First "test tube baby" born
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'Bio-panic' sees twice as many single women try for IVF babies - Telegraph

'Bio-panic' sees twice as many single women try for IVF babies - Telegraph | First "test tube baby" born | Scoop.it

Record numbers of single women are embarking on motherhood without a lover, fearing they might end up childless if they wait for the "perfect" man.

IVF treatment given to women determined to go it alone has more than doubled in the past five years, according to the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA).

Fertility clinics have coined the phrase "bio-panic" to describe the trend for women in their late 30s and older to give up on finding a father and rely instead on family and friends for support.

Dr Gillian Lockwood, chairman of the British Fertility Society ethics committee, said: "Women are clearly -listening to the warnings about how natural fertility declines in their late 30s and are deciding they don't want to leave it until it is too late.

"Many are suddenly realising that this commitment-phobic man they are living with, who says he wants children 'at some point', cannot hear their biological clocks ticking. These are wonderful, educated, professional women who are making a definite choice about motherhood."

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Key Terms

Key Terms

 

fertilization: union of sperm and egg

 

fallopian tubes: tubes through which eggs pass to the uterus

 

endometriosis: disorder of the endometrium, the lining of the uterus

 

hormone: molecule released by one cell to influence another

 

gamete: reproductive cell, such as sperm or egg

 

laparoscopic surgery: surgery in which an instrument is inserted through a very small incision, usually guided by some type of imaging technique

 

zygote: fertilized egg

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Fertility Technology Helps Couple Have Baby Decades After Cancer Treatment

Fertility Technology Helps Couple Have Baby Decades After Cancer Treatment | First "test tube baby" born | Scoop.it

Before receiving radiation treatment for cancer as a teenager, Chris Biblis made a sperm donation that allowed him and his wife to have a baby 22 years later.

 

AN IFV SUCCESS STORY

Biblis was diagnosed with leukemia in the early 1980s. He was 13 at the time, and received chemotherapy for three years, according to The Charlotte Observer.

 

When he was 16, doctors suggested two more years of treatment, including radiation that could make him sterile.

 

Biblis’ parents worried that he might not be able to have children, and convinced doctors to save a sperm sample from Chris. The idea was considered “unusual” at the time.

 

Biblis, now in his late 30s, and his wife Melodie, recently celebrated the birth of their first child, who was conceived through in vitro fertilization (IVF) using his sperm sample collected years ago.

 

Doctors believe Biblis and his wife may have set, or tied, a world record “for having used the longest-frozen sperm to produce a baby,” The Charlotte Observer wrote.

 

FOX News reported that a sperm cell was first injected into a human egg in a lab by scientists in 1992.

 

According to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, nearly 500,000 babies have been born in the United States through 2006 using IVF and other assisted reproductive technology methods.

 

 

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World's First Test Tube Baby Born 7/25/1978

On this day in 1978, Louise Joy Brown, the world's first baby to be conceived via in vitro fertilization (IVF) is born at Oldham and District General Hospital in Manchester, England, to parents Lesley and Peter Brown. The healthy baby was delivered shortly before midnight by caesarean section and weighed in at five pounds, 12 ounces.

Before giving birth to Louise, Lesley Brown had suffered years of infertility due to blocked fallopian tubes. In November 1977, she underwent the then-experimental IVF procedure. A mature egg was removed from one of her ovaries and combined in a laboratory dish with her husband’s sperm to form an embryo. The embryo then was implanted into her uterus a few days later. Her IVF doctors, British gynecologist Patrick Steptoe and scientist Robert Edwards, had begun their pioneering collaboration a decade earlier. Once the media learned of the pregnancy, the Browns faced intense public scrutiny. Louise’s birth made headlines around the world and raised various legal and ethical questions.

The Browns had a second daughter, Natalie, several years later, also through IVF. In May 1999, Natalie became the first IVF baby to give birth to a child of her own. The child’s conception was natural, easing some concerns that female IVF babies would be unable to get pregnant naturally. In December 2006, Louise Brown, the original "test tube baby," gave birth to a boy, Cameron John Mullinder, who also was conceived naturally.

