Active learning in Higher Education
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Metta = Storytelling + Polls In One Compact Format

Metta = Storytelling + Polls In One Compact Format | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Metta helps turning stories into short movies out of pictures, videos, text and sounds that are already published on the web. Polls and quizzes can also be embedded anywhere inside a video presentation to get controlled responses from viewers.

Via Baiba Svenca
Kim Flintoff's insight:

Integrates with EdModo - a useful tool for anyone looking at "flipping" strategies

 

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Ramon Pavia's curator insight, November 14, 2013 2:24 AM

It allows teachers and educators to produce learning guides

Ingrid Cristina Florence Yamine's curator insight, November 19, 2013 1:14 PM

very interesting and useful one! I'll preset on it next monday!

Philippe Trebaul's curator insight, March 28, 2016 11:35 PM
Baiba Svenca's insight:

Metta (which is the former Soo Meta) is a versatile web application that lets you create presentations with text, images, videos and voice recordings, as well as create polls and stories.


Metta is integrated in Edmodo. It is a great tool for flipped classrooms.

Active learning in Higher Education
Strategies for more effective student-centred, authentic engagement in the higher education context
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Pedagogies of Dissent

Pedagogies of Dissent | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Overview: This post combines two blog posts on engaged pedagogy originally published on hastac.org in June 2015 and October 2017.

The first post offers classic rationales for what is called “active learning” or  engaged, student-centered, or radical pedagogy. It then offers several specific methods, with details for how to make these work in your classroom, meetings, or social organizing. Some of these tactics go back to the “Freedom Schools,” some to Maria Montessori. It ends with a bibliography of useful theoretical and practical books and articles on these methods.

The second post answers the question posed to me by a friend: “But how do I teach a difficult text, such as Heidegger, using activist pedagogy?” The good news is that Heidegger, in What Is Called Thinking?, answered this question, falling down on the side of engaged pedagogy, what he called “letting-learn.” 

At the end, is a  bibliography of useful theoretical and practical books and articles on these methods.
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This Is What Understanding Looks Like

This Is What Understanding Looks Like | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

A Picture of 21st Century Learning 


 If you can, imagine a 21st century learning environment. Learners buzz about a classroom working on a project to improve local water quality. They are working within and across small groups with a staggering variety of media, from essays and reports to quick videos and social media streams, to understand the scale of the problem. 


They revisit old research from earlier in the year saved in Google Docs, review resources curated in Pearltrees during research for another project, and start concept-mapping potential approaches using Mindo. 


Rather than compliance or letter grades, designing elegant solutions to address important problems is what motivates them—little social entrepreneurs exploring through own interdependence with one another and community with digital tools. Among their challenges? Not only the problem itself, but collaboratively identifying the best way to present their ideas to diverse audiences that may or may not use technology. 


To accomplish this, they use Evernote to take quick notes, YouTube to better understand the water cycle, conversations with teachers to explore possibilities they might be missing–often anchored in a project-based learning framework. 


 They demonstrate a consistent pattern of reflection, deconstruction, and evolution of thought while bridging physical and digital audiences. 


Their pace is self-directed, and their resources would be immediately overwhelming without a plan. 


Their objectives, while clear, are always a kind of moving target.  


Task-swapping is constant, quick, adaptive thinking absolutely critical. 


These are the things that cause understanding; they’re also effects of understanding. This is the picture of 21st century learning. How this translates to multiple choice tests and short-answer response is unclear.

Kim Flintoff's insight:
If you can, imagine a 21st century learning environment. Learners buzz about a classroom working on a project to improve local water quality. They are working within and across small groups with a staggering variety of media, from essays and reports to quick videos and social media streams, to understand the scale of the problem.
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Against “reductionism”: envisioning each piece of writing in its own right, not as a version of something else

Against “reductionism”: envisioning each piece of writing in its own right, not as a version of something else | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
It’s not uncommon for authors to be asked to submit a shortened version of a research article or piece of writing. This, says Thomas Basbøll, is too often looked upon as a problem of “reduction”, of pruning a longer text. Rather, the enormous surplus of knowledge that the longer text demonstrates the author has is a material resource for producing a different, shorter text. By using a key-sentence outline, authors can plan and reorganise the longer text without setting a material constraint on the shorter one.

