Food for Fertility
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Food for Fertility
A collection of studies that provides the bedrock for Fertility Meals (a subscription service that delivers weekly fertility-friendly meal plans and shopping lists to your inbox). Also includes select fertility-friendly meal plans from across the web.
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Effects of caloric intake timing on insulin ... [Clin Sci (Lond). 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

Abstract

In women with PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome), hyperinsulinaemia stimulates ovarian cytochrome P450c17α activity that, in turn, stimulates ovarian androgen production. Our objective was to compare whether timed caloric intake differentially influences insulin resistance and hyperandrogenism in lean PCOS women. A total of 60 lean PCOS women [BMI (body mass index), 23.7±0.2 kg/m⊃2;] were randomized into two isocaloric (~1800 kcal; where 1 kcal≈4.184 J) maintenance diets with different meal timing distribution: a BF (breakfast diet) (980 kcal breakfast, 640 kcal lunch and 190 kcal dinner) or a D (dinner diet) group (190 kcal breakfast, 640 kcal lunch and 980 kcal dinner) for 90 days. In the BF group, a significant decrease was observed in both AUC(glucose) (glucose area under the curve) and AUC(insulin) (insulin area under the curve) by 7 and 54% respectively. In the BF group, free testosterone decreased by 50% and SHBG (sex hormone-binding globulin) increased by 105%. GnRH (gonadotropin-releasing hormone)-stimulated peak serum 17OHP (17α-hydroxyprogesterone) decreased by 39%. No change in these parameters was observed in the D group. In addition, women in the BF group had an increased ovulation rate. In lean PCOS women, a high caloric intake at breakfast with reduced intake at dinner results in improved insulin sensitivity indices and reduced cytochrome P450c17α activity, which ameliorates hyperandrogenism and improves ovulation rate. Meal timing and distribution should be considered as a therapeutic option for women with PCOS.

PMID:23688334
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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An Isocaloric Low Glycemic Index Diet Impro... [J Acad Nutr Diet. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

Abstract

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder affecting 5% to 10% of women worldwide. Approximately half of women withPCOS are lean, yet may still present with central obesity and metabolic disturbances. Low-glycemic index (GI) dietary intervention studies have demonstrated improvements in insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant populations; however, there is little evidence of this effect in women with PCOS. This research aimed to determine the efficacy of an isocaloric low-GI dietary intervention on insulin sensitivity, independent of weight change, in women with PCOS. A nonrandomized 12-week low-GI dietary intervention, preceded by a 12-week habitual diet control phase and proceeded by a 12-week follow-up phase was conducted. Dietary intake, body composition, and metabolic risk markers were determined at baseline, after completion of the habitual diet control phase, and after the low-GI dietary intervention. Twenty-six participants were recruited at baseline, 22 commenced and 21 participants completed the low-GI dietary intervention phase. The primary outcome was change in insulin sensitivity. Secondary outcomes included assessment of changes to lipids, body composition, and estimated macronutrient intake. Repeated measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni correction were used to detect changes to outcomes across study timepoints. Twenty-one women with PCOS with mean (± standard deviation) age of 32.1±6.7 years completed the 12-week low-GI dietary intervention. As expected, no significant changes occurred during the 12-week habitual dietcontrol phase. However, during the dietary intervention phase, dietary GI decreased from 54.5± 3.5 to 48.6±5.1 (P<0.001) with a concurrent small reduction in saturated fat intake (12.4%±3% to 11.7%±3% contribution from energy, P=0.03), despite no specific recommendations to modify fat intake. Measures of insulin sensitivity and nonesterified fatty acid improved after intervention (P=0.03 and P=0.01, respectively). This is the first study to implement an isocaloric low-GI diet in women with PCOS and findings may contribute to the limited research in thi

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Serum antimüllerian hormone in response to die... [Fertil Steril. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

AbstractOBJECTIVE:

To investigate whether randomized diet and/or physical exercise influence serum levels of antimüllerian hormone (AMH) in obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

DESIGN:

Randomized, 4-month trial with three interventions.

SETTING:

Women's health clinical research unit at a university hospital.

PATIENT(S):

Fifty-seven overweight/obese women with PCOS.

