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11 Facts About Food Deserts

11 Facts About Food Deserts | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Food insecurity has a high correlation with increased diabetes rates. In Chicago, the death rate from diabetes in a food desert is twice that of areas with access to grocery stores."


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Harley Bass's curator insight, January 10, 3:11 PM

This article is connected to human geography by agriculture. We talk and learn about agriculture every day in the class room. I feel like this article is a eye opener to the naive mind of people who do not live in or around food desert areas.

Hailey Austin's curator insight, January 10, 3:22 PM
This is connected to my class because its dealing with agriculture and how they have limited crops. So most of there food is manufactured and unhealthy. I think that food deserts should either be shut down or given better food options.In Chicago, the death rate from diabetes in a food desert is twice that of an area with access to a grocery store.
Mitchell Tasso's curator insight, January 11, 8:57 PM

This article/scoop is very intriguing and cool to read. It goes along with the topic of agriculture and describes the 11 facts that it bares about food deserts whether those facts are good or bad. Overall, I liked this scoop because of the 11 facts and the detail that was provided with them.

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Cities with the widest gap between rich, poor

Cities with the widest gap between rich, poor | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Based on the Gini coefficient, a measure that captures the level of income distribution in a given area, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the 20 metropolitan areas with the most uneven income distribution, or the highest Gini coefficients. A Gini coefficient of 1 means all income belongs to a single individual, while a coefficient of 0 reflects a perfectly even distribution. The Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut, metro area leads the nation with the worst income distribution.With only a few exceptions, the metro areas with the widest gaps between rich and poor residents tend to have lower median household incomes. The majority of the 20 metro areas with the highest Gini coefficients have median household incomes more than $10,000 below the national median of $52,250.Average incomes, however, tell a different story. Because of the uneven income distribution, the average income is much higher in most of these metro areas.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 13, 2015 8:48 AM

The Gini index which measures the degree of economic inequality (the Gini coefficient was added to the APHG course content for the Industrialization and Economic Development unit in 2013).  This article explains the value of the Gini coefficient without delving much into the statistics.  


Tagsstatistics, APHG, poverty, socioeconomic, development, economic.

Chelsea Martines's curator insight, August 29, 2015 2:21 PM

The article discusses the gaps between high income families and low income families in cities. This is mesured by what is called Gini coefficient and look so at a city's amount of poverty and wealthy people. The average income of a city is different and does not tell the imbalance between the high and low income families. It makes a city with a big divider in the two extremes not noticeable because ito makes the city look all around wealthy because of the weight of the higher income people. The Gini coefficient is different and shows that either there is a large majority of families that are wealthy in a city or of low income. Statistics for this have risen over the past decade dramatically since 2007. 

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Imagine life without a proper toilet: that's the reality for 1 in 3 people

Imagine life without a proper toilet: that's the reality for 1 in 3 people | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
It’s 2014. So why do we still need World Toilet Day? Because 2.5 billion people still need one. World Toilet Day remains a critical means to raise awareness globally about one of the many important things…

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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 2015 1:10 AM

This article made me appreciate the fact that I have a toilet. Although I know that many people in world do not have toilets, I did not know the extent of the problems caused by the lack of toilets. It's sad to know that so many children are dying everyday from preventable illnesses that people in developed countries hardly know anyone can die from. I think a lot of the problems of lack of sanitation is caused by corrupt governments and inefficient international action. Although these supranational organizations give money to these poor countries to aid them in creating better sanitation systems, the corrupt governments in these countries use the money not on their own people, leaving the people to suffer more. What makes the problem worse is the fact that many of these countries without sanitation systems face the largest population booms, which worsens the issue of sanitation even more. 

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16 Children & Their Bedrooms From Around the World…

16 Children & Their Bedrooms From Around the World… | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
What did your childhood bedroom look like? Chances are if you grew up in a westernized world, it had a solid bed, scattered toys, and wall decorations that creatively expressed the type of child you were, and hinted at the person you were to become. What you may have taken for granted, however, a large percent of others will never experience. There’s no right or wrong pertaining to living situations, but many unique lessons to be gained from acknowledging that the type of childhood one is given has an impressionable effect on their future.