Sometimes a draft gets longer than we’d like. Sometimes we are asked for a text that is shorter than the one we’re working on. We’re writing a paper for a journal with an 8,000-word limit and before we know it we’ve written 10,000 words. Then we’re suddenly asked to submit an extended abstract on the same subject with a 1,500-word limit. The problem, we tell ourselves, is to “reduce” what we’ve got to something shorter. I want to offer an argument against this way of thinking.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
Sometimes a draft gets longer than we’d like. Sometimes we are asked for a text that is shorter than the one we’re working on. We’re writing a paper for a journal with an 8,000-word limit and before we know it we’ve written 10,000 words. Then we’re suddenly asked to submit an extended abstract on the same subject with a 1,500-word limit. The problem, we tell ourselves, is to “reduce” what we’ve got to something shorter. I want to offer an argument against this way of thinking.
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10 Characteristics of Learner Centered Experiences  

10 Characteristics of Learner Centered Experiences   | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Education Reimagined defines the paradigm shift from teacher-centered to learner-centered as shifting how we see learners and their critical role in their own learning now, and throughout their lives. The critical shift is that “Learners are seen and known as wondrous, curious individuals with vast capabilities and limitless potential. This paradigm recognizes that learning is…
Kim Flintoff's insight:
he critical shift is that “Learners are seen and known as wondrous, curious individuals with vast capabilities and limitless potential.
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Japan Might Be What Equality in Education Looks Like

Japan Might Be What Equality in Education Looks Like | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The country’s government makes sure areas with low income levels and property values get good teachers too.
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Deanna Mascle's curator insight, October 9, 9:08 AM
We could learn from this!
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Benefits Of Personalized eLearning – Featuring A Case Study For Instructional Designers - EIDesign

Benefits Of Personalized eLearning – Featuring A Case Study For Instructional Designers - EIDesign | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Highlights Of The Personalized eLearning Approach

Create learner-centered goals and objectives.
Assess online learners to identify knowledge gaps.
Offer timely, personalized eLearning feedback.
Provide constant online support.
Features Of The Personalized eLearning Approach At A Glance

Avatar selection/Role selection.
Pre-assessment on topics covered.
Range of educational pathways.
Personalized recommendations/feedback.
Re-directs learners for remediation and for good performance.
Provides resources for further exploration of knowledge.
Learners are informed and empowered.
Assessments are related to meaningful tasks.
Reduces the achievement gap.
Enhanced interaction between individual learners and individual teachers.
Facilitates the “community of learning” approach.
Instead of incorporating a linear navigation map, it offers online learners a clickable guide that features diverse eLearning activities and multimedia.
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I am begging. Please, just STOP testing children. – March For Public Education – Medium

I am begging. Please, just STOP testing children. – March For Public Education – Medium | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
To borrow Smizik’s words, standardized testing does not invest in teacher’s professional capacities. The craft of teaching is lost to the demands of helping students meet the test requirements. The loss of dynamic pedagogy is appalling. The use of modules and worksheets to discuss novels lacks creativity and leads to student disinterest. The disregard for the mastery of multiplication facts causes students to lack fluency in mathematics. (These are just two examples — teachers in every grade level can offer more.) New York and other states can change the name of the standards, but it does not change the outcome: students are overly tested using developmentally inappropriate standards with substandard outcomes.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
To borrow Smizik’s words, standardized testing does not invest in teacher’s professional capacities. The craft of teaching is lost to the demands of helping students meet the test requirements. The loss of dynamic pedagogy is appalling. The use of modules and worksheets to discuss novels lacks creativity and leads to student disinterest. The disregard for the mastery of multiplication facts causes students to lack fluency in mathematics. (These are just two examples — teachers in every grade level can offer more.) New York and other states can change the name of the standards, but it does not change the outcome: students are overly tested using developmentally inappropriate standards with substandard outcomes.
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Thinking Project Based Learning with the Buck Institute

