Sustainability: Permaculture, Appropriate Technology & Bio-Remediation
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Black To The Land: Project Explores Connections Between Race and Place

Black To The Land: Project Explores Connections Between Race and Place | Sustainability: Permaculture, Appropriate Technology & Bio-Remediation | Scoop.it
Most African Americans, Caribbean Americans, and African immigrants live in cities. That doesn’t mean they don’t have deep roots.
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40 Acres and a chipper/shredder.....

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Warka Water – Every Drop Counts

Warka Water – Every Drop Counts | Sustainability: Permaculture, Appropriate Technology & Bio-Remediation | Scoop.it


Warka Tower is a vertical structure designed to collect and harvest potable water from the air, providing an alternative water source for rural populations that face challenges accessing drinkable water. The canopy creates a shaded social space where the community can gather for education and public meetings. With photovoltaic panels, the Tower serves as a charging station, allowing villagers to power mobile phones and laptop computers, and offers an illuminated place to study and socialize after the sun goes down.

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Here's Why a Chicken Can Live Without Its Head

Here's Why a Chicken Can Live Without Its Head | Sustainability: Permaculture, Appropriate Technology & Bio-Remediation | Scoop.it
Mike The Headless Chicken lived for 18 months without a noggin after a farmer, in a failed attempt at slaughter, axed off his head and missed the jugular vein. “Miracle Mike” was eye-droppered a milk and water mixture until he met his unexpected death over a year later when he choked on a kernel of corn.
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Primitive techonology : Unique way to cook rice in bamboo tubes Survival skill in forest A New 2018

Primitive techonology : Unique way to cook rice in bamboo tubes Survival skill in forest A New 2018 Primitive techonology : Unique way to cook rice in bamboo...
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Wendell Berry film poetically documents industrialization of agriculture –

Wendell Berry film poetically documents industrialization of agriculture – | Sustainability: Permaculture, Appropriate Technology & Bio-Remediation | Scoop.it
Berry insists today’s farming industry is based on a false ideal for a false economy which works against nature and enslaves many people — and not just American farmers, but immigrant farmers as well, who out of economic necessity travel annually from Mexico to Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia where there is not enough local farming labor.

Through policy, we have wiped American farmers out. This chapter is one of the more dense ones, but it sets the stage for the remainder of the film.
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Commercialization of Hemp-based Bioplastics | Cannabis Tech

Commercialization of Hemp-based Bioplastics | Cannabis Tech | Sustainability: Permaculture, Appropriate Technology & Bio-Remediation | Scoop.it
True commercialization of hemp-based plastics could be just around the corner in North America. Hemp is experiencing a revolution, its popularity as a raw material has exploded in recent years thanks to deregulation of hemp in the United States and the growing acceptance of the cannabis sativa plant family as a whole.

 

An eco-friendly focused packaging company out of Alaska seems set to take the world by storm in 2018 with the launch of its hemp-based plastics and packaging production facility. According to Kevin Tubbs, president of the Alaskan based Best Practices Packaging (BPP),  “We’re commercializing hemp bioplastic for the first time in North American history. We can produce virtually whatever the market demands,” and the demand for plastics has reached extraordinary levels in North America, to say the least.

 

If there was ever a time for the introduction of large-scale, bio-friendly plastics manufacturing, generated from renewable resources like hemp, it’s now. As of 2015, the world had produced 6300 million metric tons of plastics, of which only nine percent had ever reached a recycling plant. Nearly 80 percent of these plastics simply ended up in the oceans or the natural environment. Experts predict that by 2050 if the status quo of plastic consumption remains unchanged, the natural environment will carry upwards of 12,000 million metric tons of the stuff.

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California’s electrical grid can’t handle all the solar energy the state is producing

California’s electrical grid can’t handle all the solar energy the state is producing | Sustainability: Permaculture, Appropriate Technology & Bio-Remediation | Scoop.it

In California, solar power is booming: The state leads the nation in solar production, and for a brief period on March 11, California pulled nearly 40 percent of its electricity from the sun.