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dilaycock's curator insight, September 15, 2014 8:20 PM

What a great way to connect with students and discuss issues such as lifestyle, living standards, health etc.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 18, 2014 5:34 AM

Personal geographies - perspectives and worldviews

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Gallery: What inequality looks like

Gallery: What inequality looks like | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Artists, designers, photographers and activists share one image that encapsulates what inequality means to them.

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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, June 16, 2014 9:28 AM

Galería de Imágenes acerca de la desigualdad como consecuencia de la pobreza.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 2014 9:32 AM

powerful images that define unit 6!

Rianne Tolsma's curator insight, June 18, 2014 7:07 AM

add your insight...

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Yardstick of Wealth

"In the last of a series of programmes exploring global population for the award-winning This World strand, Rosling presents an 'as live' studio event featuring cutting-edge 3D infographics painting a vivid picture of a world that has changed in ways we barely understand – often for the better."


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Kibet Koskei's curator insight, November 2, 2013 4:19 AM

ATTENTION !
Get Paid To Enlighten African Youth On How To Use The Internet To Grow Rich ! Re: Ref:Jobs Are Moving Online, Lets Us Help You Acquire The Skills Of 21st Century and Help You To Be A head Of the Masses in Getting Online Jobs!
http://www.firstandfastcapital.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=690&Itemid=623

Sue Bicknell's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:37 AM

Another fantastic presentation by Rosling

Rola Fahs's curator insight, November 13, 2013 10:27 AM

Rosling does a great job speaking of poverty and population. This would be an awesome text to use in a unit about poverty. This can be incorporated in a history class, economics class, sociology class, even an anthropology class if it is offered in highschools. 

It is a perfect length video that can be used to introduce a writing assignment, a research project, or an in class group assignment. But it also shows the extremety of poor vs. rich. From what I have seen students like to state their opinions about issues like this. Teachers may have to watch out how they introduce this into their topic or discussion, but it is a worthwhile source to use. 

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Developed vs developing maps

Developed vs developing maps | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Geography can be difficult to teach - sometimes it can seem like it's mostly just facts and places. Regions. Types of mining in different places. Weather patterns. Vegetation. Lots of, well . . . b...

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dilaycock's curator insight, July 18, 2013 3:40 AM

Interesting ways to stimulate discussion of Developed and Developing Worlds.


via @Stephen_H

Gabe Tucker's comment, September 10, 2013 8:33 PM
It is quite obvious to see which countries are developed and which countries are still developing. The obvious developed areas are the USA, Western Europe, and a majority of India and China. The developing areas are South America, Eastern Europe/Asia, and Australia. Africa is mostly undeveloped. These trends are due to technology and finances. The countries with the most technology are more developed, and the countries with the least technology are still developing or are not developed at all.
Justin McFarland's comment, September 12, 2013 9:32 PM
It's interesting to see what countries have developed and what countries are still finding there way in this world; whether its with technology, government policy, but in this case ... its maps.
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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.

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Outside the Amtrak Window, a Picture of the U.S. Economy

Outside the Amtrak Window, a Picture of the U.S. Economy | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The death and life of the industrial corridor linking New York and Washington.

 

This article is a great example of analyzing the landscape to observe changes in any given place.  This corridor is home to 8 of the 10 wealthiest counties; at the same time this transportation corridor is also home a half a dozen of the country's most broken cities.  Exploring this area is way to analyze the changing economic geographies of the United States.  For a visual representation of these same themes, see this 5 minute video that corresponds to this NY Times magazine article. 

 

Tags: industry, economy, unit 6 industy, transportation, neighborhood, landscape.