Thinking Project Based Learning with the Buck Institute | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Today Rody Boonchouy @rodyboo from the Buck Institute talks about effective project based learning. With a powerful metaphor explaining the difference between projects and project based learning, Rody sets the stage to discuss PBL trends and tips. Let’s dive deeper into PBL.
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Making Personalized Learning Real - EdSurge News

Making Personalized Learning Real - EdSurge News | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Informing and feeding that vision should be deep knowledge—ideally research findings about how students learn, what shapes their readiness to learn and how those principles can be applied in tools to support learning. Digital Promise has devoted significant resources to showing the links between what we know—and how it gets implemented in school. For instance, the organization’s research map connects topics such as student motivation to published research frameworks and results.
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A New Kind of Classroom: No Grades, No Failing, No Hurry

A New Kind of Classroom: No Grades, No Failing, No Hurry | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Mastery-based learning allows students to learn at their own pace.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
Still largely a content driven model... what changes are necessary to the Mastery model to make it more relevant to the 21st Century and beyond?
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Fortifying Interest in a Distracted World

Fortifying Interest in a Distracted World | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

The roots of student interest are described in the KQED web site article, “How the Power of Interest Drives Learning”:

1        A seven-year-long study by Judith Harackiewicz showed that interest predicted long term learning outcomes more accurately than students’ initial grades in a course. In general, writes Harackiewicz, “research has found that interest is a more powerful predictor of future choices than prior achievement or demographic variables.”

2        The research of Paul Silvia suggests that to be interesting, material must be novel, complex, and comprehensible.

The first point implies that capturing and maintaining interest are vital to success, and that interest is perhaps the great leveler, as opposed to students’ existing assets.  Educators need to get this right. 

The second point provides plausible explanations for why we’re still challenged on the engagement front these days, in spite of the new tools.

Kim Flintoff's insight:

The first point implies that capturing and maintaining interest are vital to success, and that interest is perhaps the great leveler, as opposed to students’ existing assets.  Educators need to get this right.  


The second point provides plausible explanations for why we’re still challenged on the engagement front these days, in spite of the new tools.

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These educators know how to make PBL work for teachers

These educators know how to make PBL work for teachers | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Project-based learning (PBL) is a trend that’s spreading faster than a wildfire during a drought. Why? Because research on PBL proves that it increases student engagement and achievement, and helps students develop the 21st-century skills they need to succeed in their future careers.

For PBL to reach its full potential, though, educators must learn to step back and be facilitators in the classroom, a change that requires thoughtful and ongoing professional development. Here, three educators offer their insights on what it takes to roll out and support a successful PBL implementation.

Give Teachers Autonomy, Flexibility
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Situated Learning Theory (Lave)

Situated Learning Theory (Lave) | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Summary: Situated Learning Theory posits that learning is unintentional and situated within authentic activity, context, and culture.

Originator: Jean Lave[1]

Key Terms: Legitimate Peripheral Participation (LPP), Cognitive Apprenticeship

Situated Learning Theory (Lave)

In contrast with most classroom learning activities that involve abstract knowledge which is and out of context, Lave argues that learning is situated; that is, as it normally occurs, learning is embedded within activity, context and culture. It is also usually unintentional rather than deliberate. Lave and Wenger call this a process of “legitimate peripheral participation”[2].

Knowledge needs to be presented in authentic contexts — settings and situations that would normally involve that knowledge. Social interaction and collaboration are essential components of situated learning — learners become involved in a “community of practice” which embodies certain beliefs and behaviors to be acquired. As the beginner or novice moves from the periphery of a community to its center, he or she becomes more active and engaged within the culture and eventually assumes the role of an expert.

Kim Flintoff's insight:

Summary: Situated Learning Theory posits that learning is unintentional and situated within authentic activity, context, and culture.

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It's better to understand something than to know it

It's better to understand something than to know it | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

“Knowing” and “understanding” are related concepts, but they’re not the same. Each is a distinct mental state involving cognitive grasp: Knowing is static, referring to discrete facts, while understanding is active, describing the ability to analyze and place those facts in context to form a big picture.


