FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
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Homeland of tea

Homeland of tea | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"China is the world’s biggest tea producer, selling many varieties of tea leaves such as green tea, black tea, oolong tea, white tea and yellow tea. Different regions are famous for growing different types of tea. Hangzhou is famous for producing a type of green tea called Longjing or the Dragon Well tea. Tea tastes also vary regionally. Drinkers in Beijing tend to prefer jasmine tea while in Shanghai prefer green tea. Processing raw tea leaves for consumption is a time and labor-intensive activity and still done by hand in many areas in China. The Chinese tea industry employs around 80 million people as farmers, pickers and sales people. Tea pickers tend to be seasonal workers who migrate from all parts of the country during harvest time. In 2016, China produced 2.43 million tons of tea."


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brielle blais's curator insight, May 2, 8:45 AM
This shows the importance of a product to a countries economy, culture, and use of physical geography. China is the worlds biggest producer of tea. This stimulates the economy greatly, and gives 80 millions people jobs as farmers, pickets and in sales. Exporting the tea to other countries also helps the economy. The workers are seasonal, and travel to the tea come harvest season. This also boost the economy in the travel sector. Tea is also hugely part of the cultural geography of China as it is believed to bring wisdom and lift the spirit to a higher level. 
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, May 2, 9:49 PM
(East Asia) China, the founder of tea, is the largest producer of the most consumed drink in the world. With such an enormous country, regional differences between tea cultivation and culture naturally developed. There are approximately 80 million people involved in tea cultivation, which is non-mechanized in many parts. Linking tea with sanctity, farmers work long hours and come from across China seasonally.

A series of images follows the article. Most remarkable are the depictions of old and young Chinese farmers handpicking tea leaves, the vast plantations and agricultural architecture, and the tea tourism industry
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, May 3, 10:04 PM
This article looks into how the popular beverage, tea, is produced. China is not only the world's largest producer, but also creates many different types of tea including green, black and dragons well. The drink was discovered in 2737 by a Chinese emperor, and the industry employs approximately 80 million people and it produced 2.43 million tons in 2016
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Washington Journal Tim Frazier Discusses Hurricane Irma Disaster

Washington Journal Tim Frazier Discusses Hurricane Irma Disaster | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Georgetown University's Tim Frazier talks about the federal government's management of disaster relief related to Hurricanes Irma and Harvey.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 12, 2017 2:10 PM

Tim Frazier is not only a fantastic geographer with an expertise in disaster management, he was also my volleyball partner on the "Bad Latitudes" team at Penn State.  Good job Tim; great geographic insight and context to understand the response efforts.

 

Tags: disasters, weather and climate.

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Discover the world’s most important airport you never knew about in VR

Every day, pilots from around the world depend on the air traffic controllers at Gander International Airport to help them navigate the North Atlantic. O
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The Most Popular Foods in 11 Major US Cities

The Most Popular Foods in 11 Major US Cities | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The West Coast really loves their tacos.
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As Warming Brings More Malaria, Kenya Moves Treatment Closer to Home

As Warming Brings More Malaria, Kenya Moves Treatment Closer to Home | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
​​Malaria cases are on the increase in Kenya, and experts attribute the upsurge to changes in the climate
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Mapping Coastal Flood Risk Lags Behind Sea Level Rise

Mapping Coastal Flood Risk Lags Behind Sea Level Rise | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Federal maps help determine who on the coast must buy flood insurance, but many don't include the latest data. Maryland is now making its own flood maps, so homeowners can see if they're at risk.
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Mr Mac's curator insight, August 8, 2017 4:54 PM
Unit 1 - Uses of Geography, Human-Environment Interaction
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What on Earth Is Wrong With Connecticut?

What on Earth Is Wrong With Connecticut? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Conservatives say the state has a tax problem. Liberals say it has an inequality problem. What it really has is a city problem.

 

Connecticut is losing rich companies (and their tax revenues) while it’s adding low-wage workers, like personal-care aides and retail salespeople. Yet it remains a high-tax state. That’s a recipe for a budget crisis.

 

The rise and fall of Connecticut fits into the story of American cities. In the 1970s, American metros were suffering a terrible crime wave, and New York was dropping dead. That meant boom times for New York’s suburbs and southwestern Connecticut. But now many of those companies are moving back, lured by newly lower-crime cities and the hip urban neighborhoods where the most educated young workers increasingly want to live.