INTERVENTION(S):

Diet, physical exercise, or both, using programs individually adapted and supervised by a dietician and/or a physiotherapist.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Serum AMH levels before and after the interventions and correlations to reproductive function, body composition, and endocrine and metabolic variables.

RESULT(S):

After intervention, serum levels of AMH were significantly decreased only in the diet group, and the levels were significantly lower than in the exercise group. The strongest predictor of decreased AMH was a decrease in free T, whereas weight loss had no significant influence. Normalized levels of AMH were associated with improvements in menstrual cyclicity and hyperandrogenism but not in metabolic variables.

CONCLUSION(S):

This randomized study supports that diet reduces serum AMH in association with decreased androgen levels in obese women with PCOS. Increased serum AMH may be used as a marker of ovulatory dysfunction and hyperandrogenism but not as a marker of insulin resistance.

CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRY NUMBER:

ISRCTN48342048.

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Improvement in endocrine and ovarian function during dietary treatment of obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome - Kiddy - 2008 - Clinical Endocrinology - Wiley Online Library

Improvement in endocrine and ovarian function during dietary treatment of obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome - Kiddy - 2008 - Clinical Endocrinology - Wiley Online Library | Food for Fertility | Scoop.it
Summary

objective Obese women with poiycystic ovary syndrome have a greater frequency of menstrual disturbance and of hirsutism than lean women with the syndrome. initial studies have demonstrated a marked improvement in endocrine function following a short-term, very low calorie diet. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of long-term calorie restriction on clinical as well as biochemical abnormalities in obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

design We performed a wlthin-groupcomparison of ciinical and biochemical indices before and during dietary treatment.

patients Twenty-four obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome (mean weight 91·5 (SD 14·7) kg) were scheduled for treatment for 6–7 months with a 1000 kcal, low fat diet. Nineteen of the 24 had menstrual disturbances, 12 had infertility and 19 were hirsute.

measurements and results Thirteen subjects lost more than 5% of their starting weight (range 5·9–22%). in this group there was no significant change in gonadotrophin or total serum testosterone levels but there was a marked increase in concentrations of sex hormonebinding globulin (pretreatment: 23·6 (9·5); post-treatment 36·3 (11·8) nmol/l, P= 0·002) and a reciprocal change in free testosterone levels (77 (26) vs 53 (21) pmol/l, P= 0·009). These changes were accompanied by a reduction in fasting serum insulin levels (median (range) 11·2 (5·2–32) vs 2·3 (0·1–13·8) mU/l, P= 0·018) and the insulin response to 75 g oral glucose. There were no significant changes in these indices in the group who lost < 5% of their inltiai body weight.

Of the 13 women who lost > 5% of their pretreatment weight, 11 had menstrual dysfunction. Amongst these women, nine of 11 showed an improvement in reproductive function, i.e. they either conceived (five) or experienced a more regular menstrual pattern. There was a reduction in hlrsutism in 40% of the women in this group. By contrast, in the group who lost less than 5% of their initial weight, only one of the eight with menstrual disturbances noted an improvement in reproductive function and none had a signtficant reduction in hirsutism.

conclusions These data indicate that moderate weight loss during long-term calorie restriction is associated with a marked clinical improvement which reflects the reduction in insulin concentrations and reciprocal changes in SHBG. The improvement in menstrual function and fertility may therefore be consequent upon an increase in insulin sensitivity which, directly or indirectly, affects ovarian function.

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Preconception lifestyle advice for people with subfertility - The Cochrane Library - Anderson - Wiley Online Library

Authords' conclusions: 

No RCTs were located that assessed the effects of preconception advice on the chance of a live birth or other fertility outcomes in people who perceived that they may be infertile and were investigating the possibility of medical treatment to address subfertility. Given the lack of RCTs evaluating the effectiveness of preconception lifestyle advice for people in the afore-mentioned population, this review cannot provide guidance for clinical practice in this area. However, it does highlight the need for further research into this important subject.

