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Scoop.it joins Linkfluence to become a leading global social intelligence company

Scoop.it joins Linkfluence to become a leading global social intelligence company | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it
It has been 7 years since we started the Scoop.it adventure. From the very beginning when Scoop.it was a simple innovative content curation tool to the powerful comprehensive content monitoring suite we offer today, from our first few beta testers to the 5+ million users we now have, and from being an early-stage startup to [...]
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What Makes a Great Place to Work? Here's What Thousands of Employees Said

What Makes a Great Place to Work? Here's What Thousands of Employees Said | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

Employee engagement measures the strength of the mental and emotional connection workers feel toward their places of occupation. Those measurements have reached new highs this year. Among participating companies, 74.2 percent of workers are highly engaged, compared with 72.1 percent in last year's data set.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, July 11, 11:25 PM

Flexible hours, gym time, and unlimited vacation days: these are the perks that drive the best workplaces.

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Jeff Bezos Banned PowerPoint in Meetings. His Replacement Is Brilliant

Jeff Bezos Banned PowerPoint in Meetings. His Replacement Is Brilliant | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

In his 2018 annual letter, Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos repeated his rule that PowerPoint is banned in executive meetings. What Bezos replaced it with provides even more valuable insight for entrepreneurs and leaders.

 

In his letter, and in a recent discussion at the Forum on Leadership at the Bush Center, Bezos revealed that "narrative structure" is more effective than PowerPoint. According to Bezos, new executives are in for a culture shock in their first Amazon meetings. Instead of reading bullet points on a PowerPoint slide, everyone sits silently for about 30 minutes to read a "six-page memo that's narratively structured with real sentences, topic sentences, verbs, and nouns."

 

After everyone's done reading, they discuss the topic. "It's so much better than the typical PowerPoint presentation for so many reasons," Bezos added.


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Maggie Lawlor's curator insight, May 27, 5:38 AM
So true and so important if you want to have an impact!
HOME GIRAFFE's curator insight, May 28, 2:44 AM

A very interesting insight into the mind of one of the richest men in the world. Slightly different thinking and a willingness to take a different approach is what separates those who are successful from those who aren't.

Cherryl Cooley's curator insight, May 30, 5:51 PM
Poets are natural storytellers. Most of the time, their craft is hard wired for narrative. Jeff Bezos tells you why you should have a poet on your payroll. And if you can't outright hire a poet, contract [her] to guide your team through its best organizational storytelling.
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How To Ask For A Referral Without Sounding Entitled Or Desperate

How To Ask For A Referral Without Sounding Entitled Or Desperate | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

If you’re close to somebody connected to the company–be it a friend, family member, or former colleague–you’re in luck. Assuming you have a good relationship, they will probably be happy to help you out.

 

“Be honest with them. Tell them what it is you’re ultimately looking for, and give them an idea of how they can help you,” recommends career coach Carlota Zimmerman.

 

Keep in mind, though, that a request for a referral–even when asking a close friend–is not a guarantee that you’ll receive one. If somebody can’t vouch for your work quality, they may not be comfortable putting themselves on the line for you. Because of this, it’s polite to give somebody an out, says Roy Cohen, career coach and author of The Wall Street Professional’s Survival Guide.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, May 10, 6:49 AM

Referrals are a great way to get an “in” at a company. But you should always be tactful about asking for it.

HOME GIRAFFE's curator insight, May 22, 3:05 AM

Check out this great article I found on Scoopit.

As a business owner myself I found it quite insightful.

 

We have many clients, and they are all happy, and we realise that word of mouth is the best way to grow. But asking for referrals is never easy.

 

Thanks for writing this article and giving us some tips to help us out.

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13 Mental Habits Leaders With Emotional Intelligence Will Avoid Like the Plague

13 Mental Habits Leaders With Emotional Intelligence Will Avoid Like the Plague | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

How a leader thinks and then reacts to things is crucial for success. High-functioning, emotionally intelligent leaders can be trusted because their thinking patterns mostly lead to behaviors that foster mutual trust, respect, and inclusiveness.

 

On the flip side, dysfunctional thinking patterns of bosses lacking emotional intelligence, in my experience, almost always lead to poor decision making. These thought patterns hold them back, destroy trust with others, and damage relationships in the workplace.

 


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 17, 12:24 AM

A good first lesson to grow as a leader is to step back and inspect how your thinking patterns impact others.