 

Finally, the hottest trend in American migration today is south, west, and cheap—that is, far away from Connecticut, both geographically and economically. Texas is growing rapidly, and seven of the 10 fastest-growing large metropolitan areas in 2016 were in the Carolinas and Florida. Of the 20 fastest-growing metros, none are in the northeast.

 

Tags: urban, regions, economic.


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Mr Mac's curator insight, August 8, 2017 4:58 PM
Unit 4 - Local Politics, Unit 6 - Economic Development, Unit 7 - Urban 
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This Map Shows The Literal Meaning Of Every State Name

This Map Shows The Literal Meaning Of Every State Name | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Flattened Water. Place of the Small Spring. Milky Water. At first glance, these phrases might look like just a jumble of words, but they’re actually something way cooler: the literal translation of three state names in the United States. Can you guess which ones? Expedia Canada put together this colorful map

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Why 'Brain Drain' Can Actually Benefit African Countries

Why 'Brain Drain' Can Actually Benefit African Countries | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
A new study reveals that the farther African migrants move, the more they increase exports in their home countries.

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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, May 28, 2014 11:44 AM

This is an interesting, although less-commonly heard analysis of the impacts of emigration.

 

Here is an opposing opinion: nyti.ms/1oK6dM4

 

For students: Summarize and contrast the opinions of the authors in the two articles linked in this post.

 

Bonus: Evaluate the opinions of each author. Be sure to explain your thinking.

Mr Mac's curator insight, July 18, 2017 3:13 PM
Unit 3 - Interregional Migration, Brain Drain, Unit 6 - Economic Development
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If you’re on the beach, this map shows you what’s across the ocean

If you’re on the beach, this map shows you what’s across the ocean | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The map above shows the countries that are due east and west from points along the coasts of North and South America. Many small island nations are (perhaps unfairly) excluded for ease of reading. Many thanks to Eric Odenheimer for sharing the map with Know More.

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Californians Keep Up With Joneses’ Water Use

Californians Keep Up With Joneses’ Water Use | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
In the five months since a drought emergency was declared, Californians have barely cut their water consumption, leading some residents to get personal about waste.

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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, July 14, 2014 4:03 PM

This article discusses various methods being used by officials to encourage water conservation by residents across California. Some media outlets are using the term "drought shaming" to describe the social media posts popping up where residents publicly point out others' wastefulness.

 

For my students: What do you think of "drought shaming"? Is it appropriate or inappropriate? Be sure to thoroughly explain your thinking.

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Infographic: The Demographic Timebomb - A Rapidly Aging Population

Infographic: The Demographic Timebomb - A Rapidly Aging Population | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The percentage of the global population that is 65+ will double from 10% to 20% by 2050, creating potential economic headwinds especially for millennials.

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Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 12:38 PM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:37 PM

Buildings, skyscrapers and urbanization. Why not? This is how the world is and this is what attacks tourists. For Shanghai, they need to be up to par with all the other business and tech savvy countries and cities. This is how they are going to keep their technological business, by building what needs to be built. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:16 PM

unit 7

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See the Extreme Cost of Extreme Weather

See the Extreme Cost of Extreme Weather | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Hurricanes Harvey and Irma have made 2017 one of the costliest years in U.S. history.
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Discover the world’s most important airport you never knew about in VR

Every day, pilots from around the world depend on the air traffic controllers at Gander International Airport to help them navigate the North Atlantic. O
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Why geography matters now more than ever

Why geography matters now more than ever | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Students need to know human geography; they need to understand the relationships that exist between cultures."


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LRC's curator insight, September 4, 2017 6:08 PM
Share your insight
Ivan Ius's curator insight, September 5, 2017 11:38 AM
Geographic concepts: Patterns & Trends; Interrelationships; Geographic Perpsective
Uart.com's curator insight, September 8, 2017 5:22 AM

Geography is more important than ever to explain and understand the art market in globalization and digitization turn.

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The ‘silver tsunami’ is quickly approaching. What can Virginia Beach do to prepare? | Southside Daily

The ‘silver tsunami’ is quickly approaching. What can Virginia Beach do to prepare? | Southside Daily | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
VIRGINIA BEACH – Over the next couple of decades, populations will start to look a bit different. There’s a dynamic shift happening, creating an age wave…
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Mapping Coastal Flood Risk Lags Behind Sea Level Rise

Mapping Coastal Flood Risk Lags Behind Sea Level Rise | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Federal maps help determine who on the coast must buy flood insurance, but many don't include the latest data. Maryland is now making its own flood maps, so homeowners can see if they're at risk.
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Weird Borders: State Borders of the United States of America

Ever wondered why Michigan has two pieces? How about why Alaska isn't connected to the rest of the United States? The state borders are a lot weirder tha
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Mr Mac's curator insight, August 8, 2017 5:00 PM
Unit 4 - Borders, Political Geography
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China warns India over 'military buildup' at border

China warns India over 'military buildup' at border | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Beijing demands New Delhi must 'immediately withdraw troops' from disputed border amid Donglang stand-off.

