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5 Reasons Internal Dialogue is Essential in Fiction (And How to Use It in Your Story)

5 Reasons Internal Dialogue is Essential in Fiction (And How to Use It in Your Story) | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
For a reader to invest their time in our story, they need to care what happens. Internal dialogue is one of the tools at our disposal to make them care because it creates an intimate connection bet...

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Penelope's curator insight, September 1, 2015 8:23 PM

 

The voice inside our heads. We have that running dialogue going on all the time. How do we show it in our writing?

 

Great blog post by Marcy Kennedy that gives us some great tips for using internal dialogue properly.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: https://warriorwriters.wordpress.com/2015/08/11/5-reasons-internal-dialogue-is-essential-in-fiction-and-how-to-use-it-in-your-story/

 

Jacques Goyette's curator insight, October 5, 2015 7:18 PM

I never paid much attention to this part of writing, but used I.D. intuitively when necessary. Nice of you to remind us.

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Scribophile - Writing Rightly

Scribophile - Writing Rightly | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

"He Said, She Said: Dialog Tags and Using Them Effectively."


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Penelope's curator insight, October 30, 2013 6:01 PM

 

Dialogue can trip up even the most seasoned of writers. You can read about it all day long, but until you're actually writing and needing to use dialogue tags (or speech tags), you'll probably skip over this stuff.

 

Think of these tags as signposts, pointing to who is actually doing the talking. Each tag contains at least one noun or pronoun. (said, asked, whispered, remarked).

 

Susannah said

the clerk asked

she said and took off her coat

he said, looking sad

 

As I am writing my current novel, I sail merrily along, adding in some dialogue tags with ease, and getting myself mired in the mud at others.

 

Do I use he said or she said? Where does that comma go? Should I use a more expressive tag?

 

One thing to keep in mind: the "he/she said," or "he/she asked" will disappear in the reader's mind, while adding in an expressive tag will make it stick out like a sore thumb.

 

Read on if you, too, need a college lesson in drumming up the proper speech tag.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.scribophile.com/academy/he-said-she-said-dialog-tags-and-using-them-effectively

 

Jacques Goyette's curator insight, October 31, 2013 4:44 PM

Tis is how dialog tags should be used.