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Your Compliance Training Sucks, And Here’s How To Fix It

Your Compliance Training Sucks, And Here’s How To Fix It | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

It’s kind of amazing that you clicked on an article with “compliance training” in the headline, such is the revulsion with which that experience is typically–and often deservedly–greeted. But it’s a good thing you did. The policies covered in most compliance-training programs are extremely important for keeping the organization from violating laws and regulations, not to mention preserving a safe, inclusive work culture.

 

So it’s all the bigger shame that the way employees tend to be taught about those policies is frequently so tedious and rarely leads the desired outcomes. Here’s why–and what it takes to rethink a more effective training experience.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 6, 12:02 AM

Most HR training is memorable only for being unpleasant and tedious. That’s a real problem.

Thiranya Ravi's curator insight, April 8, 12:23 PM
Do you have plans to start your business, Know these profitable startup ideas https://goo.gl/9rvFRS in 2018? 
20 Startup Ideas: Best Profitable Business to earn money
 
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How To Stay Focused When You Have A Flexible Schedule

How To Stay Focused When You Have A Flexible Schedule | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

Ah, autonomy. Isn’t it grand? No defined time when you have to arrive at the office. No guilt over having to leave early for your kid’s recital. And if you’re not feeling well or the roads are bad, no problem–just work from home.

 

But is it ever really that simple? After all, other things become more salient when you’re working from home, like that pile of laundry that needs to get done, or a plethora of mindless daytime TV viewing options. That’s one issue with autonomy–it’s entirely up to you to get your stuff done. You have to set your own deadlines and hold yourself accountable to deliverables, because no one is looking over your shoulder.

 

Perhaps it’s a mixed blessing. According to the National Workplace Flexibility Study, 98% of managers who implement a flexible work schedule see no negative drawbacks. Rather, they see results like better communication, interaction, and productivity. So, it’s not that simple–managing a flexible schedule requires a strong balance of managerial trust and personal accountability.

 

But what does the latter look like? How can you still manage to get stuff done with the boundaries that many of us became accustomed to before we had this kind of autonomy? As it turns out, it’s more than possible–and we’ve got a few tips.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 18, 10:02 PM

It can be harder to stay productive when you work your own hours, so it’s up to you to set boundaries that allow you to do your best work.

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8 Easy Workspace Fixes to Improve Productivity, Mood, Creativity, and Health

8 Easy Workspace Fixes to Improve Productivity, Mood, Creativity, and Health | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

Yesterday I walked into my home office and examined the space from a fresh perspective. It hasn't had a facelift in about ten years and I've hardly noticed its dingy appearance. Don't get me wrong, I love my office but it's simply out of date and no longer reflects my personality. It's time for a change.

 

Approaching the challenge like any diligent, problem-solving coach, I did my research. What does science say about an office space that boosts energy, creativity, and productivity, all while projecting a safe, calm feeling for clients? Yes, it's possible, and you can do it all on your own. Here's what I've learned.

1. Use color, but not just any color.

Color psychology studies (and there are many) reveal changes in the body and brain when people view certain colors. These changes influence productivity, creativity, health, stress levels, focus, communication, and emotions. That's some powerful influence!

 

Color psychologist Angela Wright explains the phenomenon this way: "Color travels to us on wavelengths of photons from the sun. Those are converted into electrical impulses that pass to the part of the brain known as the hypothalamus, which governs our endocrine system and hormones, and much of our activity."

 

First decide what's most important about how color affects you, your employees, and your visitors. In an interview with Chris Bailey, Wright offered this simple breakdown of the effects of color on the mind: "The four psychological primaries are: red, blue, yellow, and green. And they affect the body (red), the mind (blue), the emotions, the ego, and self-confidence (yellow), and the essential balance between the mind, the body, and the emotions (green)." But it's not that simple. Bailey nicely breaks down the process of choosing just the right color in this article.


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CCM Consultancy's curator insight, March 12, 5:39 AM

Color psychology studies (and there are many) reveal changes in the body and brain when people view certain colors. These changes influence performance, creativity, health, stress levels, focus, communication, and emotions. That's some powerful influence!

Martin Mekatrig's curator insight, March 13, 3:58 PM
Use Spring cleaning to do more than giving your workspace a good dusting, throwing out piles of no longer relevant printouts and magazines,  and fishing out those chocolate wrappers, forgotten coffee mugs and apple cores.

Why not give it a fresh makeover, a change of color, a little rearranging, update the wall decor.
Fresh surroundings = fresh outlook = fresh ideas = fresh business.

