3D Food Printing
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3D Food  Printing
Food printing, an opportunity often mentioned whenever people & media talk 3D printing. What makes food printing particularly interesting is the possibility to tailor nutrition, taste, texture, shape and size to needs & liking of any individual! Different institutes like innovation research centre TNO but also start ups like Barcelona based "Natural Machines" have started trying this out and are experimenting in this area. Also well-known food manufacturers like chocolate giant Hershey's and Italian food brand Barilla now start to put their toe in the water....  I am sure food printing has the potential to develop into  something bigger (it is not just printing pizza)!
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The Future of Food: Ten Trends in Food Sustainability

The Future of Food: Ten Trends in Food Sustainability | 3D Food  Printing | Scoop.it
These emerging trends will meet the SDGs and shape the future of #food #sustainability.

#Innovation #Impact #SDG

https://t.co/FzZ6OTMeNp
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BeeHex Raises $1M in Funding

BeeHex Raises $1M in Funding | 3D Food  Printing | Scoop.it
BeeHex, a Columbus, Ohio-based 3D food printing company, completed its $1m seed funding round
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Natural Machines, Foodini and the future of 3D Food Printing

Natural Machines, Foodini and the future of 3D Food Printing | 3D Food  Printing | Scoop.it
Lynette Kucsma's vision about the future of 3D food printing is clear: it's coming and it's going to mean more than fancy shapes. Here's the interview.
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Print Food & Eat The Cake by inkedibles

Print Food & Eat The Cake by inkedibles | 3D Food  Printing | Scoop.it
There are many edible printers available in the market but you need to choose any one of the most efficient and popular edible printers amongst other.
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Recent Study Shows the Effects of 3D Printing on Processed Cheese

Recent Study Shows the Effects of 3D Printing on Processed Cheese | 3D Food  Printing | Scoop.it
Sometimes, nothing can make a bad day better than a glass of wine at the end of it, paired with a plate of good cheese and crackers, of course; if I had my way, I’d eat Havarti all the time…and Brie…and muenster…and mozzarella…I may have a problem.
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3D Printed Food: The Future of Healthy Eating | Chloe Rutzerveld | TEDxYYC

Food Designer Chloé Rutzerveld is not impressed by the current 3D food printing hype in which the printers are basically being used as shaping machines to tr...

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The US Army wants to 3D-print customized food for soldiers

The US Army wants to 3D-print customized food for soldiers | 3D Food  Printing | Scoop.it

The military wants to "customize nutrition" for each soldier in the next few decades, and it's betting on 3-d printers to do it.

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Food-Printing Pop-Ups : Printing Food

Food-Printing Pop-Ups : Printing Food | 3D Food  Printing | Scoop.it
Printing Food - As 3D printing and pop-up shops are two things that are very of-the-moment, the organizers of the London 3D Printshow decided to bring them togethe...
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3D food printers could end famine, says academic Vivek Wadhwa

3D food printers could end famine, says academic Vivek Wadhwa | 3D Food  Printing | Scoop.it
It may sound far-fetched but 3D food printers could one day play a pivotal role in eradicating famine, says one of the most influential people in the technology world, Vivek Wadhwa.
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4 human challenges for 3D food printing - 3Digital Cooks

4 human challenges for 3D food printing - 3Digital Cooks | 3D Food  Printing | Scoop.it
“4 human challenges for 3D food printing.”
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Robot restaurants and sci-fi kitchens: How tech is changing the way we eat - Feature - TechRepublic

Robot restaurants and sci-fi kitchens: How tech is changing the way we eat - Feature - TechRepublic | 3D Food  Printing | Scoop.it
Robot recipes, 3D printed meals, pocket scanners, touch-screen waiters -- new futuristic technologies are beginning to transform the way we prepare, distribute, and eat our food.
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The Inventor of the 3D Printer Is Stoked on the Future of 3D-Printed Food

The Inventor of the 3D Printer Is Stoked on the Future of 3D-Printed Food | 3D Food  Printing | Scoop.it
A legend in his own right, the 74-year-old Californian not only revolutionized industrial production with the 3D printer, he created a brand new path for a new industry that is continually—and creat… (Motherboard The Inventor of the 3D Printer Is ...
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A German company is printing food for the elderly

A German company is printing food for the elderly | 3D Food  Printing | Scoop.it
Food printer creates food that quickly dissolves when eaten to help those with the inability to swallow (3D printer makes "melt-in-your-mouth" food for elderly patients with dysphagia (the inability to swallow).
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3D Food Printing Market Foreseen to Grow Exponentially over 2016-2026 – SAT Press Releases