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Don Brown Jr's comment, November 20, 2012 12:06 PM
I can’t help but think of Rhode Island, specifically communities in Providence and how the decline of the textile industry and rise of the automobile has affected the contrast in standards of living and opportunities between the residents of the East Side and South Providence.
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Mexico's 'maquiladora' labor system keeps workers in poverty

Mexico's 'maquiladora' labor system keeps workers in poverty | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Some four decades after welcoming foreign assembly plants and factories, known as maquiladoras, Mexico has seen only a trickle of its industrial and factory workers join the ranks of those who even slightly resemble a middle class." 

 

Despite making such consumer goods like BlackBerry smartphones, plasma TVs, appliances and cars that most people in the US, for instance, consider necessities, Mexican workers in these factories seldom get to enjoy these items because, as this article argues, the labor system keeps them in poverty.  Foreign investment in these businesses keep unions out and attracts workers from poorer areas, allowing low-cost labor to prevail.  Less than $8 a day is the going wage - great for the bottom line and consumer prices but very bleak for those who toil in this system.


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Olga Varlamov's curator insight, November 23, 2013 8:26 PM

This article talks about how the maquiladora labor system dosen't provide enough money for it's workers. Many in Mexico are living in poverty and can't afford much more than dinner because of their low wages.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:47 PM

The labor system keeps workers in Poverty. This is the argument that is transitioned by stating the fact that many factory workers are and will always remian in poverty if they have no oppurtunity to move up in the food chain and become educated in order to get themselves out of poverty. They need different skills in order to aquire a better job to create a better life.  

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, February 11, 2015 11:33 PM

Its a very sad situation reading this. Seeing people go through all this to just survive. Kids don't even get any education and follow their parents footsteps to work at a plant just to be able to pay for bills. 8 dollars a day, and you wonder why they try to run to united states. Its very unfortunate that a lot of people go through this and i hope it changes soon, because to see that this is going on makes me thankful for what i have around me. Foreign investors are not great as they set out to be take advantage of the poor and get rich out of it, i think its pretty ridiculous.

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The Subtle Design Features That Make Cities Feel More Hostile

The Subtle Design Features That Make Cities Feel More Hostile | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Think your city doesn’t like you? You’re right.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 6, 2016 11:51 AM

Geography explores more than just what countries control a certain territory and what landforms are there.  Geography explores the spatial manifestations of power and how place is crafted to fit a particular vision.  Homeless people are essentially always 'out of place.'  These articles from the Society Pages, Atlas Obscura, the Atlantic and this one from the Guardian share similar things: that urban planners actively design places that will discourage loitering, skate boarding, and homelessness, which are all undesirable to local businesses.  This gallery shows various defensive architectural tactics to make certain people feel 'out of place.'  Just to show that not all urban designs are anti-homeless, this bench is one that is designed to help the homeless (and here is an ingenious plan to curb public urination).  

    

Tags: urbanplanning, architecture, landscape, place, poverty.

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These two maps show the shocking inequality in Baltimore

These two maps show the shocking inequality in Baltimore | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
How vacant houses trace the boundaries of Baltimore's black neighborhoods.


The map on the left shows one very tiny dot for each person living in Baltimore. White people are blue dots, blacks are green, Asians are red and Hispanics yellow.The map on the right shows the locations of Baltimore City's 15,928 vacant buildings. Slide between the two maps and you'll immediately notice that the wedge of white Baltimore, jutting down from the Northwest to the city center, is largely free of vacant buildings. But in the black neighborhoods on either side, empty buildings are endemic.


Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, economic, race, poverty, spatial, housing.


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 1, 2015 9:37 AM

Unit 7

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, May 24, 2015 9:14 PM

Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use

 

This article is about Sandtown, Baltimore and its shift into a disamenity sector. It explains how this neighborhood, mainly housed by blacks, had a high percentage of vacant houses. The article says that this neighborhood is overrun with poverty, war on drugs and gangs and has the more residents in jail than any other neighborhood. This shows the changing demographics of the city of Baltimore.