You'll feel better and perform better.

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Stephen Rose's curator insight, March 15, 3:53 PM
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Lessons From Social Psychology To Apply In The Workplace

Lessons From Social Psychology To Apply In The Workplace | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

Running a successful organization requires lots of moving pieces running smoothly in tandem. At the heart of every organization are people just like you and me, whose performance can be influenced in a positive direction. Recently, companies like Google and Facebook have been redefining the standards of workplace culture, and in turn seeing improvements in employee satisfaction and company performance. Now, your company might not be large enough to have a dedicated HR (or “People Ops”) department, but there are some exciting takeaways from social psychology that you can apply to benefit your business.

 

Reciprocity Principle

Reciprocity is one of the famous “Six Principles of Persuasion” defined in Robert B. Cialdini, Ph.D.'s book, Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion. The idea is that we feel pressure to repay others for what they have given us or done for us. We often even give back more than we were initially given to minimize any guilt associated with the initial favor.

 

Founders and CEOs can use this to their advantage. Internally, this can help improve or repair work relationships, win over co-workers and build consensus. As Dr. Cialdini writes, reciprocity is so powerful that it can overcome feelings of suspicion or dislike toward the person who gives the gift or favor. As a small business owner, how about giving gifts or bonuses on holidays or birthdays? You could also offer to bring back coffee for the office or surprise your colleagues with breakfast or lunch. A kind gesture can go a long way.

 

Outside the office, the reciprocity principle can help you succeed in negotiations, build valuable business partnerships and win over investors — or even customers! When we launched our product and were at our first trade show full of retail managers and buyers, we realized that people only stopped at our booth if we handed them a free sample. So we handed samples to everyone who walked by! In turn, they stopped, listened to our pitch, and 99% of the time they placed an order for their store. In those first few hours, we sold over 100 cases into 100 new stores.


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Dr. Helen Teague's curator insight, March 6, 9:56 PM
From original scoop: "Running a successful organization requires lots of moving pieces running smoothly in tandem. At the heart of every organization are people just like you and me, whose performance can be influenced in a positive direction. Recently, companies like Google and Facebook have been redefining the standards of workplace culture, and in turn seeing improvements in employee satisfaction and company performance. Now, your company might not be large enough to have a dedicated HR (or “People Ops”) department, but there are some exciting takeaways from social psychology that you can apply to benefit your business. Reciprocity Principle Reciprocity is one of the famous “Six Principles of Persuasion” defined in Robert B. Cialdini, Ph.D.'s book, Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion. The idea is that we feel pressure to repay others for what they have given us or done for us. We often even give back more than we were initially given to minimize any guilt associated with the initial favor. Founders and CEOs can use this to their advantage. Internally, this can help improve or repair work relationships, win over co-workers and build consensus. As Dr. Cialdini writes, reciprocity is so powerful that it can overcome feelings of suspicion or dislike toward the person who gives the gift or favor. As a small business owner, how about giving gifts or bonuses on holidays or birthdays? You could also offer to bring back coffee for the office or surprise your colleagues with breakfast or lunch. A kind gesture can go a long way. Outside the office, the reciprocity principle can help you succeed in negotiations, build valuable business partnerships and win over investors — or even customers! When we launched our product and were at our first trade show full of retail managers and buyers, we realized that people only stopped at our booth if we handed them a free sample. So we handed samples to everyone who walked by! In turn, they stopped, listened to our pitch, and 99% of the time they placed an order for their store. In those first few hours, we sold over 100 cases into 100 new stores."
To Let's curator insight, March 7, 11:46 AM

nice content - we at tolet digital agency  apply your concept.

sometime the ideal work to list and associate with property owners across the globe can be quite something. visit our website today and list your properties form any location across the globe as we keep lessons from social psychology at our work place.

CCM Consultancy's curator insight, March 11, 5:34 AM

Reciprocity is one of the famous “Six Principles of Persuasion” defined in Robert B. Cialdini, Ph.D.'s book, Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion. The idea is that we feel pressure to repay others for what they have given us or done for us. We often even give back more than we were initially given to minimize any guilt associated with the initial favor.

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To Reduce Burnout on Your Team, Give People a Sense of Control

To Reduce Burnout on Your Team, Give People a Sense of Control | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

There’s no question or debate that workplace stress levels are at critical levels and are escalating. The American Institute of Stress (AIS) reveals that 80% of us feel stress on the job and almost half say they need help in managing that stress.  The StressPulse survey by ComPsych, an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) provider, shows the main causes of that stress are:  1) workload (36%); 2) people issues (31%); 3) balancing professional and personal lives (20%); and 4) job security (8%).