Without knowledge, understanding is impossible. But having knowledge doesn’t necessarily lead to understanding of a greater narrative, which is the real point of gathering information.

Kim Flintoff's insight:
“Knowing” and “understanding” are related concepts, but they’re not the same. Each is a distinct mental state involving cognitive grasp: Knowing is static, referring to discrete facts, while understanding is active, describing the ability to analyze and place those facts in context to form a big picture.
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What is Agentic Learning and Why is it Important? | Getting Smart

What is Agentic Learning and Why is it Important? | Getting Smart | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

The word agentic is described as an individual’s power to control his or her own goals actions and destiny. It stems from the word agency, which Webster’s Dictionary defines as the capacity, condition, or state of acting or of exerting power. In the late 1980s, Stanford University Psychologist Albert Bandura began developing a theory of social cognition that he associated with self-efficacy. He later examined more specifically the role of agency and motivation, and coined the term Agentic, in which people are viewed as self-organizing, proactive, self-reflecting and self-regulated, which he calls Agentic. Agentic learning is defined by self-directed actions aimed at personal growth and development based on self-chosen goals. Within this context, students initiate actions of their own volition that drive their learning.

Kim Flintoff's insight:
Fostering student agency may seem like a daunting task. Fortunately, there are many pedagogical approaches, such as Project-Based Learning, Inquiry, Design-Based Learning and others that, when implemented well, lead to engagement and intrinsic motivation. Combined with a strong relationship with a teacher, these approaches provide opportunities for students to develop agency.
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Challenge Based Learning Guide by Mark H. Nichols, Karen Cator & Marco Torres on iBooks

Challenge Based Learning Guide by Mark H. Nichols, Karen Cator & Marco Torres on iBooks | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

 This book is available for download with iBooks on your Mac or iOS device. Multi-touch books can be read with iBooks on your Mac or iOS device. Books with interactive features may work best on an iOS device. iBooks on your Mac requires OS X 10.9 or later.
Description
The Challenge Based Learning user guide is for anyone interested in building learning communities focused on identifying Challenges and implementing thoughtful and sustainable solutions. It expands on the original Challenge Based Learning Classroom Guide and White Paper and reflects the most recent information about the framework.
If you are new to Challenge Based Learning the guide provides background information, key concepts, and resources for getting started.  If you are a Challenge Based Learning veteran the guide includes recent updates and expands on the information found in the original white paper and classroom guide. 

Kim Flintoff's insight:
"The Challenge Based Learning user guide is for anyone interested in building learning communities focused on identifying Challenges and implementing thoughtful and sustainable solutions. It expands on the original Challenge Based Learning Classroom Guide and White Paper and reflects the most recent information about the framework.

If you are new to Challenge Based Learning the guide provides background information, key concepts, and resources for getting started. If you are a Challenge Based Learning veteran the guide includes recent updates and expands on the information found in the original white paper and classroom guide."
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The Hanson effect: how hate seeps in and damages us all

The Hanson effect: how hate seeps in and damages us all | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
In a suburban hair salon, a Muslim woman suddenly feels unwelcome in the country she has loved for 40 years.
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What's it like interning at NASA..? - YouTube

Two Curtin Science and Engineering students spent six months working with NASA and share their insights with you!
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Two Curtin Science and Engineering students spent six months working with NASA and share their insights with you!
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The Neuroscience of Narrative and Memory

The Neuroscience of Narrative and Memory | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Weaving learning into a story makes learning more interesting, activates the brain’s positive emotional state, and hooks the information into a strong memory template. The memory then becomes more durable as the learning follows the narrative pattern through sequences connected to a theme, time flow, or actions directed toward solving a problem or reaching a known goal.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
Weaving learning into a story makes learning more interesting, activates the brain’s positive emotional state, and hooks the information into a strong memory template. The memory then becomes more durable as the learning follows the narrative pattern through sequences connected to a theme, time flow, or actions directed toward solving a problem or reaching a known goal.
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Digital skills that teachers need for the classroom #3: The ability to crowdsource information

Digital skills that teachers need for the classroom #3: The ability to crowdsource information | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Nik Peachey is back with the third post from his series on digital teaching skills, this time taking a look at ‘crowdsourcing’ and the online tools you can use to use for this.