As the Los Angeles Times journalist Ivan Penn explains, California has actually paid neighboring states to take its surplus renewable energy — dozens of times this year.


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ThePlanetaryArchives - San Francisco's insight:

The grid is dead. Each building must produce it's own electricity, capture and recycle it's own water, and recycle it's own waste. Any "grid" or centralized collection system wastes 50% of the energy needed to operate it. Burning petroleum to dispose of or recycle waste, transmission lines for electricity, and water shipped hundreds of miles is all obsolete technology.

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INDUSTRIAL HEMP - BRIEF PRESENTATION ON HISTORY AND USES

Hi guys! Thanks for tuning in. This is first youtube presentation ever so thanks so much for whoever supports my journey. The purpose of this video is to jus...
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More Than Good Looks: Try These 10 Edible Flowers

More Than Good Looks: Try These 10 Edible Flowers | Sustainability: Permaculture, Appropriate Technology & Bio-Remediation | Scoop.it
Eating flowers seems almost heretical. If plants could talk, wouldn't they say, you can look, even sniff, but please don’t chow down on my pretty petals? The dainty apple flower, after all, is what gives way to the fruit, and thus the seed, ensuring the cycle of life continues. Do you dare give into the temptation to pluck it for food?

Many a chef certainly has. But most folks are clueless to the vast array of edible flowers. Apple blossoms, for example, impart a delicate floral flavor to fruit salads, along with a heavenly aroma. With many herbs, the flowers taste just like the leaf—chive flowers are a colorful way to infuse salad dressing with a garlic flavor.

On the other hand, some flowers are technically edible, but unpleasantly acrid. Chrysanthemums, for example, or begonias. One reference describes the flavor of wax begonias as slightly bitter with “a hint of swamp.”

A word of warning before we get on to our list of edibles: Exercise caution when using flowers in the kitchen; many are poisonous. Those daffodils in your perennial border could cause nausea, diarrhea, itchiness, stupor, convulsions, or even death, depending on how much you eat. (In almost all cases it’s not just the flower that’s poisonous, it’s the entire plant.) Below, you’ll fine a list of safe-to-consume flowers that we think you’ll enjoy, with a few thoughts on how to grow and use them. And if you’re ever unsure, here’s a list of common poisonous plants whose flowers you never want to ingest.
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The Peril on your Plate: GMO products, weed killing chemicals and pesticides, what’s in your food? — RTD Documentary Channel Films

The Peril on your Plate: GMO products, weed killing chemicals and pesticides, what’s in your food? — RTD Documentary Channel Films | Sustainability: Permaculture, Appropriate Technology & Bio-Remediation | Scoop.it
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The Gospel of Small Fishes: Kirk Lombard at TEDxMonterey

In The Sea Forager's Guide to the Northern California Coast, Kirk Lombard combines a startling depth of knowledge with wry humor and colorful storytelling to guide readers' quests to hook fish, dig clams, and pick seaweed for themselves. Leighton Kelly's stunning, occasionally idiosyncratic illustrations complement practical instructions for gathering a variety of fish and seafood and delicious recipes for what to do with each catch. Lombard, a former staff member at the state Department of Fish and Game and founder of the foraging tour company/seafood delivery service Sea Forager Seafood, insists that his readers follow all regulations and encourages sustainable practices above and beyond what the State of California requires. This quirky and useful how-to is sure to inspire an empowering epicurean adventure.

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Boro ni bamboo water pump..

It's eco water pump in remote village do watch and subscribe friends...To get the latest news...
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Irrigating Fields With Sunshine, The Sunflower Pump Is An Insipired Low-Cost ... - CleanTechnica

Irrigating Fields With Sunshine, The Sunflower Pump Is An Insipired Low-Cost ... - CleanTechnica | Sustainability: Permaculture, Appropriate Technology & Bio-Remediation | Scoop.it
Irrigating Fields With Sunshine, The Sunflower Pump Is An Insipired Low-Cost ...

