Fish and Science News
977 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

Ballot initiative supporters say modern mines still pollute | Outdoors | helenair.com

Ballot initiative supporters say modern mines still pollute | Outdoors | helenair.com | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it
Montana Trout Unlimited and Earthworks sought to bolster their case for the November ballot initiative with a report documenting pollution and costs from mines operating since 1980.

The mining industry pushed back against the claims and said it shouldn't be judged against past pollution.

The groups said in their report that 11 of the 12 mines they examined had water pollution problems not anticipated by regulators when the projects were originally approved. Among the problems cited were accidental releases of polluted water, violations of water standards and off-site contamination.

Cleanup costs at three of the sites have to date exceeded bonds put up by their owners by a combined $70 million, leaving government agencies to pick up the tab.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

New Genetic Research Shows the Legacy of Fish Farm Escapees

New Genetic Research Shows the Legacy of Fish Farm Escapees | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it

Newfoundland’s great fish jailbreak took place on September 18, 2013, when a damaged sea pen, roiled by currents and tides, discharged 20,000 farmed Atlantic salmon into the frigid freedom of Hermitage Bay. Cooke Aquaculture, which owned the failed pen, swiftly set about controlling the damage in the media, if not the ocean. Seals and other predators would scarf up the rogue salmon, the company assured the CBC. The fish, it added, “pose[d] no threat to the environment.” A new genetic analysis, however, refutes that dubious claim. Researchers with Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) have shown that the fish fled Hermitage Bay, fanning out and infiltrating many of southern Newfoundland’s rivers. There, the escapees interbred with their wild cousins—potentially weakening the gene pools of imperiled populations.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

Warming rivers put fly-fishing at risk »

Warming rivers put fly-fishing at risk » | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it
Conditions for this pastime aren't like they used to be.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

Dams powered Tacoma but killed off salmon runs. 92 years later the fish are back | KIRO-TV

Dams powered Tacoma but killed off salmon runs. 92 years later the fish are back | KIRO-TV | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it
Tacoma Power is now in the fish business.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

Idaho fall steelhead forecast looking grim | Fishing | montanauntamed.com

Idaho fall steelhead forecast looking grim | Fishing | montanauntamed.com | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it
Fisheries officials at the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife shut down steelhead fishing on the Columbia River recently. That move was taken after an official downgrade of the steelhead forecast. Prior to the season, state, tribal and federal fisheries managers estimated a combined return of A-run and B-run steelhead to hit 182,000. More recently that estimate was downgraded to about 110,000 and then trimmed again to 96,500. That number includes a projected return of 69,000 adipose fin-clipped hatchery steelhead and 27,500 wild and some unclipped hatchery steelhead.

“It’s close to a 50 percent reduction,” said Alan Byrne, Idaho Fish and Game’s anadromous fish manager at Boise.

If the prediction holds, it would be the lowest steelhead return since 1978 and the first time since then the run has failed to register 100,000 steelhead at Bonneville. For perspective, last year’s meager run was just more than 113,000 there.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

Packrafters confirm Yellowstone cutthroat comeback | helenair.com

Packrafters confirm Yellowstone cutthroat comeback | helenair.com | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it
The cost is justified, the agencies and groups say. Estimates from the early 1990s indicate the economic value of the Yellowstone Lake cutthroat trout fishery likely exceeded $36 million a year.

“Preliminary 2018 lake trout gillnetting results are extremely positive,” reported Dave Sweet, Yellowstone Lake special project manager for Wyoming Trout Unlimited. The total number of mackinaw caught is down 37 percent from last year despite a 7 percent increase in effort. The 2017 catch was down 26 percent from 2016, he added. Efforts also are underway to smother fertilized lake trout eggs on known spawning beds.

Yellowstone Park’s former superintendent Dan Wenk supported lake trout suppression, which must continue for the cutthroat comeback to continue, TU regional spokesman Brett Prettyman said. A new superintendent, Cameron Sholly, is taking charge this summer.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

More than 600 turn out for Snake River protest Saturday | The Spokesman-Review

More than 600 turn out for Snake River protest Saturday | The Spokesman-Review | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it
On Saturday, Chetwood joined roughly 600 others in the annual Free the Snake Flotilla, a protest of the four lower Snake River Dams. Participants brought a variety of craft, including kayaks, motorboats, sailboats and stand-up paddleboards.