 

Team dynamics are also a big deal when it comes to workplace stress, in terms of the way teams operate and how team members interact with each other. The above statistics show that team dynamics directly affect a whopping 92% of what causes the most stress. 

 

Being part of a team can be a quick road to disappointment, frustration, and burnout, especially when some team members work harder than others, when some are on time and others are consistently late, when there’s drama and tension resulting from gossip, and when team leaders play favorites.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 1, 10:28 PM

Create a team charter.

Kim Colwell's curator insight, March 4, 10:09 PM
I've personally experienced this burnout. It's a tough one.  It's often difficult to find the courage to call it out and do something to try and change. What I found is if you have a job that on it's own has stress, just based on the nature of the job, and you add on demanding management and peers who you don't click with you are in a really difficult situation.  As mentioned in the article, team dynamics are a really huge ingredient in making a successful work environment and ultimately a successful business.    
1
Tom Wojick's curator insight, April 10, 8:03 PM

Human factors are significant contributors to accidents and injuries and stress is a factor that affects all humans. The right amount of stress can assist performance and  too much stress can can create the conditions for decreased performance and an increase in the chances for an accident or injury. 

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Emotionally Intelligent Ways To Express These 5 Feelings At Work

Emotionally Intelligent Ways To Express These 5 Feelings At Work | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

You’ve heard by now that you need to be “transparent” and “authentic” and to “bring your whole self” to work. More often than not, these phrases are shorthand for expressing your feelings. But while it’s true that you need an emotionally intelligent approach both to build a great work culture and to advance your own career, there’s more to it than just wearing your feelings on your sleeve.

 

Showing emotional savvy isn’t only about candor, though that’s certainly part of it. Properly channeling your emotions in the workplace is a powerful leadership skill. With that in mind, here’s how to calibrate and convey five of the most common emotions you’re likely to experience at work.


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CCM Consultancy's curator insight, February 19, 5:38 AM

When your fear stems from confronting a higher-up, remember that title and rank don’t define leadership. The more you speak up and show confidence in the face of authority, the more leadership you’ll be able to project despite your underlying nervousness.

Graphics Design's curator insight, February 19, 10:19 AM

Are despite everything you Confused on the choosing the best Custom Brochure Design Company ..? Kool Design Maker is a standout amongst other Brochure Design Company Which gave you the Custom Brochure Design Services at shabby and reasonable rates with 100% fulfillment

Jerry Busone's curator insight, March 2, 12:34 PM

Hot topic these days and without a doubt high EQ moves the needle on more ways than one in every organization 

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Everyone Hates Setting Goals. Here's How Google Makes It Easier for Its Employees

Everyone Hates Setting Goals. Here's How Google Makes It Easier for Its Employees | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

It's that time of year--leaders everywhere are charging employees with the task of establishing goals for 2018. If you've never been through a structured process, this exercise can be daunting, and frankly, feel like a big waste of time. I can assure you, it's not. 

 

Setting goals is critical. Goals provide direction, help you focus, prioritize your time and energy, and ensure that you can objectively prove you've advanced the company's agenda.

 

But just any goal won't do. Research shows that goals are not only important but also that the level of specificity and difficulty matters. Goals that are both clear and challenging drive higher levels of performance.

 

To set their teams up for success, many organizations use SMART goals. Google leaders use something a little different--"Objectives and Key Results" (OKRs). On Google's re:Work site, a resource that shares the company's perspective on people operations, Google explains the concept.


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Kim Colwell's curator insight, February 14, 1:10 AM
This is a very interesting way to set goals.  I've heard of many different ways, however, have never been introduced to this.  I like the collaborative effort, the transparency, and the simplicity.  There are different templates that can be used.  I'm still reviewing what is out there I'm leaning towards Weekdone.  I can see the framework working not only as a company goal setting plan, it can work as a family or personal goal planning system. 
 
Heidi Freeman's curator insight, February 16, 3:53 PM

This could be a goal-setting technique that may work for you! Goal setting is a daunting task, but one we really need to master. OKR, Objective and Key Results, allows you to dream big and then figure out how you will measure your progress.

Ann Zaslow-Rethaber's curator insight, February 16, 5:28 PM

Interesting article from a company that clearly has had success in meeting their objectives.   