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A Remote Paradise Island Is Now a Plastic Junkyard

A Remote Paradise Island Is Now a Plastic Junkyard | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Henderson Island is isolated and uninhabited—but its beaches are still covered in garbage.  

 

Henderson Island (article or podcast) is about the most remote place you can visit without leaving the planet. It sits squarely in the middle of the South Pacific, 3,500 miles from New Zealand in one direction and another 3,500 miles from South America in the other.  Henderson should be pristine. It is uninhabited. Tourists don’t go there. There’s no one around to drop any litter. The whole place was declared a World Heritage Site by the United Nations in 1988. The nearest settlement is 71 miles away, and has just 40 people on it. And yet, seafaring plastic has turned it into yet another of humanity’s scrapheaps.

 

Tags: pollution, Oceania, water, environment, sustainability, consumption.


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M Sullivan's curator insight, November 29, 2017 11:23 PM
Useful for the IDU topic of plastic single use water bottles.
Katie Kershaw's curator insight, April 26, 1:49 PM
If I had looked at this picture without the context, I would think it was somewhere where people had stayed for a while and then left the place trashed with their own garbage.  In reality,  this is an island that is 3500 miles away from the nearest major settlement and doesn’t have any human inhabitants.  This really exemplifies that even though plastic waste may not be in one’s backyard, it never truly goes away.  Plastic is a material that cannot be broken down, so when it is dumped it just moves around until it hits land.  The article pointed out that plastic is incredibly difficult to clean up, particularly on places like Henderson Island.  When it floats in the ocean for a long time, it becomes brittle and breaks into very small fragments.  Those small fragments then mix with the sand and get buried, making it impossible to get rid of.  Another fact about this island that was shocking is that 3,750 pieces of litter wash up everyday, which is 100,000 times than other islands.  Henderson Island is not suitable for humans to live on, as there is no freshwater, frequent storms, and incredibly sharp terrain.  It is interesting that an island that keeps humans away can’t defend itself against plastic.  The reach of humans extends far beyond what they imagine and even uninhabitable land is infested with human waste.  No matter how remote a place is, it will still be effected by people.
Christina Caruso's curator insight, April 28, 2:55 PM
This picture is Henderson Island, its one of the most remote place you could visit without leaving the planet. It sits in the middle of the South Pacific, 3,500 miles from New Zealand in one direction and another 3,500 from South America in the other. The Island should be pristine, it is uninhabited.  Tourists don't go there and no one around to drop any little.  The whole beach is covered in litter
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The Most Popular Baseball Team by County

The Most Popular Baseball Team by County | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
In honor of Opening Day, Facebook released data on the most popular Major League teams in every county.

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Mr Mac's curator insight, July 18, 2017 3:14 PM
Unit 1 - Maps and Data, Functional Regions; Unit 3 - Folk Sports; Unit 6 - Markets
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Threats of the World's Coral Reefs


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dilaycock's curator insight, June 4, 2014 11:04 PM

Nice summary.Useful discussion starter.

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3 easy ways to tell if a viral photo is bogus

3 easy ways to tell if a viral photo is bogus | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Many people posting it wrote that the photo was taken during the recent Nepal earthquakes, and that it depicts 'a brother protecting his sister.' Pretty heartwarming, right? It’s the exact sort of thing your aunt would share on Facebook. A perfectly clear, resonant message about survival and empathy and inequality, all that good stuff.  There’s only one problem: That picture is fake."


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:43 AM

course resource, life resource :)

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 27, 2015 1:05 PM

This picture supposedly taken in Nepal of a brother protecting his younger sister due to recent earthquakes is, in fact, false. These kinds of photos portraying helpless people in foreign countries are often created to increase Instagram likes and retweets on twitter. Some times are real photos of someone or something going through tragedy, but often they are not.    

Wendy Zaruba's curator insight, June 2, 2015 9:21 AM

This is a GREAT Tip for checking out all those sad stories you see on Facebook and Twitter.  Once again Thank You Google!!

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Where Working Women Are Most Common

Where Working Women Are Most Common | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Female employment rates have continued rising in most rich countries, but they have been falling in the United States since 2000.

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