They came from Idaho, Washington, Minnesota, California and elsewhere. Anglers, environmentalists and tribal members were represented, among others.

“This is the biggest flotilla yet,” said Sam Mace, the Inland Northwest Director for Save Our Wild Salmon and one of the organizers of the event.

Saturday morning, roughly 20 members of the Nez Perce, Colville, Kalispel, Coeur d’Alene and Spokane tribes launched traditionally made dugout canoes upstream of Lewiston on the Clearwater River.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

Denver ugly fish competition aims to save species in the South Platte - Denverite, the Denver site!

Denver ugly fish competition aims to save species in the South Platte - Denverite, the Denver site! | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it
The local Trout Unlimited chapter has aggressively sought to shape South Platte development in favor of local fish. Davenport said they’ve worked with authorities to create deep pools along the river bottom where trout can hide when the rest of the river has gotten too hot. The money they raise during initiatives like Carpslam has allowed them to purchase instruments and funds studies to assess the river’s health.

Their recent efforts, though, have been all about water availability.

Davenport said Carpslam 2018 raised about $20,000, and virtually everything they’ve raised in the last couple of years have gone towards buying 10 acre feet of water in the new-and-improved Chatfield Reservoir, a $75,000 investment. Parts of the lake in Littleton have been closed this summer as the Army Corps of Engineers prepares to raise the water level and increase storage, and groups like Trout Unlimited have stepped up to purchase some of that space for conservation purposes.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

Salmon group calls for probe into source of foreign fish in bay | CBC News

Salmon group calls for probe into source of foreign fish in bay | CBC News | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it
Crabbe said Atlantic salmon are uniquely adapted to the rivers they live in.

"So when those adaptations are bred out essentially by the hybridization from aquaculture escapes you see populations begin to diminish and collapse," he said in an interview with Information Morning Saint John.

St. John River salmon are the dominant strain used by local aquaculture companies, said Crabbe, and the industry has wanted to additionally use European salmon for some time because they have some superior commercial traits, such as a higher resistance to bacterial kidney disease.

Crabbe said companies also want to expand the farmed-fish gene pool to avoid a so-called genetic bottleneck, where the population dies off because it's vulnerable to some kind of environmental factor.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

No need to travel far for fishery unique to Northwest

No need to travel far for fishery unique to Northwest | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it
Sea-runs can be found in saltwater estuaries in the spring and summer and in freshwater in fall and much of the winter. They’re great sport fish in either location.

“They’re extremely aggressive to the fly,” Dennis said.

He noted that sea-run cutthroat are one of the few local fisheries that aren’t threatened or endangered, partly because anglers must release any they catch in saltwater.

The fact that sea-run coastal cutthroat, also called harvest trout, are a freshwater fish that spend a great deal of their life in saltwater is what makes them unique in the Northwest. They range from coastal rivers in Southern Alaska to Northern California.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

State biologists on the hunt for non-native fish likely planted illegally in Sand Lake

State biologists on the hunt for non-native fish likely planted illegally in Sand Lake | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it

State fish biologists spread gillnets in Anchorage's Sand Lake on Thursday to capture any bass that might be there, after an angler Monday night caught a juvenile bass, a predator that's not native to Alaska and could threaten other fish.

"Wanted! Dead," exclaims a poster on the Alaska Department of Fish and Game's Facebook page, with a picture of a bass and a message to anglers to kill any they catch and call the agency.

"They have the potential to become an invasive species and introduce diseases into water they are released into," said the poster.

The poster does not offer a monetary reward. It does, however, note that transporting and releasing live fish into Alaska waters is illegal.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

Global warming: Worrying lessons from the past

Global warming: Worrying lessons from the past | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it
Fifty-six million years ago, Earth experienced an exceptional episode of global warming. Within 10,000 to 20,000 years, the average temperature increased by 5 to 8 degrees, only returning to its original level a few hundred thousand years later. Based on the analysis of sediments from the southern slope of the Pyrenees, researchers measured the impact of this warming on river floods and the surrounding landscapes. Their conclusions show that the consequences of such global warming may have been much greater than predicted by current climate models.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

Fish Factor: Tiny cod fish reappearing around Kodiak

Fish Factor: Tiny cod fish reappearing around Kodiak | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it
Tiny cod fish are reappearing around Kodiak.