Today, IVF is considered a mainstream medical treatment for infertility. Hundreds of thousands of children around the world have been conceived through the procedure, in some cases with donor eggs and sperm.

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In Vitro Fertilization

In vitro fertilization (IVF) is a method of infertility treatment in which an egg and sperm are joined in a laboratory container ("in vitro" means "in glass"). This is in contrast to normal "in vivo" conception, in which fertilization occurs in the fallopian tube of a woman's reproductive tract. Scientist S. L. Schenk began animal IVF research in 1880, but it was not until 1959 that the first animal IVF was clearly documented by another scientist, Michael Chang. In 1978 Patrick Steptoe and Robert Edwards in England produced the first human IVF baby, Louise Brown, who became known as the world's first test-tube baby. The first IVF baby in the United States was born in 1981, largely due to the research work of Howard and Georgeanna Jones. The Joneses varied their technique from that of Steptoe and Edwards, and these newer techniques grew into contemporary IVF. In the United States alone, over thirty-five thousand babies were born through assisted reproductive technologies (ART) techniques in 1999. ART use has increased 54 percent between 1996 and 2000, the only years for which data is available. It is unclear if increase in use is due to actual increases in infertility over this time period, increases in knowledge and availability of services, or due to the aging of the large baby-boom cohort, many of whom delayed childbearing and reached their later and less fertile reproductive years during this time. Even so, ART is used by only 1 percent of all reproductive aged women, and by only 7 percent of all women who seek services for infertility.

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IVF News - Lesbians plan IVF to create a 'shared' baby

IVF News - Lesbians plan IVF to create a 'shared' baby | First "test tube baby" born | Scoop.it

A lesbian couple are planning to use IVF to create a 'shared baby', the UK press has reported. Hayley Marlow and Vicky Hill want to have one of Ms Hill's eggs fertilised, using donor sperm, but to then implant any resulting embryo into Ms Marlow's womb. Ms Marlow would then be the birth mother, while Ms Hill would be the genetic mother of any child born.

 

The couple, who live in Oxfordshire, say they have consulted their GP about having a baby this way, but have not yet been referred to a specialist. Ms Marlow said they had got the idea because 'a lot of lesbians have children using male friends as sperm donors', but said they wanted to go one step further. 'We want a baby that has truly come from both of us and the only way to do that is by me carrying Vicky's baby', she said.

 

The two women are hoping to have the IVF procedure paid for by the National Health Service (NHS), but appreciate it will still cost them a lot of money. However, they want to do it because it will 'complete their family' - Ms Marlow already has a five-year old daughter from a previous heterosexual relationship. They say that any child they have will call Ms Hill 'mummy' and call Ms Marlow by her first name, Hayley. The couple will need the approval of their local NHS trust in order to proceed with the treatment, and the Department of Health has warned that its guidelines might not cover NHS IVF treatment in this way.

 

Pink Parents, a charity that supports gay couples raising families, said that it expected that most fertility clinics would be reluctant to perform the IVF procedure in this way, because the success rate is lower when transferring eggs from one woman to another. A spokesperson for Pink Parents said 'although rare, we are now receiving more requests for information on this type of pregnancy'.

 

A spokesman for the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA), which regulates the provision of fertility treatment in the UK, said that there was no legal block on same-sex couples having fertility treatment. But, he continued, 'the couple would need to have a welfare of the child check to make sure they can provide a stable environment for the child'. He added 'If there were no father figure the clinician has to assess the kind of people who are going to be in the child's life who may be able to take that role'. A Department of Health spokesman said that it is 'extremely unlikely' that the couple will get their IVF on the NHS - explaining that couples must have tried for three years unsuccessfully to have a baby and have a 'defined cause of infertility' to be approved.

 

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In Vitro Fertilization

In Vitro Fertilization

The first so-called test tube baby, Louise Brown, was born in England in 1978. Since then, hundreds of thousands of babies have been conceived using in vitro fertilization (IVF) and related techniques. IVF is often used for women with blocked or malfunctioning fallopian tubes, severe endometriosis, or unexplained infertility. Prior to IVF, a woman is given synthetic hormones that stimulate the maturation and release of a large number of eggs. The eggs are removed from the ovaries using an ultrasound-guided needle and combined with sperm in a laboratory dish. To increase the chances of pregnancy, four to six embryos are typically implanted into the uterus when they are about three days old. Extra embryos may be frozen for later use.