3D Food Printing Market Foreseen to Grow Exponentially over 2016-2026 – SAT Press Releases | 3D Food  Printing | Scoop.it
3D Food Printing Market Foreseen to Grow Exponentially over 2016-2026 https://t.co/WzFzV7rTb2
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Top 5 3D Food Printers Futuristic Kitchen Tools 2017

Top 5 3D Food Printers - Futuristic Kitchen Tools 2017 Product Links: 3D PASTA PRINTER: https://goo.gl/nTMjBF Foodini - A 3D Food Printer
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3D Printing Poses Opportunities in Space, Food and Everything in Between

3D Printing Poses Opportunities in Space, Food and Everything in Between | 3D Food  Printing | Scoop.it
With growing interest in additive manufacturing in food, tools in space, and housing construction 3D printing is worth exploring further.
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Study on 3D cheese printing offers possibilities

Study on 3D cheese printing offers possibilities | 3D Food  Printing | Scoop.it
A study led by researchers at the School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University College Cork in Ireland, says 3D printing of processed cheese has implications for customized nutrition.
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Let's Cut to the Cheese: Researchers Publish Study on How 3D Printing Affects the Structure and Texture of Processed Cheese

Let's Cut to the Cheese: Researchers Publish Study on How 3D Printing Affects the Structure and Texture of Processed Cheese | 3D Food  Printing | Scoop.it
Sometimes, nothing can make a bad day better than a glass of wine at the end of it, paired with a plate of good cheese and crackers, of course; if I had my way, I'd eat Havarti all the time...and Brie...and muenster...and mozzarella...I may have a problem.
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3D-printing with living organisms "could transform the food industry"

Food designer Chloé Rutzerveld has developed a concept for "healthy and sustainable" 3D-printed snacks that sprout plants and mushrooms for flavour. Rutzerve...

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Bon Appetito ! World first for Barilla at EXPO2015 3D Printed Pasta

Bon Appetito ! World first for Barilla at EXPO2015  3D Printed Pasta | 3D Food  Printing | Scoop.it
EXPO2015 in Milan sees the presentation of a prototype pasta printer, co-developed by Barilla and TNO, that is capable of printing three-dimensional (3D) pasta ...
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Combining a future vision on food with one of my favorite dishes: Pasta!

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3-D Printing Hershey Kisses

May 7 -- Traditional food purveyors Hershey and the Culinary Institute of America take a step into the future, experimenting with 3-D food printing. From Hershey ...
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Why 3D food printing is more than just a novelty; it's the future of food

Why 3D food printing is more than just a novelty; it's the future of food | 3D Food  Printing | Scoop.it
3D printing has already taken off, but 3D food printing offers a host of revolutionary benefits that are only beginning to be explored and understood.
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Life In 2064: Urban, Longer, Maybe Neverending