Researchers aim to find out if it is a blip, or a sign that the stock is recovering after warming waters caused the stocks to crash.

Alaska’s seafood industry was shocked last fall when the annual surveys showed cod stocks in the Gulf of Alaska had plummeted by 80 percent to the lowest levels ever seen. Prior surveys indicated large year classes of cod starting in 2012 were expected to produce good fishing for six or more years. But a so called “warm blob” of water depleted food supplies and wiped out that recruitment.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

Mining waste and growing wetlands mean more mercury in fish in Upper Peninsula | Bridge Magazine

Mining waste and growing wetlands mean more mercury in fish in Upper Peninsula | Bridge Magazine | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it
Mercury levels remain high in the lakes, rivers and fish of the western part of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula despite a substantial decline in airborne mercury emissions over the past 30 years, according to scientists from Michigan Technological University and the Environmental Protection Agency.

That’s a “geographic enigma” with health implications, they said in a new study published in the journal “Environmental Science Processes & Impacts.”

The region’s extensive – and growing – wetlands play a major role in the problem. Wetlands are recovering because, as the study observed. “Recently, forested and wetland environments are returning as large northern tracts are converted to state and federal forests and wetland ditching is reduced.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

More Minnow Misconceptions –

More Minnow Misconceptions – | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it
Published just last week, a study by Tan and Armbruster in the journal Zootaxa presented a revised grouping of the Cypriniformes—the most diverse order of freshwater fishes in the world. And what an undertaking it must have been—there are over 4,000 species to sort out!

They concluded that Cyprinidae, in the broad sense, was too big of an umbrella to group all those species together in one family. Instead, what we learned in Ichthyology as Cyprinidae actually represents something broader than a family, and that group contains several families. The ‘new’ Cyprinidae, in a strict sense, has been refined to include much fewer genera.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

Partners for Clean Water focuses on the future of the Boise River - KIVITV.com Boise, ID

Partners for Clean Water focuses on the future of the Boise River - KIVITV.com Boise, ID | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it
Several government agencies and representatives from the cities that surround the Boise River say there is a trend of better water quality in the Boise River.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

New 'hardcore' fish species discovered

Scientists have discovered three new species of "hardcore" fish living in one of the deepest parts of the ocean, the see-through, scale-free creatures perfectly adapted to conditions that would instantly kill most life on Earth
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

Video: How to Keep Your Superglue from Going Bad

Video: How to Keep Your Superglue from Going Bad | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it
Superglue, and all its variants, is extremely useful in fly tying, but the bottles it comes in tend to stick shut over time or the glue itself starts to harden. In this video, Tim shows you an easy solution that will save you time, money, and frustration.
Flathead Valley TU's insight:
Great tip.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

The Colorado River is evaporating, and climate change is a big culprit

The Colorado River is evaporating, and climate change is a big culprit | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it

Over the last century, the river’s flow has declined by around 16 percent, even as annual precipitation slightly increased in the Upper Colorado River Basin — a vast region stretching from Wyoming to New Mexico. 

New research published in the journal Water Resources Research argues that over half of this decline is due to sustained and rising temperatures in the region, which ultimately means more water is evaporated from the river, diminishing the flow.

But it’s really been in the last twenty years that matters have deteriorated into a major drought, edging the region toward a potential water-rationing crisis. 

It's the worst drought in Colorado River history.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

Pipeline Spills More Than 8,000 Gallons of Jet Fuel Into Indiana River

Pipeline Spills More Than 8,000 Gallons of Jet Fuel Into Indiana River | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it
A pipeline spilled more than 8,000 gallons of jet fuel into an Indiana river, The Associated Press reported Sunday.

The affected river was St. Marys River in Decatur, which is a town of 9,500 people about 100 miles from Indianapolis.

Cleaning the spill could take weeks, Decatur Mayor Kenneth L. Meyer told the Fort Wayne, Indiana-based Journal Gazette.