Since multiple embryos are implanted, there is an increased chance of multiple births and the associated risks to both mother and children. Selective reduction (abortion) of one or more fetuses may be used to reduce the number of multiples. IVF is expensive; as of June 2009, the procedure in the United States ranges from $12,000 to $15,000. The likelihood of producing a child using IVF decreases with increased maternal age. For example, when five to seven eggs are used, the chances of a successful life birth are approximately 45 percent, 35 percent, and 18 percent in women aged under thirty-five, thirty-five to thirty-nine, and forty to forty-two years.

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Test Tube Babies On the Rise Worldwide | LiveScience

Test Tube Babies On the Rise Worldwide | LiveScience | First "test tube baby" born | Scoop.it

.More than 200,000 babies were born worldwide with the help of in vitro fertilization and other reproductive technologies in 2002, with a 25 percent increase between 2000 and 2002, according to a new report.

However, the "Octomom" aside, multiple births resulting from assisted reproductive technologies (ART) have been on the decline, with Europe and Australia-New Zealand leading the way in the reduction of multiples, say the scientists responsible for the report published online today in the journal Human Reproduction.

(Multiple births, rather than being seen as a success, are considered a serious medical complication with potentially harmful effects for both babies and mom.)

The report included 2002 data from 1,563 clinics in 53 countries with data missing from some countries, mostly in Asia, Africa, Oceania and the West Indies. The authors estimated the "missing" countries likely performed 10 percent to 20 percent of ART procedures, and the researchers took this into account when calculating worldwide numbers.

Here are more report highlights:

The transfer of multiple embryos has decreased, leading to a slight decline in multiple births.Overall, the percentage of four or more embryo transfers decreased from 15.4 percent in 2000 to 13.7 percent in 2002, the most recent year for which world figures are available.The proportion of twin and triplet pregnancies decreased from 26.5 percent to 25.7 percent, and from 2.9 percent to 2.5 percent, respectively.Europe and Australia-New Zealand reported triplet rates (associated with ART) that were about half those of the United States and five-fold less than Latin America.The United States showed the highest pregnancy rates resulting from ART.Between 2000 and 2002, the use of intracytoplasmic sperm injection, or ICSI (an individual sperm cell is introduced into each egg obtained through the in vitro fertilization process), increased from 54 percent to 61 percent in North America, and 46 percent to 54 percent in Europe. In Latin America, ICSI reached 76 percent in 2002 and 92 percent for the Middle East.

Jacques de Mouzon is a specialist in public health who led the International Committee for Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technology (ICMART), which compiled the report. He said the report is important because, "even if it is imperfect, it gives data that can inform debate and decision-making on issues such as availability and the benefits and risks of this important medical practice."

He added, "It allows us to make comparisons between countries and regions, and to analyze trends by comparing with previous reports."

However, the authors warn that variation in data quality, in addition to differences in practices, legislation, guidelines, culture and religion, mean that comparisons between countries "must be done with caution."

ICMART receives financial support from the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Bertarelli Foundation, European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology, Fertility Society of Australia, Latin American Network for Reproductive Medicine, Middle East Fertility Society and Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology.

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General Logon Page

IVF was originally developed to treat infertility due to blocked or absent fallopian tubes in women under thirty-five years of age. The use of IVF has expanded considerably over the years, and it is now considered to be a treatment for ovulation dysfunction in women, male infertility, and infertility of unknown etiology. Some IVF facilities offer egg donation programs so women without ovaries or women whose advanced age or menopausal status makes successful conception impossible can achieve pregnancy. Embryos can be frozen and stored indefinitely for later use, for donation to other couples, or for transfer to the uterus of a surrogate mother. Embryos can also be screened for genetic disorders prior to transferring them to a woman's uterus.

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