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Iraqis’ Diet Fifteen Years After the Invasion. Travelling Through Baghdad | Global Research - Centre for Research on Globalization

Iraqis’ Diet Fifteen Years After the Invasion. Travelling Through Baghdad | Global Research - Centre for Research on Globalization | Sustainability: Permaculture, Appropriate Technology & Bio-Remediation | Scoop.it

Inside the store, I saunter along one isle perusing canned and bottled items. Pickled olives and mayonnaise, salad dressings, tang and apple juice, cheeses, olive oil, pasta, canned tuna and tea– almost all of them imported. Not Israel here, but Spain, Turkey, Columbia, China, Thailand, Egypt, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia supply Iraqis with most of their food. Foreign company names appear on all packaged food items I examine. Moreover, prices here (where 1,300 Iraqi dinar = one dollar) differ little from US supermarket rates. The cost of a ‘Pringles’ package or a can of tuna in Baghdad, for example, is what I pay in the U.S.

When we turn to fresh produce, fruits and vegetables, the situation is even more alarming. Here too most produce is imported. Even oranges (in this land of orange trees). Beets and cabbage are marked ‘Iraqi’, but pomegranate, okra, eggplant, bananas, cucumber and other greens are from Jordan, Turkey and beyond. The nicest looking tomatoes (a staple in Iraqi dishes) are foreign produced.

Why these imports when Iraq is still largely rural? Foreign produce is less expensive than that grown by Iraq’s farmers, I’m told. Why? Because they are priced to undercut Iraqi production. Why? Because import licenses are awarded to foreign suppliers. And why is this? Because ministry personnel who negotiate these contracts receive handsome kickbacks. This, at the same time, when: a) electricity supply in Iraq is so weak and unreliable that local production is impossible, and b) ministries responsible for agriculture and manufacturing don’t function in the interests of Iraqi producers. Iraq’s once thriving agricultural base is woefully neglected and derelict.

These conditions are a direct result of government policy and a heavily corrupt bureaucracy. In the case of the bankrupt Palestinian economy, declining production and joblessness are to a large degree imposed by the occupier, Israel, implemented through a compliant Palestinian bureaucracy, oversupplied with wage earners whose disposable income supports a consumption economy and reliance on imports.

In Iraq, the US government still wields enormous influence on Iraq’s administration. From the start of its occupation of Iraq, the U.S. has thwarted attempts to rebuild the nation’s electricity grid and build and install machinery essential to a functioning manufacturing base.

(Significantly, some energy is available to ensure that communications function so that Iraqis can access television and their phone apps. Most homes and small businesses augment a patchy, inadequate government electrical supply with batteries and generators, imported of course.)

These conditions, in both Palestine and Iraq, are bald ‘disaster capitalism’. They exhibit what Naomi Klein identifies in The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism. Her influential 2007 study was followed in 2015 by Disaster Capitalism, offering irrefutable evidence of these insidious foreign-directed processes which enrich outside powers while directing responsibility onto incompetent corrupt local governments.

ThePlanetaryArchives - San Francisco's insight:

Processed foods are only good for the manufacturers.....

The Europeans (and "Eurolites") are ruining the world's food supply as well as everyone's diet.

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Raising Backyard Chickens for Dummies - Modern Farmer

Raising Backyard Chickens for Dummies - Modern Farmer | Sustainability: Permaculture, Appropriate Technology & Bio-Remediation | Scoop.it

"After several years of pestering my wife to get backyard chickens, she finally relented this past fall. I made all the traditional arguments: the kids will love them, we'll have fresh eggs every day, I promise to clean the yard and the coop, no it won't smell, trust me — and on and on. I would overtly send her photos of cool chicken coops hoping that one day she'd like one and magically say 'yes' to my request. Alas, this went on for about five years and the arguments were always the same. We have no room in the yard. They will indeed smell. Who's going to clean up after them? You are too busy. Yadda yadda yadda."

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Native Hawai’ians restore centuries-old fish 'refrigerators'

Native Hawai’ians restore centuries-old fish 'refrigerators' | Sustainability: Permaculture, Appropriate Technology & Bio-Remediation | Scoop.it
Native Hawai’ians say the first fishpond was built in East Maui by a master fisherman who was a semi deity. The ponds nurture both seawater and freshwater fish populations, which were easily gathered with nets as required. Both types acted as natural refrigerators, keeping fish healthy and thriving until harvested to feed hungry people.