Life In 2064: Urban, Longer, Maybe Neverending | 3D Food  Printing | Scoop.it
That an octopus called Paul had a better success rate than Goldman Sachs when predicting World Cup results (credit to the Wall Street Journal for the headline “Octopus Beats Vampire Squid”) tells you something about the wisdom of guessing the future in public. Guessing what the world will look like in 50 years’ time, however, is pretty safe, as I won’t be here to see myself proved wrong. Or will I? If Google’s director of engineering has his way, we’ll all be around indefinitely – in the cloud at least. AI (artificial intelligence) guru Ray Kurzweil is one of a number of technologists, inventors and futurists who believe that the ability to upload our minds to the web, create virtual bodies, and thereby live forever, is within touching distance. Kurzweil invented the first flat-bed scanning and optical character recognition systems, foresaw the internet explosion and correctly predicted that a computer would beat a chess Grandmaster by the turn of the century. The 66-year-old thinks we’ll achieve digital immortality as soon as 2045, and takes 150 supplements a day as part of his efforts to get himself across the line. Whether or not his vision for humanity (“increasingly non-biological to the point where the non-biological part dominates and the biological part is not important any more”) appeals to everyone is another matter. Our trend-watching consultancy The Futures Company groups various technology-led enhancements in human capacity (of which “mind uploading” is perhaps the most extreme example) under the label “cognitive enrichment”. Developments in real-time translation (think Google Translate, without the gobbledegook) are expected to break down cultural barriers and foster greater collaboration. Microsoft has already launched a real-time translation app for Skype. Artificial intelligence is no longer a sci-fi writer’s dream but part of our everyday lives: from aviation and manufacturing to medicine and computer games. More than that, AI is on the verge of becoming self-operative and self-sustaining. Most of the major car makers say they’ll have at least semi-autonomous vehicles on the market by 2020, and researchers believe that robots will have been promoted from the production line to running their own businesses by 2050. J Walker Smith, executive chairman of The Futures Company, predicts that – as we move from screens to sensors as the chief user interface – people will become less actively engaged with technology while simultaneously getting more of what they want. He calls this the “pivot to passive” and argues that it will be as big a change as the rise of the internet itself. The driverless car is the most talked-about example of the phenomenon and the benefits it could bring. You give up control to the machine, it takes you where you want to go, and you get to do other things on the way. In Smith’s words, “consumers are spending the currency of control for a superior value proposition.” Self-driving cars are just the beginning: their equivalent is “coming to every category” – from vending machines that recognise your face and remember what you like, to headphones that know what you want to listen to before you do. Our relationship with technology looks set to be transformed once again. Cognitive enrichment is one of several universal “mega-trends” that forecasters believe will define the next 50 years. Another of them, closely connected to the preoccupations of Ray Kurzweil and his colleagues, is ageing. The world is getting older: we are living longer than ever before, and older people represent an increasing percentage of the global population. The UN expects that the number of people aged 60 or over will more than double, from 841 million globally in 2013 to more than two billion in 2050. At the current rate, the over-60s will outnumber children for the first time in 2047. This relentless demographic shift presents challenges for governments across the world, which will have to find new ways to secure the health and wealth of an ever-expanding grey army. In the commercial arena it will mean big changes for brands and marketers, with lower growth in demand for products consumed by younger households alongside ever-greater demand for products consumed by older people. As life expectancy rises and retirement dates stretch into the distance there will be particularly strong growth in products and services that keep older consumers active and productive. Medical businesses will experience a boom: from laboratory-grown organs to robotics, medical tourism and drugs to boost mental capacity. Many will be cheered by the promise of longer life, but if your dream is to retire to the country, you might be disappointed. A third mega-trend is urbanisation, and a resulting concentration of people and resources unlike anything we’ve seen before (as IBM’s Smarter Planet and Cities campaigns foresaw). The UN says that by the middle of the century the world’s urban population will be as big as the world’s total population was in 2002. As we become more urban, cities will begin to displace states and regions as the entities that matter most in the global economy (London is already doing this). McKinsey estimates that the world’s top 100 cities will account for 35% of global GDP growth between now and 2025. In this environment, national governments will find it harder than ever to exercise authority over such dominant cities and the transnational businesses that operate from them. The cities themselves will look very different, as massive population increases force the adoption of new models for transport, food production and retail. “Proximity retailing” (local convenience stores) and e-commerce giants such as Amazon and Alibaba will disintermediate the traditional “big-box” retailers. Home delivery will ultimately supplant in-store browsing as consumers’ favourite way to shop, as the remaining barriers to a seamless experience are lifted by innovations like 3D home printing, Amazon’s delivery drones and Google’s same-day Shopping Express service. Talking about 3D printing, its wider application in manufacturing will reduce demand for labour, carrying implications for future employment levels. Like shoppers, food will have smaller distances to travel as its production moves from the countryside to population centres. The New Scientist reports that “vertical farms” are “sprouting all over the world” as warehouses and high-rises are used to grow fruit and vegetables. The giant cities of the future will look to become increasingly food self-sufficient, driving rapid growth in urban agriculture. So where does all that leave us in 50 years’ time? Frankly, who knows? I’ve not even touched on other mega-trends like the rise of non-Western economies and the effects of climate change, which will also reshape the world in ways we can only imagine today. How to predict, for example, the long-term effects of the unstoppable ascent of the 21st century’s two great Eastern powers? 2028 may be the year to watch. According to the Centre for Economics and Business Research, it’s when China will overtake the US as the world’s largest economy and India leapfrogs Japan. It’s also the year that the People’s Republic will itself be overtaken, by India, as the world’s most populous country. Not even Goldman Sachs or clairvoyant cephalopods can be certain of the future (Paul called it wrong in the final of Euro 2008). But on our present trajectory some things do seem inevitable: we’ll be urban, older and so entwined with technology that it may be hard to see where we end, and it begins.
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Nestle Researches 3D Food Printing - 3D Printing Industry

Nestle Researches 3D Food Printing - 3D Printing Industry | 3D Food  Printing | Scoop.it
After its largest competitor, Hershey, teamed up with 3D Systems to develop 3D printed chocolate and non-chocolate products, Nestle has decided to up the 3D printing ante.  The company’s research division, the Nestle Institute of Health Sciences...
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Foodini 3D Food Printer, The Founders, The Technology, And Their ...

Foodini 3D Food Printer, The Founders, The Technology, And Their ... | 3D Food  Printing | Scoop.it
food-feat. Co-founders Lynette Kucsma & Emilio Sepulveda. We have seen dozens of 3D Printers seek funding on the various crowdfunding platforms. Whether on Kickstarter, Indiegogo, or the dozens of other platforms out ...
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