 
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The preconception diet is associated with the chance of ongoing pregnancy in women undergoing IVF/ICSI treatment

The preconception diet is associated with the chance of ongoing pregnancy in women undergoing IVF/ICSI treatment | Food for Fertility | Scoop.it
Abstract

BACKGROUND Subfertility and poor nutrition are increasing problems in Western countries. Moreover, nutrition affects fertility in both women and men. In this study, we investigate the association between adherence to general dietary recommendations in couples undergoing IVF/ICSI treatment and the chance of ongoing pregnancy.

METHODS Between October 2007 and October 2010, couples planning pregnancy visiting the outpatient clinic of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of the Erasmus Medical Centre in Rotterdam, the Netherlands were offered preconception counselling. Self-administered questionnaires on general characteristics and diet were completed and checked during the visit. Six questions, based on dietary recommendations of the Netherlands Nutrition Centre, covered the intake of six main food groups (fruits, vegetables, meat, fish, whole wheat products and fats). Using the questionnaire results, we calculated the Preconception Dietary Risk score (PDR), providing an estimate of nutritional habits. Dietary quality increases with an increasing PDR score. We define ongoing pregnancy as an intrauterine pregnancy with positive heart action confirmed by ultrasound. For this analysis we selected all couples (n= 199) who underwent a first IVF/ICSI treatment within 6 months after preconception counselling. We applied adjusted logistic regression analysis on the outcomes of interest using SPSS.

RESULTS After adjustment for age of the woman, smoking of the woman, PDR of the partner, BMI of the couple and treatment indication we show an association between the PDR of the woman and the chance of ongoing pregnancy after IVF/ICSI treatment (odds ratio 1.65, confidence interval: 1.08–2.52; P= 0.02]. Thus, a one-point increase in the PDR score associates with a 65% increased chance of ongoing pregnancy.

CONCLUSIONS Our results show that increasing adherence to Dutch dietary recommendations in women undergoing IVF/ICSI treatment increases the chance of ongoing pregnancy. These data warrant further confirmation in couples achieving a spontaneous pregnancy and in randomized controlled trials.

Camille Freeman's insight:

"The current guidelines are at least four slices of whole wheat bread daily (or comparable servings of cereals), the use of monounsaturated or polyunsaturated oils, ≥200 g of vegetables daily, ≥2 pieces of fruit daily, ≥3 servings of meat or meat replacers weekly and ≥1 servings of fish weekly. Based on these questions we calculated the Preconception Dietary Risk score (PDR). When the intake of each food group met the recommendations of the Netherlands Nutrition Centre, a score of one point was assigned. Thus, the maximum PDR score was six and represented highly adequate nutrition according to recommendations of the Netherlands Nutrition Centre."


"the logistic regression analysis shows an association between the PDR of the woman and the probability of ongoing pregnancy after IVF/ICSI treatment [OR 1.65, confidence interval (CI): 1.08–2.52; P= 0.02] (Table II). Thus, a beneficial increase in the PDR with one point associates with an increase of 65% in the chance of ongoing pregnancy after the first IVF/ICSI treatment within 6 months after counselling. The OR is adjusted for the confounders: treatment indication, age of the woman (squared), BMI and smoking status of the woman and the PDR and BMI of the partner. Interestingly, an increasing PDR of the men seemed to reduce the chance of pregnancy after IVF/ICSI treatment. "

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High dietary intake of saturated fat is assoc... [Am J Clin Nutr. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

AbstractBACKGROUND:

Saturated fat intake has been associated with both cardiovascular disease and cancer risk, and a newly published study found an association between saturated fat intake and a lower sperm concentration in infertile men.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective was to examine the association between dietary fat intake and semen quality among 701 young Danish men from the general population.

DESIGN:

In this cross-sectional study, men were recruited when they were examined to determine their fitness for military service from 2008 to 2010. They delivered a semen sample, underwent a physical examination, and answered a questionnaire comprising a quantitative food-frequency questionnaire to assess food and nutrient intakes. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed with semen variables as outcomes and dietary fat intakes as exposure variables, adjusted for confounders.

RESULTS:

A lower sperm concentration and total sperm count in men with a high intake of saturated fat was found. A significant dose-response association was found, and men in the highest quartile of saturated fat intake had a 38% (95% CI: 0.1%, 61%) lower sperm concentration and a 41% (95% CI: 4%, 64%) lower total sperm count than did men in the lowest quartile. No association between semen quality and intake of other types of fat was found.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings are of potentially great public interest, because changes in diet over the past decades may be part of the explanation for the recently reported high frequency of subnormal human sperm counts. A reduction in saturated fat intake may be beneficial for both general and reproductive health.