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How You Can Create A Schedule That Really Works For You

How You Can Create A Schedule That Really Works For You | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

hen it comes to our daily schedule, most people fall into one of two camps:

 

The over-scheduler: Their calendars look like a kindergartener’s finger painting. Meetings overlap meetings while reminders for events, breaks, tasks, and more meetings are going off like it’s New Year’s Eve. Their days are determined from the moment they wake up to their evening routine.

 

The minimalist: Also known as “The Dreamer.” They’ve got one or two recurring events, but a whole lot of whitespace so they’re “free” (at least on paper) for long stretches of work.

The problem is that both of these are terrible. For their own reasons.

 

Being over-scheduled leaves us no time for ourselves. The more “in control” we are of our calendar, the less control we feel like we have over our lives. Not to mention we’re notoriously bad at knowing how long tasks take us to do. When your schedule is this jammed, even going 15 minutes over on your morning task will throw your whole day out of whack.

 

And the minimalist? Well, they’re just living in la la land, aren’t they? They’ve offloaded their schedule to some other format–most likely a to-do list, scheduling app, or series of angry emails asking “Where is this?”

 

A good daily schedule is a blueprint for a successful life. Knowing what we’re doing and when empowers us with a sense of purpose, meaning, and focus.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, February 6, 10:47 PM

Don’t fall prey to under or over-scheduling.

David Stapleton's curator insight, February 8, 11:16 AM
Being over-scheduled leaves us no time for ourselves.
Harish Kumar's curator insight, February 8, 11:59 AM
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Leaders Focus Too Much on Changing Policies, and Not Enough on Changing Minds

Leaders Focus Too Much on Changing Policies, and Not Enough on Changing Minds | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

The same research found that nearly 75% of those transformations fail to improve business performance, either short-term or long-term.

 

So why is transformation so difficult to achieve?

 

Among many potential explanations, one that gets very little attention may be the most fundamental: the invisible fears and insecurities that keep us locked into behaviors even when we know rationally that they don’t serve us well.


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Satyam Saxena's comment, July 10, 6:41 AM
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Sanjeev Rangra's comment, July 10, 7:26 AM
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CCM Consultancy's curator insight, July 11, 6:41 AM

Business transformations are typically built around new structural elements, including policies, processes, facilities, and technology. Some companies also focus on behaviors — defining new practices, training new skills, or asking employees for new deliverables.

 

What most organizations typically overlook is the internal shift — what people think and feel — which has to occur in order to bring the strategy to life.

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How to Refocus Your Strategy and Reenergize Your Team

How to Refocus Your Strategy and Reenergize Your Team | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

A person's passion is the sincerest definition of who they are. Passion can manifest itself in a hobby, an aspiration, or if you're really lucky, a career. Take two people, Joe and Jane, as an example. Joe has a passion outside of his career. He devotes a lot of his free time to this passion and naturally speaks about it to his peers. When his peers think of him they probably define him as "person passionate about X." Now take Jane, one of the lucky few who has made a career out of her passion. She devotes twice the amount of time, twice the amount of energy and twice the amount of conversation to her passion. How do you think her peers define her?

If you've read Simon Sinek's bestseller Start With Why, then Jane will remind you of Herb Kelleher, co-founder of Southwest Airlines, or Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple Inc. Joe will remind you of the Wright Brothers. Each of these individuals built empires by undyingly following their passion. Sure, you can claim that these individuals are used as examples because of winner's bias. But they succeeded because not only were they extremely passionate. They succeeded because they were able to clearly communicate their visions.

I consider myself extremely lucky. Like Jane, I've built a career out of my passion. When I first launched my film production company, my team asked the same questions regarding our clients that our competition was asking:

What is this client doing that's different? What do they bring to the table? What problems are they solving for their customers?

While these questions helped us understand our clients, we realized they weren't getting to the core of what defined them. We were part of the same old convention of business. We were focusing on what our clients were doing and not why they were doing it in the first place. Once we realized this, we began asking ourselves different questions:

How can we harness the passion that defines the client's company to create a story? Are their employees inspired by that passion? Does the story align with their core values? How can we align the story with the company's brand mission? How is that story going to connect with their audience? How are we going to make the story authentic and engaging?
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, June 1, 7:49 AM

The beauty of these questions is that you can propose them to your clients, to your employees and even to yourself.

HOME GIRAFFE's curator insight, June 6, 6:02 AM

Check out this great article I found on Scoopit. Worth the time to sit and read.