As teachers we frequently promote ourselves in our modern role as facilitators rather than knowledge owners and yet when we get into the classroom so much of what we do tends to be telling rather than asking.

Crowdsourcing information is about doing the opposite. It’s about collecting information from the room and beyond and enabling our students to share what they already know and develop their knowledge together.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
Crowdsourcing information is about doing the opposite. It’s about collecting information from the room and beyond and enabling our students to share what they already know and develop their knowledge together.
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Hands-Off Teaching Cultivates Metacognition

Hands-Off Teaching Cultivates Metacognition | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
As a teacher, you put a lot of thought into how to make your class and the material as accessible and engaging as possible. You think about what you know, and how you first learned it. You think about what your students already know, and how to use that knowledge as the foundation for what you're about to teach. And, as if that's not enough, you think about how to make your content so engaging that no matter what else is happening (lunch next period, upcoming prom, or the latest social media scandal among the sophomores), your lesson will hold your students' attention. All that thought goes into a lesson, and still there are students spacing out during class or seeming to fall behind. Working so hard and still not reaching every student can be frustrating. And you have no one to blame but yourself -- you're hogging all the best learning in your classroom.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
Working so hard and still not reaching every student can be frustrating. And you have no one to blame but yourself -- you're hogging all the best learning in your classroom
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TEACHER VOICE: My classroom is the loud one – and the students are thriving - The Hechinger Report

TEACHER VOICE: My classroom is the loud one – and the students are thriving - The Hechinger Report | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
y classroom is the one with lots of noise and activity from students.
We like to get out from behind our desks, move around and have some fun — while learning.
Moving and having fun helps to create a positive classroom culture. And I feel that a positive classroom culture is fundamental to learning.
I’m not alone. Researchers from the Institute of Medicine found “children who are more active show greater attention, have faster cognitive processing speed, and perform better on standardized academic tests than children who are less active.”
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University of Vermont's med school will discontinue lectures

University of Vermont's med school will discontinue lectures | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Dive Brief:

Medical students at the University of Vermont’s Lerner College of Medicine will no longer be taught in a lecture setting, according to William Jeffries, a dean at the school, who says evidence indicates students retain and understand information offered during instruction better in an “active learning” setting. 


Jeffries told NPR neuroscience research indicates that students must not only take in information, but also make sense of it in a way that is easily retained if needed in the future. Chances of students remembering increases if students are required to apply that information to a task, as students in the school will have to do.


Jeffries said there was initially some pushback from professors who were fond of the lecture approach, but he said they were receptive to change once informed that active learning procedures actually are more beneficial to fledging students. 

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Helping Learners Move Beyond “I Can’t Do This”

Helping Learners Move Beyond “I Can’t Do This” | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
I work part-time with elementary learners - with gifted learners during the school year and teaching maker education camps during the summer. The one thing almost all of them have in common is yelling out, "I can't do this" when the tasks aren't completed upon first attempts or get a little too difficult for them.…
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Next Generation Classroom—Some Random Thoughts

Next Generation Classroom—Some Random Thoughts | Active learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The next generation learning experience should lean heavily on collaboration. I see a trend, especially in the sciences, that worries me. Many instructors discourage or even forbid students from collaborating with their classmates, considering it to be cheating. This puts enormous pressure on students. More importantly, this type of learning does not model what they will encounter in the work world, where they will be not discouraged but, rather, expected to collaborate. While I understand the necessity for independent work, there are other ways to achieve the goal of mastery while encouraging collaboration. Some instructors simply alternate assignments, requiring independent work with collaborative projects. Collaborative work can also be paired with lessons about ethics and plagiarism to help shape our students into responsible, ethical adults.

Some of my contemporaries seem pessimistic about today's students, noticing, for example, that students prefer smartphones to books. I don't subscribe to this pessimistic view. The same tension occurs with every generation: I remember this skepticism from older generations when I was young. Today's students grew up with information at their fingertips, so they think differently and learn differently. We should recognize that what they need from a next generation classroom is different too. 
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