PMID:23269819[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
 
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A randomized, 48-week, placebo-controlled tria... [Fertil Steril. 2004] - PubMed - NCBI

Abstract
OBJECTIVE:

To obtain data from a pilot randomized trial on the effect of metformin therapy and lifestyle modification on ovulation and androgen concentrations in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

DESIGN:

Prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled pilot trial.

SETTING:

Academic medical center.

PATIENT(S):

Thirty-eight overweight or obese women with PCOS.

INTERVENTION(S):

All subjects were randomized to one of four 48-week interventions: metformin 850 mg two times per day, lifestyle modification plus metformin 850 mg two times per day, lifestyle modification plus placebo, or placebo alone.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Recruitment, dropout, and compliance with a long-term lifestyle intervention in PCOS; preliminary estimates of treatment effect on ovulation, as measured by weekly urinary pregnanediol glucuronide, and on total T and free androgen index.

RESULT(S):

It was necessary to screen seven women to have one subject randomized. The dropout rate was 39%, with the majority of dropouts occurring within the first 24 weeks. Mean body mass index was >39 mg/kg(2). Modest weight reduction was found in all treatment groups, with the most significant reduction occurring with the combination of metformin and lifestyle intervention. Significant androgen reduction occurred in the combination group only. Ovulation rates did not differ significantly between groups. However, when data were analyzed by presence or absence of weight reduction in subjects, independent of treatment group, the estimated odds ratio for weight loss was 9.0 (95% confidence interval 1.2-64.7) with respect to regular ovulation. If weight loss occurred during metformin therapy, the odds ratio for regular ovulation was 16.2 (95% confidence interval 4.4-60.2).

CONCLUSION(S):

Key methodologic issues for a large-scale, randomized trial of lifestyle intervention in PCOS include minimizing early dropout from the lifestyle intervention and including a range of body mass index that is not skewed toward severe obesity. Weight reduction might play the most significant role in restoration of ovulation in obese women with PCOS.

PMID:15302293
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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Supplementation of clomiphene citrate c... [Reprod Biomed Online. 2009] - PubMed - NCBI

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
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» Fertility After 40 Enhanced By Diet | A Child After 40

» Fertility After 40 Enhanced By Diet | A Child After 40 | Food for Fertility | Scoop.it
Cindy Bailey conceived her son after age 40, only 4 months after going on a specialized fertility diet for older women.

Via AChildAfter40.com
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A Preconception Diet

A Preconception Diet | Food for Fertility | Scoop.it
Camille Freeman's insight:

1 week meal plan, selected recipes - a bit more dairy & "cool/cold" foods than I might prefer

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Non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Is... [J Gastrointestin Liver Dis. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
Camille Freeman's insight:
Abstract

Celiac disease is an immune-mediated inflammatory disorder of the small intestine caused by sensitivity to dietary gluten and related proteins in genetically predisposed individuals. Over the past several years, the concept of non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) has gained significant interest from the scientific community and mass media and the number of individuals embracing a gluten-free diet is rapidly growing. This condition is characterized by gastrointestinal or extraintestinal symptoms that respond to gluten withdrawal without evidence for underlying celiac disease or wheat allergy. Symptoms display significant overlap with the irritable bowel syndrome. Many important factors regarding this relatively novel condition remain to be elucidated; no discriminative markers to support a diagnosis of gluten sensitivity have been identified yet and its pathogenesis remains obscure. Here we review the current knowledge on NCGS, and outline potential pathogenic pathways of different gluten related disorders in order to gain clues about the pathophysiology of this novel condition.

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Effect of a low glycemic index compared with ... [Am J Clin Nutr. 2010] - PubMed - NCBI

AbstractBACKGROUND:

Women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) are intrinsically insulin resistant and have a high risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Weight loss improves risk factors, but the optimal diet composition is unknown. Low-glycemic index (low-GI) diets are recommended without evidence of their clinical effectiveness.