CCM Consultancy's curator insight, July 2, 6:32 AM

A person's passion is the sincerest definition of who they are.

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3 Things Companies Do to Build an Exceptional Culture

3 Things Companies Do to Build an Exceptional Culture | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

Exceptional workplace doesn't happen by accident.  It starts with a clearly defined vision that includes the company's core values, a detailed description of what each of those values means on a day-to-day basis, and a system for measuring  whether or not the people in the organization are living those values.

I refer to this plan as a culture blueprint, and it's critical to the creation and scaling of your company's culture, just as an architect's plans are to the building of a skyscraper. Done correctly, it serves as a North Star to the senior management team as you hire and manage the company's workforce. Without it, you'll end up building something that's likely to collapse under its own weight.  


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, May 18, 1:56 AM

Top employers create a blueprint, treat HR like a sales organization and govern by meritocracy.

Ann Zaslow-Rethaber's curator insight, May 18, 6:52 PM

 

Company culture is incredibly important ,and far too many companies fail to invest the time and resources to create a positive one. 

 

Make no mistake ...every single company HAS a culture, regardless of weather you try to create one, or not. 

 

What is yours?

 

 

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How To Communicate With People Who Disagree With You

How To Communicate With People Who Disagree With You | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

We’ve all been there: those times you need to argue your point of view to someone who you know disagrees with you. You immediately go to your keyboard and start to type out that 280-character tweet, the Facebook reply, or a paragraphs-long email. Surely the reason, logic, and sheer power of your written words will convince whoever it is who disagrees with you to see your point of view? But new research suggests these written arguments may not be the best approach.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, May 10, 6:43 AM

Research suggests oral, not written, communication works best.

Yanglish's curator insight, May 14, 3:27 PM
...written arguments may not be the best approach.
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Why You Should Hire Emotionally Intelligent Employees

Why You Should Hire Emotionally Intelligent Employees | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

Perhaps you've heard the saying, "hire hard, manage easy." This implies that having a well thought-out hiring strategy can lead to on-boarding employees that best fit your company culture. This saying certainly holds true in today's age, where having a cohesive culture has become essential for a strong business.

 

Making a good hiring decision starts by creating a highly detailed and specific job description designed to flesh out the best applicants.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 10, 7:52 AM

Specific skills and experiences are only part of the hiring puzzle.

Thiranya Ravi's curator insight, April 10, 12:43 PM
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Tom Wojick's curator insight, April 10, 7:54 PM

There isn't a facet or aspect of any business were emotional intelligence isn't a positive contributor and factor in success. The ROI on EQ is well documented.

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How To Train Yourself To Take Feedback Well

How To Train Yourself To Take Feedback Well | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

With all the “be your best self now!” hullabaloo, we can get overwhelmed with what we think we should be doing. We can drive ourselves crazy thinking about all the things we could do to make ourselves smarter, stronger, better. Not long ago, I actually found myself surrounded by whiteboards sketching out all of my self-improvement plans for the year, kanban board style.

 

And while goals and growth plans are great, sometimes the best ideas for change come from an awareness outside of ourselves. I know, it sounds weird to hear a leadership coach telling you to look for something outside of yourself. I’m all about tuning into that courageous and all-knowing voice who can tout your fabulousness–it’s good stuff. But let’s get real: Sometimes the only way to get perspective about what needs to change comes from an outside perspective. Yes, believe it or not, there is often a gap between who we desire and think we are presenting to the world, and the way others see us.

 

Turns out that when you ask the people around you–the ones who see you in action every day and are impacted by the choices you make–where you can grow, their ideas might be a little different than your own.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 21, 9:56 PM

Receiving feedback is hard. Here are some tips on how you can be better at it.

Thiranya Ravi's curator insight, March 22, 11:41 AM
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CCM Consultancy's curator insight, March 26, 6:40 AM

The truth is, we can’t always control the feedback we receive; we can only control how we choose to accept and use it. And learning how to use it wisely can be a game changer.

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Forget Schmoozing, Here’s How To Get Influential People’s Attention

Forget Schmoozing, Here’s How To Get Influential People’s Attention | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

You probably know that powerful people receive dozens, if not hundreds, of unsolicited requests every day. And at networking events or speaking engagements, the most influential folks in the room usually have to fight back a scrum of people hoping to get a word in or hand off a business card. To get on their radar, you have to do more than cold email and hope for the best, or push your way to the front of the line at industry mixers.