 

This relates to unit 7 because it covers the topic of disamenity sectors and changing demographics. It shows reasons for the high levels of poverty and abandoned housing. It also shows the racial spatial distribution of the neighborhood and its correlation to housing and development.  

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2015 1:46 AM

This article left me heart broken. The African American community in Baltimore is stuck in a deep poverty cycle, and it cannot seem to escape its impoverished past. Even now, the poverty in the area seems to just be getting worse. The problems of income disparity lead to more problems than just economic; they lead to social and political problems. Social unrest and injustice occurs as a result of the modern white flight. This article arose as a result of the death of Freddie Gray, whose death demonstrates a significant social issue that needs to be addressed: police brutality and the criminal targeting of the African American community. His death stems from the tremendously amounts of disparity in the city. Promoting investment in the inner city would definitely help alleviate the poverty in the area. The problem is getting people to invest.

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Too rich for its own good

Too rich for its own good | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The Democratic Republic of Congo is potentially one of the richest countries on earth, but colonialism, slavery and corruption have turned it into one of the poorest

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Jacob Conklin's curator insight, May 6, 2015 1:04 PM

Geography talks a lot about the impact of globalization and imperialism. One of the best examples of this is found in The Democratic Republic of Congo. For its entire history, imperialist nations have sought out this country's resources and were not hesitant to exploit the population to accomplish this end. On of the great ironies in globalization is that the countries richest in resources are the most exploited. Take to the extreme as in Congo, the economy is so crushed that there is no way for the country to recover. 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 4, 2015 4:09 PM

Its all about greed. If people only had the respect for each other then with all the natural resources on earth we all could live comfortably.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:40 PM

It's a shame to know that there's a country of hopelessness out there with a potential to be a great one. The long term causes of colonialism had a huge impact on their development as a modern country. They were once a great empire but was diminished down to nothing by the European. Hopefully there will light to the darkness of Congo in the near future.

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Poop Stories

Poop Stories | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"From the time we’re about 6 years old, everyone loves a good poop joke, right? But is there something more meaningful lurking beneath the bathroom banter? Take a look at some international potty humor and then follow the jokes to a deeper understanding. Every laugh on this page reflects a life and death issue: the very real sanitation problems facing India today."


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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, November 10, 2014 4:19 PM

It is fascinating that a country so many lives are lost due to something we find simple and trivial, and really do not even think about but use on a daily basis.

Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's curator insight, November 18, 2014 7:03 PM

World toilet day!

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 4:49 PM

Often when people are faced with a tragic fact they instantly attempt to shut it out because it makes them uncomfortable. In the same way Americans can walk past five homeless people a day and not bat and eye...its easier. Using comedy to address a dire situation such as India's sanitation standards, is an ingenious way to get people to actually listen

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Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty

Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:59 AM

See where the wealth and poverty are in America using this great map.

Chandrima Roy's curator insight, January 9, 2014 10:44 PM

wonderful

 

Ishwer Singh's curator insight, January 20, 2014 6:56 AM

This picture shows the cocentrations of poverty and affluence.  The areas hilighted in yellow show the areas which are wealthy and the dark blue showing the poor. This coincides with the amout of pay and the education levels in these countries. Areas such as Boston, New York and Washington show high cocentrations of affluence. These areas also have much higher education systems and more well -paid jobs. Countries which are highlighted in dark blue are countries with lesser education and lesser paid jobs. This shows the  extent at which poverty can affect a country.

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Inequality and the Gini Coefficient

Inequality and the Gini Coefficient | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Think everyone should just pull themselves up by their bootstraps? Try this one on for size.

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:00 PM

Educating in poverty

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:47 AM

Do you find this information surprising?

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:20 AM

This video shows the place matters; a Washington D.C. educator shows how food deserts and other spatial problems of poverty impact his students on a daily basis.  We usually look at life expectancy data at the national scale and that obscures some of the real issues of poverty in developed countries.  Above is a map that shows the Gini index which measures the degree of economic inequality (the Gini coefficient was recently added to the APHG course content for the Industrialization and Economic Development unit).  Here are some maps and data from the World Bank that utilizes the Gini Index as well as an interactive Gapminder graph.  