The seawater fishponds were sited and built to take advantage of estuaries—sites where seawater and freshwater meet as a stream or river flows out to the ocean. These intriguing structures were constructed by as many as 10,000 workers from lava rock. One of the most well-known versions, the loko kuapa, consists of a semicircular rock wall enclosing coastal waters and an estuary. Mākāhā are strategically placed where currents flow in and out of the pond, allowing juvenile fish to enter the enclosure. The wooden slats keep mature fish inside, allowing them to grow until they’re large enough to harvest. Limu, or seaweed, phytoplankton, many varieties of algae and other marine plants grow readily in the fishpond’s brackish water.
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California Food Cooperative (Draft).pdf - Google Drive

California Food Cooperative (Draft).pdf - Google Drive | Sustainability: Permaculture, Appropriate Technology & Bio-Remediation | Scoop.it

The most recent reports from the San Francisco Food Security Task Force, as well as A Changing Landscape: Food Security and Services in San Francisco’s Tenderloin both conclude that the current food programs in the City do not meet the needs of the most vulnerable populations, especially children and seniors. To date, few of the recommendations in these reports have been implemented. Even if they were, there would still be enormous food security problems in San Francisco. What makes this project unique is that it utilizes produce the same day it reaches the City. Instead of being handled, stored, and handled again (and perhaps again and again), fresh fruits and vegetables will immediately be turned into soups, salsas, juices, salad mixes, and chopped vegetables.


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ThePlanetaryArchives - San Francisco's curator insight, May 30, 11:04 AM

Here's some "social networking" for you.....

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Hemp Can Free Us From Oil, Prevent Deforestation, Cure Cancer and It's Environmentally Friendly. Here's How:

Hemp Can Free Us From Oil, Prevent Deforestation, Cure Cancer and It's Environmentally Friendly. Here's How: | Sustainability: Permaculture, Appropriate Technology & Bio-Remediation | Scoop.it
Historical Use: Hemp is the most universally useful plant we have at our disposal. The history of mankind's use of hemp can be traced way back in time to between about 5000 - 7000 BC. Remains of seed husks have been found at...

Via Leslie Fieger, DrMichael John Ingraham, ThePlanetaryArchives - San Francisco
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Why the world needs hemp plastic | Cannabis Tech

Why the world needs hemp plastic | Cannabis Tech | Sustainability: Permaculture, Appropriate Technology & Bio-Remediation | Scoop.it
Hemp plastic is increasingly becoming a viable option as an eco-friendly alternative to carbon-based plastic. Not only is this bioplastic sourced from safe and sustainable hemp plants, but it is also typically both biodegradable and recyclable.

 

Although in the past there have been many problems with supposedly biodegradable plastics, the recent innovations are putting these issues to bed. Hemp plastics are quickly proving equally as diverse as regular plastics.

 

According to Canopy Corporation, the future of hemp plastic is bright. Automotive companies across Europe are moving away from petroleum-based plastics entirely for the dashboards, paneling and other design touches in new models. The sheer number of parts molded from hemp plastics demonstrates its usability as a material.

The benefits of hemp plastics far outweigh their petroleum-based counterparts. For example, its estimated that hemp fiberglass costs only .50 to .70 cents per pound, in comparison to upward of 5 dollars per pound for carbon-based fiberglass. On top of this, hemp products are continually shown to be more durable in accidents and are always much lighter than a metal equivalent.

Hemp plastics, alongside a host of other biodegradable plastic alternatives, are on the rise. It’s entirely feasible that in the very near future, all plastics will come from a sustainable, biodegradable resource.  Currently, hemp plastic is used to make speaker systems, guitar picks, 3D printer filaments, and thousands of other items.

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ThePlanetaryArchives - San Francisco's curator insight, June 8, 8:26 PM

Why can't "tech" solve the plastic crisis?