 

The better way to connect with superstars isn’t to get in front of them and ask them for things. As Duke University professor and author Dorie Clark put it, “The world is competing for the attention of the most successful people,” she wrote for Harvard Business Review. “If you want to meet them–and break through and build a lasting connection–the best strategy is to make them come to you.” Here are a few ways to do that.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 13, 9:39 PM

Small talk and cold emailing will only take you so far, but these five tactics can get you noticed—and remembered—for all the right reasons.

CCM Consultancy's curator insight, March 18, 6:10 AM

The better way to connect with superstars isn’t to get in front of them and ask them for things. If you want to meet them–and break through and build a lasting connection–the best strategy is to make them come to you.” Here are a few ways to do that.

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Create a Growth Culture, Not a Performance-Obsessed One

Create a Growth Culture, Not a Performance-Obsessed One | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

Here’s the dilemma: In a competitive, complex, and volatile business environment, companies need more from their employees than ever. But the same forces rocking businesses are also overwhelming employees, driving up their fear, and compromising their capacity.

 

It’s no wonder that so many C-Suite leaders are focused on how to build higher performance cultures.  The irony, we’ve found, is that building a culture focused on performance may not be the best, healthiest, or most sustainable way to fuel results. Instead, it may be more effective to focus on creating a culture of growth.

 

A culture is simply the collection of beliefs on which people build their behavior. Learning organizations – Peter Senge’s term — classically focus on intellectually oriented issues such as knowledge and expertise.  That’s plainly critical, but a true growth culture also focuses on deeper issues connected to how people feel, and how they behave as a result. In a growth culture, people build their capacity to see through blind spots; acknowledge insecurities and shortcomings rather than unconsciously acting them out; and spend less energy defending their personal value so they have more energy available to create external value. How people feel – and make other people feel — becomes as important as how much they know.

 

Building a growth culture, we’ve found, requires a blend of individual and organizational components:

 

An environment that feels safe, fueled first by top by leaders willing to role model vulnerability and take personal responsibility for their shortcomings and missteps.A focus on continuous learning through inquiry, curiosity and transparency, in place of judgment, certainty and self-protection.Time-limited, manageable experiments with new behaviors in order to test our unconscious assumption that changing the status quo is dangerous and likely to have negative consequences.Continuous feedback – up, down and across the organization – grounded in a shared commitment to helping each other grow and get better.
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 8, 9:48 PM

You need four things to do it.

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6 Morning Habits (That Aren’t Meditation) That Help You Focus All Day

6 Morning Habits (That Aren’t Meditation) That Help You Focus All Day | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

You’ve probably experienced the frustration of being distracted at work. Perhaps you were pulled into a never-ending Slack discussion, and when it finally ended you struggled to focus on the task you were working on. Or a coworker criticized you, and now you can’t stop replaying his comments in your head.

 

It’s totally normal to lose focus after a period of time (which is why you should be taking regular breaks). But if you find yourself easily distracted throughout the day, you might want to consider tweaking some of your morning habits. They probably won’t eliminate all distractions, but you’ll at least start your workday strong building a good foundation for the rest of the day.


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Kim Colwell's curator insight, March 4, 11:18 PM
6 Morning Habits - very interesting!  I've never considered a couple of them.  The "Eat a Different Frog" is one of them.  I like the walking in the morning, although a really difficult one for me to do, while I'm a morning person the thought of walking in the rain really early in the morning is not appealing. The cold shower suggesting, hmmm, I may go for lukewarm perhaps that will help. 

 
Edwina Cooksley's curator insight, March 5, 3:09 AM

Everyone wants to be more productive. For me, morning habits are the most adaptable and useful habits to focus on.

Diva Ventures Best Blogs's curator insight, March 6, 1:14 AM

You’ve probably experienced the frustration of being distracted at work. Perhaps you were pulled into a never-ending Slack discussion, and when it finally ended you struggled to focus on the task you were working on. Or a coworker criticized you, and now you can’t stop replaying his comments in your head.

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15 Favorite Interview Questions to Completely Disarm Job Candidates (in a Really Good Way)

15 Favorite Interview Questions to Completely Disarm Job Candidates (in a Really Good Way) | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

Maybe your favorite interview question is one of the most common interview questions. Maybe it's one of the most common behavioral interview questions. Or maybe you have a less conventional interview question you like to ask, like those asked by these company founders and CEOs.