OBJECTIVE:

We compared changes in insulin sensitivity and clinical outcomes after similar weight losses after consumption of a low-GI dietcompared with a conventional healthy diet in women with PCOS.

DESIGN:

We assigned overweight and obese premenopausal women with PCOS (n = 96) to consume either an ad libitum low-GI diet or a macronutrient-matched healthy diet and followed the women for 12 mo or until they achieved a 7% weight loss. We compared changes in whole-body insulin sensitivity, which we assessed using the insulin sensitivity index derived from the oral-glucose-tolerance test (ISI(OGTT)); glucose tolerance; body composition; plasma lipids; reproductive hormones; health-related quality of life; and menstrual cycle regularity.

RESULTS:

The attrition rate was high in both groups (49%). Among completers, ISI(OGTT) improved more with the low-GI diet than with the conventional healthy diet (mean +/- SEM: 2.2 +/- 0.7 compared with 0.7 +/- 0.6, respectively; P = 0.03). There was a significant diet-metformin interaction (P = 0.048), with greater improvement in ISI(OGTT) among women prescribed both metformin and the low-GI diet. Compared with women who consumed the conventional healthy diet, more women who consumed the low-GI diet showed improved menstrual cyclicity (95% compared with 63%, respectively; P = 0.03). Among the biochemical measures, only serum fibrinogen concentrations showed significant differences between diets (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

To the best of our knowledge, this study provides the first objective evidence to justify the use of low-GI diets in the management ofPCOS.

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Randomized comparison of the influence of diet... [Fertil Steril. 2011] - PubMed - NCBI

AbstractOBJECTIVE:

To compare the influence of dietary management and/or physical exercise on ovarian function and metabolic variables in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

DESIGN:

Randomized 4-month trial with three interventions and a long-term follow-up.

SETTING:

Women's health clinical research unit at a university hospital.

PATIENT(S):

Fifty-seven overweight/obese women with PCOS.

INTERVENTION(S):

Dietary management, physical exercise, or both, using programs individually adapted and supervised by a dietician and/or a physical therapist.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Ovarian function, endocrinologic, and metabolic status and body composition.

RESULT(S):

On average, body mass index was reduced 6% by the dietary management, 3% by the exercise, and 5% by the combined interventions. Lower body fat and lean body mass were significantly decreased in the dietary groups, whereas upper body fat was lowered and lean body mass maintained by exercise alone. The menstrual pattern was significantly improved in 69% and ovulation confirmed in 34% of the patients, with no differences among the groups. The strongest predictor of resumed ovulation was a high serum level of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 after the intervention. Follow-up of one-half of the patients for a median of 2.8 years revealed sustained weight reduction and improvement in menstrual pattern.

CONCLUSION(S):

Dietary management and exercise, alone or in combination, are equally effective in improving reproductive function in overweight/obese women with PCOS. The underlying mechanisms appear to involve enhanced insulin sensitivity. Supportive individualized programs for lifestyle change could exert long-term beneficial effects.

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Sourdough bread: Starch digestibility and postprandial glycemic response

Sourdough bread: Starch digestibility and postprandial glycemic response | Food for Fertility | Scoop.it
Abstract

To evaluate the influence of sourdough fermentation on starch digestibility in bread, four experimental breads were obtained, prepared from two different wheat flours (whole or white) by two different leavening techniques (sourdough and with Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Products were analyzed for their starch, fiber and resistant starch (RS) content and then submitted to in vitro hydrolysis with porcine alpha-amylase. On the same breads, postprandial blood glucose was evaluated in healthy human subjects. Both sourdough fermented breads gave glycaemic responses significantly lower (p < 0.001) than the corresponding products leavened with S. cerevisiae. On the contrary, the presence of fiber did not influence the glycaemic potential of breads. RS levels were higher in the sourdough products, whereas no differences were observed either in the rate of starch hydrolysis or in the degree of polymerization of the starch residues after the in vitro hydrolysis. We may conclude that sourdough fermentation is a technique able to reduce the glycaemic response to bread and that the mechanism does not seem related to the rate of starch hydrolysis.