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Hmong hemp harvest/Ua Maj

Hemp, a part of our culture since ancient times...
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Primitive - Build Bamboo Boat

This is the Primitive Technology videos. Enjoy this is a wonderful Action to show how to make.Build Bamboo Boat primitive work...
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Yummy Pumpkin Fish Edible Amaranth Soup Recipe - Pumpkin Fish Edible Amaranth Soup Cooking - Cooking

Yummy Pumpkin Fish Edible Amaranth Soup Recipe - Pumpkin Fish Edible Amaranth Soup Cooking - Cooking With Sros Hello everyone. How are you so far. Here come ...
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Dangerous Liaison: Industrial Agriculture and the Reductionist Mindset | Global Research - Centre for Research on Globalization

Dangerous Liaison: Industrial Agriculture and the Reductionist Mindset | Global Research - Centre for Research on Globalization | Sustainability: Permaculture, Appropriate Technology & Bio-Remediation | Scoop.it
Food and agriculture across the world is in crisis. Food is becoming denutrified and unhealthy and diets less diverse. There is a loss of biodiversity, which threatens food security, soils are being degraded, water sources polluted and depleted and smallholder farmers, so vital to global food production, are being squeezed off their land and out of farming. 

A minority of the global population has access to so much food than it can afford to waste much of it, while food insecurity has become a fact of life for hundreds of millions. This crisis stems from food and agriculture being wedded to power structures that serve the interests of the powerful global agribusiness corporations.
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Melon Seeds Sheller|Hemp Seeds Husking Machine|Pine Nut Moringa Sunflower Seed Shelling Machine

Contact Email sales@longerinc.com or WhatsApp: +8618537181190 http://www.longer-machinery.com/product/other/moringa-seed-sheller.html Working process of melo...
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A Foodie’s Guide to Capitalism: Understanding the Political Economy of What We Eat – Rising Up with Sonali

A Foodie’s Guide to Capitalism: Understanding the Political Economy of What We Eat – Rising Up with Sonali | Sustainability: Permaculture, Appropriate Technology & Bio-Remediation | Scoop.it

FEATURING ERIC HOLT-GIMÉNEZ – Southern California based food-writer Gustavo Arellano recently profiled a restaurant in Costa Mesa called Taco Maria that charges $72 for a dozen fancy blue corn tamales. But rather than criticize the restaurant Arellano lauded the chef for paying premium dollars for high quality masa that supports Mexican farmers, “in order to challenge our current food system, where exploitation at every step, from the picker to the waiter, is the unfortunate norm.”

These days it’s all the rage to be a foodie and people who identify as such love to show off their obscure and delicious food finds on social media. But how many foodies actually understand the political economy of our food system? And why is it so critical for us to understand our food’s origins while we fetishize the perfect morsel?

For more information visit www.foodfirst.org.


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From toilet to table, overcoming the ‘yuk’ factor

From toilet to table, overcoming the ‘yuk’ factor | Sustainability: Permaculture, Appropriate Technology & Bio-Remediation | Scoop.it
In the poorest country of the Americas, a simple but unglamorous measure is improving basic sanitation, reducing the risk of disease and transforming thousands of gallons of excrement into nutrient-rich compost.

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Farmers Around the World: Nature Can Reduce Pesticide Use, Environment Impact | Global Research - Centre for Research on Globalization

Farmers Around the World: Nature Can Reduce Pesticide Use, Environment Impact | Global Research - Centre for Research on Globalization | Sustainability: Permaculture, Appropriate Technology & Bio-Remediation | Scoop.it
Farmers around the world are turning to nature to help them reduce pesticide use, environmental impact and, subsequently, and in some cases, increasing yields.

Specifically, they’re attracting birds and other vertebrates, which keep pests and other invasive species away from their crops. The study, led by Michigan State University and appearing in the current issue of the journal Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment, showcases some of the best global examples.

“Our review of research shows that vertebrates consume numerous crop pests and reduce crop damage, which is a key ecosystem service,” said Catherine Lindell, MSU integrative biologist who led the study. “These pest-consuming vertebrates can be attracted to agricultural areas through several landscape enhancements.”
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