 

What is your favorite interview question? To find out, we asked the Inc. community on LinkedIn to provide their favorites, as well as their reasons why. Below are some of the responses; go here and here to see them all.

 

1. "What is the hardest thing you've ever done?"

 

The answer can be personal or professional. What the candidate accomplished isn't as important as how -- and why. What were the hurdles? What were the roadblocks? Did the candidate seek help? Does the candidate credit the people who helped?

 

The answer also can provide insight into how the candidate defines "hard," and how their perspective align with the challenges your business faces.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, February 25, 10:53 PM

We asked readers for their favorite interview questions -- and we weren't disappointed.

FlashWebsiteHeader's curator insight, February 26, 9:21 AM

A few people have however grumbled that blaze flash website header design does not work. They say that the glimmer film takes too long to load, thus the vast majority will end up anxious and leave. To be honest, this is consistent with some degree. However, in all actuality, there are approaches to maintain a strategic distance from this. For example, rather than influencing the entire motion picture to stack at one time, the creator could separate it into parts.

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Can eLearning Change Behaviour? (or eLearning made me a healthy person)

Can eLearning Change Behaviour? (or eLearning made me a healthy person) | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

Confession – I have been going to naturopaths for 40 years, but I am terrible at taking tablets, potions and sprays. I start out Day 1 with the greatest of intentions but after Day 3, I am over taking something everyday but that all changed not so long ago.

 

Having been involved in Learning all my life and now running an eLearning company, (The Learning Factor), I’ve always wondered two things:

Can eLearning (on-line learning) actually change behaviour?Can a 12-minute eLearning module have a lasting impact on daily life?

 

One of our clients is an Australian health supplements company. They engaged our company to build a global learning platform and work with their teams in developing numerous engaging and educational eLearning courses.

 

Having a passion for excellence and always want to make sure the eLearning quality we produce has the WOW factor, I began do my own review on some of the modules we developed for them. The modules were on things like Probiotics, B Vitamins, Brain Health, Heart Health, Fish Oil.

 

I was only doing the reviews of the modules for quality control but all of a sudden, my behaviour changed, I found myself asking my wife to buy these products and I started taking them religiously.

 

The eLearning modules had a major effect on my life, they had in fact changed my behaviour. Through the learning I saw the WHY and the WIFM. I think the vignettes and the animations really crystallised in my mind and emotions that these tablets were going to make me healthier and stronger as I continued through my life.

 

Now every morning I wake, shower, shave and swallow – 12 tablets to keep me healthy. It’s not that I have to do it, I want to do this and I’ve been doing it for over a year. I even took all my tablets on a recent cruise to Alaska in little bags, one for each day!  

Can eLearning change behaviour? For me it’s a big YES!

 

Chris Gaborit is managing director of The Learning Factor, an eLearning company who loves technology linked to learning. Follow him here on Linkedin, on Twitter @droneservicesAU and Instagram @idronefoto


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, February 13, 9:44 PM

 Having a passion for excellence and always want to make sure the eLearning quality we produce has the WOW factor, I began do my own review on some of the modules we developed for them.

Harish Kumar's curator insight, February 14, 12:40 PM
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Our Obsession With Working Hard Is Ruining Our Productivity

Our Obsession With Working Hard Is Ruining Our Productivity | Food and Beverage Management | Scoop.it

What do you really need to get ahead at work?

 

I get asked this all the time. The answer varies depending on the person, their goals, and my mood, but there’s one answer I’ll never give: “Work hard.” That’s not an oversight or a misstep. It’s very intentional.

 

Whenever I hear some public speaker or Silicon Valley personality talk about how it just takes hard work to really succeed, I can’t help but roll my eyes a little. I’m sick of hearing people talk about working hard, keeping busy, putting their head down, etc. We’ve become too preoccupied with “the grind,” and it’s actually bringing us down.


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Jerry Busone's curator insight, February 9, 1:23 PM

Most people do idle work and the working hard becomes working hard... Good read . 

Maggie Lawlor's curator insight, February 10, 12:39 AM
“Working hard” and being “busy” need to be re-examined as standards we aspire to (just think about how most people respond when you ask them how they are!). Creative, innovative knowledge workers need “down time” to stay aware of shifts in the world, be in touch with what’s unfolding and harness their insights to keep their organizations agile and in step with rapidly emerging change. 
Ian Berry's curator insight, February 13, 2:52 AM
I don't leave anything in the tank yet the more I use concepts like 'deep' work' and essentialism ("less but better") the more I accomplish in less time