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Role of micronutrients in the periconceptional period

Role of micronutrients in the periconceptional period | Food for Fertility | Scoop.it
Abstract

BACKGROUND Micronutrient deficiencies have been associated with significantly high reproductive risks, ranging from infertility to fetal structural defects and long-term diseases. In this review we focus on the reproductive risks related to some micronutrients during the periconceptional period, a critical step in determining fetal development and health due to the potential onset of several disorders.

METHODS Embase Medline and PubMed databases, Google-indexed scientific literature and periodics from on-line University of Milan Bibliotecary Service were searched to identify relevant publications. In vivohuman studies were mainly searched for, but when needed animal studies as well as in vitro and cell culture experiments were also considered.

RESULTS Fertility, conception, implantation, fetal organogenesis and placentation are the critical stages potentially affected by nutrition during the periconceptional period. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and total homocysteine (tHcy) plasma levels are factors involved in the respective mechanisms. The preconceptional period is particularly important since it affects both fertility and the early stages of gestation. Micronutrients' dietary intake and maternal status affect the different phases of the onset and development of pregnancy as well as of the conceptus.

CONCLUSION Although human studies are scarce, and conclusive evidence is provided solely for periconceptional folate and prevention of neural tube defects (NTDs), the overall data indicate that micronutrients may affects fertility, embryogenesis and placentation, and the prophylactic use of some micronutrients may be useful in preventing several adverse pregnancy outcomes. Efforts to increase awareness of a healthy diet should be strengthened not only throughout pregnancy but also before. However, further researches in humans are necessary to optimise periconceptional micronutrient requirements.

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Preconception nutritional intake and lifestyle factors: first results of an explorative study

Abstract 

Objective: To describe nutritional intake and lifestyle factors in women planning pregnancy. Study design: A semi-quantitative, 1-month food frequency questionnaire and a questionnaire on health practices and personal views were filled out at home and verified by telephone interview. Results: One hundred and one women agreed to participate and data of 69 women were eligible for evaluation. Women planning pregnancy (n=46) consumed significantly more saturated fats and proteins, less carbohydrates and higher median intakes of Vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, calcium, selenium, magnesium and iron than controls (n=23; P<0.05). However, the percentage of women planning pregnancy with intakes below recommended dietary allowances was 74% for iron, 59% for selenium, 48% for Vitamin A and 91% for copper. Ninety-six percent and 20% of them reported alcohol use and smoking, respectively. Conclusions: Nutritional intake of women in the preconception period appears to be inadequate. Efforts to increase awareness of a healthy diet and lifestyle before and throughout pregnancy should be continued

.

European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Volume 111, Issue 2, Pages 167-172, 10 December 2003, Authors:Sabina de Weerd; Eric A.P Steegers; Mirjam M Heinen; Sharon van den Eertwegh; Rianne M.E.J Vehof; Régine P.M Steegers-Theunissen...

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The FAST study: Fertility ASsessment and advice Targeting lifestyle choices and behaviours: a pilot study

The FAST study: Fertility ASsessment and advice Targeting lifestyle choices and behaviours: a pilot study | Food for Fertility | Scoop.it
Abstract

BACKGROUND Lifestyle has been shown to affect fertility in both males and females, with compelling evidence that smoking and being under or overweight impairs natural and assisted fertility, and other factors such as stress and caffeine have also been implicated. The objective of this study was to determine whether providing infertile couples with individualized lifestyle assessments and ongoing support facilitates positive lifestyle changes enhancing healthy fertility.

METHODS We conducted a prospective cohort pilot study of 23 infertile couples attending an Adelaide-based fertility clinic for advice and treatment relating to infertility. The intervention was a comprehensive assessment interview with the couple, focused on health and lifestyle. Motivational interviewing techniques were used and ongoing support provided. The assessment was repeated after 4 months and included an exit questionnaire. The main outcome measure(s) was self-reported lifestyle changes, including increased exercise, modified diet, reduced caffeine and alcohol consumption, ceased or reduced smoking and decreased psychological stress.

RESULTS Following the initial lifestyle assessment interview, all participants reported adverse lifestyle behaviour.

CONCLUSIONS The results suggest that the FAST (Fertility ASsessment and advice Targeting lifestyle choices and behaviours) approach of an individualized assessment of current lifestyle practice followed by ongoing one to two weekly telephone support is effective in promoting healthy lifestyle change. Larger studies using this methodology are now required.

