peanut skins are a low-value residue material from peanut processing which contain naturally occurring phenolic compounds. The use of this material to improve antioxidant capacity and shelf-life of foods can add value to the material and improve the nutritional value of foods. The improved nutritional qualities and unchanged flavor profile occurring with low levels of peanuts skins in peanut paste and peanut butter suggest potential application of this technology in various food industries.

 

FoodieDoc, Anna Resurreccion

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Veggie proteins, mini-meals and Millennials: ConAgra unveils Phil Lempert's top trends for 2013

Veggie proteins, mini-meals and Millennials: ConAgra unveils Phil Lempert's top trends for 2013 | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it
Snackable mini-meals, veggie protein, healthier breakfasts and portion-controlled frozen foods will all gain momentum in 2013, according to ‘Supermarket Guru’ and TV personality Phil Lempert.
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Juiciness enhances the salt perception of meat products - IFT.org

Juiciness of meat products enhances its salt perception --this might be used as a strategy to reduce the salt in meats and meat formulations for lower salt in products and diets--

FoodieDoc, Anna Resurreccion. 

 

Read orginal story: http://bit.ly/VwDcYN

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Has the subject of "Red wine medicine" ran out?

Resveratrol in red wine and peanuts resveratrol is said to prevent
several lifestyle diseases, as cancer, coronary heart disease, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases.The recent clinical trialswill be subjected to evaluation and discussion at the Resveratrol2012 conference this coming week at the University of Leicester, Great Britain.

 

 

 

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Tagliatelli with Porcini Mushrooms

Tagliatelli with Porcini Mushrooms | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

We had this delectable dish at Mediterraneo, a retaurant in Uganda.

I was happy to see this recipe, so I am sharing it with you.  Enjoy .--FoodieDoc, Anna Resurreccion. 


Who knew that something that tastes so rich, warm, and elegant could be so easy to cook! Porcini mushrooms (fresh) are not inexpensive, so I was a little scared about the cooking. As it turns out, if you have ever sautéed any other type of mushroom, it is just about like that!

Ingredients

1 onion Extra virgin Olive oil 3 cloves of garlic Fresh Porcini Mushroom, cleaned and cut into bite size pieces Vegetable broth Salt Red pepper flakes Fresh chopped parsley Tagliatelli fresh wild mint (or fresh regular mint, will do) chopped Click for Directions
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Italian-American Christmas: Turkey breast stuffed with Italian sausage and Marsala-steeped cranberries

Italian-American Christmas: Turkey breast stuffed with Italian sausage and Marsala-steeped cranberries | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

The true Italian Christmas dinner is very much about the capon, but Turkey for you could be easier to find and mora appreciated by relatives. So You need to go to a butcher to get a whole breast joint and you need to ask for it to be butterflied and boned and make sure the skin is left on. I specify Italian sausages for the stuffing. You can go for the milder ones, often sold as ‘sweet’ or the hotter chillified fennel sausages, as you please.

 

Serves 12 (or many more as part of a buffet)
STUFFING

100g l 3½ oz dried cranberries 100ml l 3½ fl oz Marsala 2 x 15ml tablespoons olive oil 2 echalion or banana shallots, peeled and finely chopped ¼ teaspoon ground cloves ½ teaspoon ground allspice 2 teaspoons chopped fresh sage 1kg l 2¼ lb Italian sausages (salsicce) 2 eggs, beaten approx 50g l 2oz grated Parmesan approx 60g l 2½ oz breadcrumbs

FOR THE TURKEY JOINT

1 x 5kg l 11lb double breast turkey joint, boned, butterflied, with skin left on 4 x 15ml tablespoons duck or goose fat Directions

 


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Six Facts About Kosher Foods-- Foodie Doc

Six Facts About Kosher Foods-- Foodie Doc | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

What does Kosher mean and five other questions and answers about Kosher foods from the Institute of Food Technologists, IFT. IFT is the premier source of science-based knowledge about Food. 

 

View the videoclip featuring Dr. Joe Regentstein of Cornell University-- Internationally known expert on Kosher Foods.  Learn how to spot symbols on authentic Kosher foods.  

 

Curated by FoodieDoc, Anna Resurreccion, Ph.D a Fellow of the Institute of Food Technologists and recipient off its 2010 B.S. Luh International Award. .

 

http://bit.ly/UJXr53

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Communicating Nutrition at the Point of Purchase -

Communicating Nutrition at the Point of Purchase - | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

 

The average American consumer spends 44 minutes on a typical grocery trip (Hamrick et al. 2011). This includes the time to find all the items they need, compare brands, price, flavors, and nutrition, consider any in-store specials, check out, pay, and pack their groceries. Anything that speeds up these activities is beneficial to the consumer.

 

The addition of nutrition data and scorecards to the front of packaging and at the grocery shelf helps shoppers choose healthier foods and spurs product developers to reexamine their formulations.

 

Read this story by Annette Maggi for the Institute of Food Technologists: IFT.Org

 

FoodieDoc, Anna Resurreccion, Phh.D

 

http://bit.ly/RI7SBJ

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The Unexpected Evolution of Dessert -

Culinary professionals are more creative, when formulating dessert products by adding bold flavors, enriching texture, and combining nontraditional ingredients like vegetables.

 

From the Institute of Food Technologists, IFT.org

Curated by FoodieDoc, Dr. Anna Resurreccion

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Organic food inspections lacking, former inspector says

Organic food inspections lacking, former inspector says | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it
Former organic food inspector says current inspection system needs overhauling to make sure organic foods are what their growers claim them to be.

Via Cathryn Wellner
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Vongole with Pancetta - Clams with Bacon

Vongole with Pancetta - Clams with Bacon | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

The combination of vongole with pancetta work well: the tastes complement each other. It is nice to serve with crusty homemade bread to soak op the juices, although those turn out quite salty. This dish has a lot of taste for the small amount of work involved.

This is good with any coastal Italian dry white. Since vongole are eaten a lot at the coast of Le Marche, a Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi would be appropriate.

 

Ingredients - For 3-4 servings as an antipasto

1 kilogram (2.2 lbs) vongole or other small clams 100 grams (4 oz) pancetta 1 onion 1 clove garlic 1 glass (100 ml) dry white wine 2 Tbsp chopped fresh flatleaf parsley chili pepper flakes 2 Tbsp olive oil Directions


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Plant Medicine for Menopause

Plant Medicine for Menopause | FoodieDoc says: | Scoop.it

Nutritional supplements, along with diet, exercise and stress management, can help women feel their best as they enter perimenopause and menopause, according to Tori Hudson, N.D., clinical professor, National college of Naturopathic Medicine..

 

Read about how

 

Black cohosh

Ginseng

Kava

Kudzu

Maca

Red clover, and

Sibiric rhubarb

 

can help menopausal women.

-- FoodieDoc, Anna Resurreccion

 

http://www.naturalproductsinsider.com/articles/2012/10/plant-medicine-for-menopause.aspx

 

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How to taste wine and understanding the olfactory system

A detailed animation on how to taste wine like a professional and understanding the mechanism behind it.


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