Tags: industry, location, place, migration, APHG, poverty, socioeconomic.

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Food stamps put RI town on monthly boom-and-bust cycle

Food stamps put RI town on monthly boom-and-bust cycle | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 24, 2013 10:06 AM

Rhode Island is one of five states in which the number of people getting  help from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP-formerly known as 'food stamps') has more than doubled since 2008. In 2012, 16 percent of its residents received aid from the program. Read the related article.  The article details how Woonsocket's economy is impacted by these monthly fluctuations is disposable income.  Why is Rhode Island one of that states with a doubling participation in this program?  What other spatial patterns to you see? 


Tags: Rhode Islandeconomic, mapping, poverty, community.

Dias Vidia's curator insight, April 2, 2013 2:05 AM

http://redgage.com/photos/macb/postage-us-liberty-of-all-15-c.html

Kendra King's curator insight, January 28, 2015 7:53 PM

The story of food stamps displays how the government aide helps more than the individuals in the short term. I always knew that the people on food stamps benefited because they are now obviously able to eat better than they would if left on their own. However, I never really realized just how much of the government money also went back into the businesses. Without that money I am sure some of the stores would have closed sooner. I say sooner because since this article was written in 2013 a good deal of stores in Woonsocket closed or relocated (Shaw’s, Walmart, Dots, Home Depot, and Staples). Seeing firsthand how many businesses closed of recent is a clear indication of how the aid wasn’t enough. Still even going based on the information in the article, there were other indications of Woonsocket’s lagging business economy. For instance, one section mentions how Jourie thought Woonsocket was a “town disappeared into twisting two-lane roads, shadowy mills and abandoned smokestacks.” Mills were a strong economic center so long ago that the buildings should have been updated by more modern businesses. Yet, this hasn’t happened. It is a wonder how Woonsocket hasn’t figured out a way to attract more business from surrounding towns sooner given that government aide won’t keep business going.

 

Still, the people under this system are part of a process that doesn’t seem to stop repeating. Following the perspective of Rebecka, you see how businesses just tries to tempt the consumers who all flock to the stores on the first of the month falsely believing they are getting a better deal. Then you watch Rebecka try to shop under stress thereby causing her to spend money she shouldn’t be either. Then, when all is said and done, she looks longingly at the start of the calendar for the next first of the month. It appears the first of the month is on her mind even before it is well in sight. This type of thinking seems to trap Rebecka in an endless cycle of poverty. While I sympathize for the women who tried to get more work, she shouldn’t just continue on in a dead end job while barely surviving on food stamps. Go back to school, spread out how you spend the money, (maybe try saving some of it for more necessary items rather than tattoos), and change the cycle. The factors in the article show how this could be hard to do, but it isn’t impossible for her to gain control of her own life either.     

 

While I understand this trap is partly a result of the economic recession, there were other factors at play.  The story was partly told from the perspective of someone with a high school degree, who seemed to stop school because of a child. Given how much little someone makes when an individual fails to continue his/her schooling it is no wonder she is on food stamps. Furthermore, the fact that Woonsocket is full of low income housing continues to explain why so many people with food stamps flock to the town. If the people can’t really afford homes than it is no surprise they are on food stamps too. Woonsocket’s housing prices have always been like this even before the economic recession though. As such, the town’s population was already dependent on food stamps (something I am well aware of given that I live in the town next door). So I wonder just how much the economic recession actually increased the use of food stamps on the already poverty stricken town. 

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.

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The State of Women in the World

The State of Women in the World | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Tags: gender, development, worldwide, poverty.


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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 12, 2013 1:39 PM

Gender Development index - CHapter 9 materials

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:09 AM

This is a great represenaton for showing the unfortunate truth of the state women in the world today.

Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 11:15 AM

Why are women so unequal to men? Why are women in the Middle East seeing such bad treatment and unequality? How can we fix these problems?