The Rise of Female Filmmakers
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The Rise of Female Filmmakers
"It's not a level playing field [for women]. So get over it. Just believe in yourself and get it done!" -- Debra Chase Martin (Emmy-nominated motion picture and television producer and the first African American woman to have a solo producing deal at a major studio)
Curated by Rayven Routt
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Female Film Directors Slowly Gain Ground

Female Film Directors Slowly Gain Ground | The Rise of Female Filmmakers | Scoop.it
The percentage of female directors on the list of 250 top-grossing films of 2012 jumped to 9 percent from 5 percent in 2011.
Rayven Routt's insight:

While the amount of female filmmakers is still significantly smaller than male filmmakers, women directors are slowly "gaining ground".  9 percent of the top 250 movies at the domestic box office last year were made by female directors. That’s substantially higher than in 2011, with only 5 percent. Martha Lauzen, a San Diego State University professor, tracked the employment of women in the movie industry. She found that the 2012 figure was the highest since 2000, when 11 percent were made by female directors.

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Women dominate at Australian Directors Guild Awards

Women dominate at Australian Directors Guild Awards | The Rise of Female Filmmakers | Scoop.it
Rayven Routt's insight:

Female filmmakers dominated in the major categories at the 2013 Australian Directors Guild Awards. Cate Shortland won the best direction in a feature film. Madeleine Parry was named best director in a documentary. Jessica Hobbs and  Rachel Perkins won direction in TV Drama series. 

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Saudi's First Female Film Director Says Women Aren't Victims

Saudi's First Female Film Director Says Women Aren't Victims | The Rise of Female Filmmakers | Scoop.it
Host Michel Martin speaks to Saudi director Haifaa Al Mansour about her new film, Wadjda.
Rayven Routt's insight:

Haifaa Al Mansour’s Wadjda is the first full-length feature film to be shot and produced in Saudi Arabia. The country is segregated and men and women are not supposed to "mix together". Mansour had to film confined in a van and had to direct with a walkie-talkie and a monitor. She says that she doesn't want "to see women as victims anymore." and that she feels like it's very important to "give them characters that inspire them and give them self-confidence to continue." According to her, the story of the film is simple and not "loud" because being a female filmmaker shooting a movie in Saudi Arabia is controversial enough.

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The Problem of Gender in Hollywood

The Problem of Gender in Hollywood | The Rise of Female Filmmakers | Scoop.it
A comprehensive online screenwriting news and educational magazine.
Rayven Routt's insight:

This artical calls female filmmakers a "starving demographic" and says that Hollywood is beginning to see it's potental. According to a study done by San Diego State University, despite the fact that roughly half of film school graduates are women, only 4% of Hollywood directors are women. 

This artical also lists what the author believes to be the "top ten female filmmakers". On this list is: Mary Harron, Anne Fletcher, Julie Taymore, Betty Thomas, Sophia Coppola, Catherine Hardwicke, Nany Meyers, Nora Ephon, and Kathryn Bigelow, 

 

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Women Filmmaking Pioneers

Women Filmmaking Pioneers | The Rise of Female Filmmakers | Scoop.it
The history of women filmmakers is a rich and fertile body of knowledge that has been largely ignored, until recently, by mainstream film historians.
Rayven Routt's insight:

Contrary to popular belief, women were even more involved in the production end of filmmaking during the beginning years of motion pictures than they are now. The accomplisments of women directors and producers of the past are overlooked and women are often mistaken to have been merely sex objects in front of the camera. 
However, women filmmakers worked in the early primitive color techniques such as hand painting and stamping and created some of the first examples of sound films. Many women are to thank for the creation of film including, Alice Guy, Gene Gauntier, Hanna Henning, Ida May Park, Olga Preobrazhenskaya, Nell Shipman, Ruth Stonehouse, Lucille McVey Drew, Elvira Notari, Lois Weber, Dorothy Arzner, Germaine Dulac, Marie Epstein, Grace Cunard, and many others. 

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How Two Women Aim To Get More Female Directors Behind the Camera

How Two Women Aim To Get More Female Directors Behind the Camera | The Rise of Female Filmmakers | Scoop.it
The women behind Tangerine Entertainment saw a problem and created a company to help fix it: By getting more women behind the camera, one project at a time.
Rayven Routt's insight:

Only 4.4% of studio movies were directed by women in the past ten years. Producers Amy Hobby and Anne Hubbell are trying to do something about this by launching Tangerine Entertainment. The mission statement of Tangerine Entertainment states that it's aim is to increase the amount of "smart, complex, women both behind and infront of the camera". They think that a good way of doing this is by convinving more women to invest in film. Right now, the majority of investors are white men and they typically choose films that they can relate to the most. 

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Girls on Film: Independent film's shining, female-centric example

Girls on Film: Independent film's shining, female-centric example | The Rise of Female Filmmakers | Scoop.it
Big Hollywood blockbusters treat women as an afterthought. Independent film is a totally different story.
Rayven Routt's insight:

Women make up more than half of the population of America, but are largely unrepresented in every aspect of film. In 2012, Martha Lauzen found that women made up 5 percent of Hollywood directors, a 4-point decrease from 1998. In May, another study noted less than 30 percent of speaking characters in last year’s popular films were female. Another study revealed that the percentage of female script writers with sales decreaed form 14 percent in the 1990s to 9 percent in the last two years.

However, in Independent film, there's a 50-50 split between female and male directors.

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Feminist Film Theory

Feminist Film Theory | The Rise of Female Filmmakers | Scoop.it
Rayven Routt's insight:

Feminist Film Theory was first dominatley exemplified by Screen and Camera Obscura, feminist media study journals in the early '70s. The theory is based off the feminist claim that men and women are differentially positioned by cinema: "men as subjects identifying with agents who drive the film's narrative forward, women as objects for masculine desire and fetishistic gazing." The theory is problematic because it uses Freud's Psychoanalytic theory and it is overly abstract. 

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La Fée aux Choux (The Cabbage Fairy), 1896

Directed by Alice Guy Blaché
Rayven Routt's insight:

Alice Guy Blaché (1873-1968), is considered to be the world's first woman filmmaker. She directed and produced hundreds of films, and was the first woman to own and run her own studio plant. She was nicknamed the "Mother of all Narrative Cinema"  and her film, "The Cabbage Fairy" is widely considered to be the first narrative film.

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Kathryn Bigelow wins Oscar for Best Director

Kathryn Bigelow wins Oscar for Best Director | The Rise of Female Filmmakers | Scoop.it
Kathryn Bigelow’s two-fisted win at the Academy Awards has helped dismantle stereotypes about what types of films women can and should direct.
Rayven Routt's insight:

Kathyrn Bigelow was the first woman in the Academy Award's 82 years to win an Oscar for best directing. Dargis, the author of this article, hopes that her win will help to  transform an "industry in which most films star men and are made for and by men." This article also challenges the common idea that women should be making "artificial chick filcks" like the movies of Nora Ephron, rather than  the thriling, violent, "muscular" films that Bigelow makes. 

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