Florida Friendly Gardening
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Topics of interest to Florida Gardeners, new and old.
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A CANNIBAL AMONG US

A CANNIBAL AMONG US | Florida Friendly Gardening | Scoop.it
Lurking in the shadows of Florida’s lawns and gardens is a monster that must be stopped. Because of his cannibalistic nature, he’s consuming the native anole and green tree frog population in our state. This cannibal, Osteopilus Septentrionalis, is more commonly known as a Cuban Tree frog. A native of Cuba, the Bahamas and the Cayman Islands, this deadly predator was introduced to South Florida in the early 20th century via shipments from its’ native habitat in the islands.

This frog can grow to more than six inches long. Unlike the much smaller native green species, the Cuban Tree Frogs are usually creamy white to light brown. Their eyes are large and their skin is rough to the touch and coated with a secretion that irritates mucus membranes. They easily adapt to residential areas. These visitors can be found in most areas in Florida. There have even been reports of sightings in Southern Georgia as well. They can be found inside pipes, behind objects hung on walls or wooden fences, inside birdhouses and even burrowed down into the soil on top of potted plants.

Research suggests they eliminate native species of tree frogs and anoles by devouring them and they are rapidly becoming established in natural areas. There have even been reports of blackouts and damaged utilities equipment caused by these frogs when they create short-circuits.

There are, at present, no repellents available to stop the mayhem. We, as gardeners and caretakers of the wild places in Florida, must take the initiative. When you find one of these innocent looking creatures, protect your hands with gloves or a plastic bag. They can leap up to six feet. After you finally catch it, deposit the frog into a plastic bag, like a food storage bag, and place the bag inside the freezer. After twenty–four hours you can toss the carcass into the garbage. This is a very humane way of dealing with these predators. If there is any green in their color, it may be a native species. Check for the color – creamy white to light brown. Happy Hunting!

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Florida Living: Gardening in Small Spaces

Florida Living:  Gardening in Small Spaces You don't need acreage or a small farm for gardening in Florida either for flowers or some fresh vegetables for the dinner table.  Living in a warm climate in Florida, we are able to grow stuff almost...
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Gardening in Central Florida: my Evergreen Seeds order

I'm in the mood to try something new in my summer garden... I've grown Amaranth, which is really tasty and a breeze. It's been a long time since I've grown Malabar Spinach. And I'm intrigued by the description of the ...
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Florida Gardening Magazine

A review about Florida Gardening Magazine. Bi-monthly publication includes all gardening articles that might be useful for home gardeners in Florida.
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Gardening under the Florida sun: Happiness is....

Beach (17) chickens (34) cooking (26) Florida native plants (14) gardening (72) I love my Big Goober (2) I love my friends (2) Insects (17) Maggie and Jiggs (4) Maggie May (2) Maggie the chicken chaser (1) Ollie (6) ...
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