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Altered trace mineral milieu might play ... [Biol Trace Elem Res. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

Abstract

Insulin resistance is a very common associate of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Pathophysiology in relation with the essential elements including copper, magnesium, zinc, manganese, chromium, and calcium has been reported in women with insulin resistance. This prospective study was designed to explore whether the women with PCOS do exhibit altered serum element levels in association with/without insulin resistance. One hundred and thirty-two women with PCOS and forty-six control women were studied. Women with PCOS were further divided based on the presence of insulin resistance (insulin resistant: n = 50; non-insulin resistant: n = 82). In all women, basal levels of gonadotropins, prolactin, testosterone, insulin, glucose, and the six different elements were measured. Serum levels of testosterone (p < 0.001), luteinizing hormone (p < 0.05), and fasting insulin (p < 0.004) were significantly higher in the PCOS population compared to controls as well as PCOS women without insulin resistance. Women with PCOS exhibited a significantly high calcium (p < 0.04) and lower manganese levels (p < 0.002) when compared to controls. However, the PCOS women with insulin resistance exhibited significantly lower serum levels of magnesium and chromium (p < 0.04), in addition to higher levels of zinc and copper (p < 0.04). The differences in calcium (p < 0.03) and manganese levels (p < 0.0001) became aggravated with the presence of insulin resistance when compared to control as well as PCOS women without insulin resistance. In PCOS-associated insulin resistance, circulating serum magnesium (r = -0.31; p < 0.03) and chromium (r = -0.38; p < 0.006) status significantly correlated with fasting insulin levels. We conclude that imbalanced element status may be a key foundation for insulin resistance in PCOS. The findings in this study should be investigated with further trials in order to obtain new insights into PCOS.

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Human infertility: are endocrine disruptors to blame?

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Endocr Connect. 2013 Sep 17;2(3):R15-29. doi: 10.1530/EC-13-0036. Print 2013.Human infertility: are endocrine disruptors to blame?Marques-Pinto A, Carvalho D.Source

Serviço de EndocrinologiaFaculdade de Medicina da Universidade do Porto, Al. Prof. Hernâni Monteiro, 4200-319 Porto, Portugal Departamento de EndocrinologiaDiabetes e Metabolismo, Centro Hospitalar de São João, Porto, Portugal.

Abstract

Over recent decades, epidemiological studies have been reporting worrisome trends in the incidence of human infertility rates. Extensive detection of industrial chemicals in human serum, seminal plasma and follicular fluid has led the scientific community to hypothesise that these compounds may disrupt hormonal homoeostasis, leading to a vast array of physiological impairments. Numerous synthetic and natural substances have endocrine-disruptive effects, acting through several mechanisms. The main route of exposure to these chemicals is the ingestion of contaminated food and water. They may disturb intrauterine development, resulting in irreversible effects and may also induce transgenerational effects. This review aims to summarise the major scientific developments on the topic of human infertility associated with exposure to endocrine disruptors (EDs), integrating epidemiological and experimental evidence. Current data suggest that environmental levels of EDs may affect the development and functioning of the reproductive system in both sexes, particularly in foetuses, causing developmental and reproductive disorders, including infertility. EDs may be blamed for the rising incidence of human reproductive disorders. This constitutes a serious public health issue that should not be overlooked. The exposure of pregnant women and infants to EDs is of great concern. Therefore, precautionary avoidance of exposure to EDs is a prudent attitude in order to protect humans and wildlife from permanent harmful effects on fertility.

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Adding phytoestrogens to clomiphene ind... [Reprod Biomed Online. 2008] - PubMed - NCBI

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
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Fertility Diet | Food and Infertility | Preganancy Foods

Fertility Diet | Food and Infertility | Preganancy Foods | Food for Fertility | Scoop.it
A diet designed to boost your fertility naturally can help you get pregnant without invasive infertility treatments.
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Scooped by Camille Freeman
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The preconception diet is associated with the cha... [Hum Reprod. 2012] - PubMed - NCBI

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
Camille Freeman's insight:

Find out specifically what this diet entails... sounds like whole food-based diet to me

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