The spill was first reported Friday night in a safety warning issued by the Decatur Police Department urging residents to avoid the area around the spill, local news outlet WANE reported Saturday.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

Researchers scour Yakima for cool pools to save fish | Sunnyside Daily Sun

Researchers scour Yakima for cool pools to save fish | Sunnyside Daily Sun | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it
“Survival of late spring smolts is also influence by rapid water warming, especially in drought years,” Redfield-Wilder said.

Redfield-Wider said that as river flows declined, and air temperatures hovered at 100 degrees, water temperatures near Prosser mirrored those on coastal Hawaii.

“Warm water is becoming all too common in the summer months.” Redfield-Wilder said. “So much so, that we have teams floating the river to document refuges of cooler water.”

Those are places where fish can hang out to avoid the heat. These safe havens may prove crucial to fish survival.

Led by folks with the Benton Conservation District, Yakama Nation, and U.S. Geological Survey, the goal is to profile these cooler as and gain data for the lower 100 miles of the Yakima River. Funded by Ecology, the survey will help us protect these sites and meet environmental enhancement objectives of the Yakima River Basin Integrated Plan.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

The Coeur d'Alene Press , Poor steelhead returns will likely impact small towns that bank on anglers

The Coeur d'Alene Press , Poor steelhead returns will likely impact small towns that bank on anglers | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it
Another poor steelhead run is likely to have economic ripples for businesses that depend on anglers spending money on fishing trips. For Randy Krall, owner of Camp, Cabin and Home in Lewiston, the fickleness of salmon and steelhead runs over the last few years has prompted a change in his business strategy. Krall is slowly eliminating his inventory of fishing tackle and concentrating more on items like high-end barbecues, coolers, home heating stoves and propane accessories.

“You just can’t afford to stock the merchandise when there are no seasons,” he said. “Our business has never been better. Our business is having a record year. But tackle doesn’t even play a part of it anymore.”

He is more worried about the economic fallout in small towns like Orofino, Riggins, Salmon and Kamiah.

“They really depend on tourism from the fish stuff,” Krall said.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

Stibnite: Protesters Tell Midas Water More Precious Than Gold | Boise State Public Radio

Stibnite: Protesters Tell Midas Water More Precious Than Gold | Boise State Public Radio | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it

Alice Anderson of McCall was one of several area residents who attended the rally to voice skepticism about Midas Gold's plan to restore the Stibnite mine while actively mining it.

"I want to be sure open-pit mining doesn't destroy the South Fork of the Salmon River," Anderson said. "I think it really needs to be investigated thoroughly before any decisions are made."

The site has been active, on and off, for more than a century. But a legacy of mining has left the Salmon River largely devoid of its namesake fish. 

Three species of fish in the South Fork watershed are protected under the Endangered Species Act - bull trout, Chinook salmon and steelhead.

Midas Gold says it plans to clean up residual pollution from past mining activity.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

Action Alert: Help Protect the Trout, Salmon, and Steelhead of Oregon's Nehalem River Watershed

Action Alert: Help Protect the Trout, Salmon, and Steelhead of Oregon's Nehalem River Watershed | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it
Oregon’s North Coast is an incomparable wonder, and home to the Nehalem River. (Nehalim is Salish for “place where people live.”) Lush forests, a sweeping coastal estuary, and miles of tributaries make the Nehalem watershed a key habitat for salmon and steelhead.

Currently, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is assessing a 17.5 mile stretch of the Nehalem River for a State Scenic Waterway designation. The proposed section runs from the Spruce Run Campground to the Cougar Valley State Park. The Wild Salmon Center (WSC), private landowners, community members, public land owners, and conservation organizations all partner to form the advisory committee to provide input on the designation’s management plan.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Flathead Valley TU
Scoop.it!

Trout species thought to be extinct found alive in Southwest Colorado

Trout species thought to be extinct found alive in Southwest Colorado | Fish and Science News | Scoop.it

Colorado Parks and Wildlife announced the discovery of a “unique genetic lineage” of the Colorado River cutthroat trout Tuesday, saying that genetic testing of the fish’s DNA was confirmed earlier this year.

Return of the native Colorado River cutthroat trout
The fish were found in eight small populations, CPW said, in streams of the San Juan River basin within the San Juan National Forest and on private property, surviving in isolated habitats and naturally reproducing.

To protect the fish, CPW is not releasing where in the San Juan River basin the cutthroat were found.

more...
No comment yet.