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What Are You Flying Over? This App Will Tell You

What Are You Flying Over? This App Will Tell You | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Flyover Country uses maps and data from various geological and paleontological databases to identify and give information on the landscape passing beneath a plane. The user will see features tagged on a map corresponding to the ground below. To explain the features in depth, the app relies on cached Wikipedia articles. Since it works solely with a phone’s GPS, there’s no need for a user to purchase in-flight wifi. Sitting in your window seat, you can peer down on natural features like glaciers and man-made features, such as mines, and read articles about them at the same time.

 

Tags: mobility, transportation, technology, physical, geology.


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The Earthquake That Will Devastate Seattle

The Earthquake That Will Devastate Seattle | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
When the giant fault line along the Pacific Northwest ruptures, it could be our worst natural disaster ever.

 

The Cascadia subduction zone remained hidden from us for so long because we could not see deep enough into the past. It poses a danger to us today because we have not thought deeply enough about the future. The Cascadia situation, a calamity in its own right, is also a parable for this age of ecological reckoning, and the questions it raises are ones that we all now face. How should a society respond to a looming crisis of uncertain timing but of catastrophic proportions? How can it begin to right itself when its entire infrastructure and culture developed in a way that leaves it profoundly vulnerable to natural disaster?


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geographynerd's curator insight, August 9, 2015 2:20 AM

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    

 

Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, January 25, 7:33 PM
The Cascadia fault line in the Pacific Northwest is one that humans should be afraid of. In January of 1700 the Northwest corner of the [then growing] United States, was hit by an extremely powerful earthquake, which, due to overwhelming geographic evidence, is assumed to be a 9.0 on the current Richter scale. The catastrophic event caused the land, which was already being submerged under the neighboring plate to be further submerged and killed a variety of plant life. After further research, seismologists have predicted that the Cascadia is likely a ticking time bomb and any sudden movement where the tectonic plates are touching could pose quite the problem for modern day America. 
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, January 25, 7:36 PM
(North America) It's impressive to see the process connecting soil displacement in the North West to a tsunami in 1700 in Japan and to First Nation stories in Canada. It's also impressive, but much bleaker, that we have such specific numbers and a timeline of what will happen if the inevitable earthquake struck the San Andres fault today. Scientists predict 13,000 people will die in the earthquake and resulting tsunami, compared to the 18,000 who died in the 2011 Japanese earthquake. Whenever the Cascadia earthquake strikes, it will probably affect a much larger area of land, displace hundreds of thousands, and cripple the North West's economy.
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First photographs emerge of new Pacific island off Tonga

First photographs emerge of new Pacific island off Tonga | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

The first photographs have emerged of a newly formed volcanic island in the Pacific Ocean after three men climbed to the peak of the land mass off the coast of Tonga. Experts believe a volcano exploded underwater and then expanded until an island formed. The island is expected to erode back into the ocean in a matter of months.


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Louis Mazza's curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:17 AM

A new one mile island of the coast of Tonga in Oceania west coast of Australia. A volcano exploded underwater, turning lava in rock and pushing through the surface of the ocean to expose a new island. Three men have scaled the peak of the mountain to date. The men say the surface was still hot and the green lake in the crater smelt strongly of sulfur.

                This is great example of geography constantly undergoing changes and new looks and features. Officials say that this island will be eroded away within the next month so they will not even name it I wonder how many islands like this has happened to, or if inhabitants went to live there then the next day there home is underwater. This is another great example of plate tectonic and active under sea forces that we do not see with our eyes, and what most people do not think of on a daily basis, but is working on a daily basis, constantly changing geography and our world. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 7, 2015 9:34 PM

I just find this fascinating.  History is excellent to study but so is the watching history in the making.  This volcanic island formation off the coast of Tonga is a modern day phenomenon which will one day be history.  Some people predict it will erode back into the water but some others think it will be able to last longer.  Either way stuff like this is pretty cool to watch and study while it is happening before your very own eyes.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:20 PM

This is pretty cool that a new island is being formed, due to a volcano that erupted under water. I am sure there are many more in other places, but it is a new opportunity for life, development and travel. Although since it is new, obviously now would not be a good time because you do not want a volcano erupting on people, that would not be an ideal situation. Although, I hope to one day be able to travel to this new island to check it out. 

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Why Do Rivers Curve?


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Sally Egan's curator insight, December 7, 2014 4:27 PM

A very siual form using simple language to explain the meandering of rivers. Applicable to the course work on Hydrosphere.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 27, 2015 12:15 AM

So pretty much, the water controls rivers rather than particles controlling the river. Also, it appears that the motion and strength of the water causes rivers to bend and form in different curves. I'd like to think of it as a ball bouncing from side to side and every time it touches the border land of a river, it expands to the opposite side. However, when the water flow is hitting the side of a river, the opposite side is not getting any force from the water flow. In that case, the side that is not getting hit by the water flow slowly moves to the side that is being by the water flow causing river curves.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2015 2:07 AM

Australian curriculum


The geomorphic processes that produce landforms, including a case study of at least one landform (ACHGK050)


GeoWorld

Chapter 1: Distinctive landform features

Chapter 3: Restless Earth: geomorphic processes 

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How to Follow the Iceland and Papua New Guinea Volcano Eruptions

How to Follow the Iceland and Papua New Guinea Volcano Eruptions | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Webcams, Twitter, and data visualizations show you what's going on with Bárðarbunga and Mount Tavurvur.

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Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 10:50 AM

Air travel was almost all in code red when Iceland’s volcano Bárðarbunga and Papa New Guinea’s volcano Tavurvur erupted at the same time one day. All of Europe was in code red and also the Middle East, East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, Australia, Russia, parts in Africa, and even in parts of South America. All other places such as the United States, United Kingdom and Canada were all in code orange. I’m not sure if this happened by coincidence since Papa New Guinea’s volcano is very active or that it is somehow connected, But I was looking at the tectonic plates and it doesn’t seem like they are connected, but there are plate lines located exactly where the volcanos are. I am guessing this happened dues to both of those plates moving at the same time, creating a simultaneous eruption.

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EnviroAtlas

EnviroAtlas | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

EnviroAtlas is a collection of interactive tools and resources that allows users to explore the many benefits people receive from nature, often referred to as ecosystem services. Key components of EnviroAtlas include the following:

A multi-scaled Interactive Map with broad scale data for the lower 48 states and fine scale data for selected communitiesThe Eco-Health Relationship Browser, which shows the linkages between ecosystems, the services they provide, and human healthEcosystem services information, GIS and analysis tools, and written resources
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s smith's curator insight, May 23, 2014 3:59 PM

This looks great, will be having a play with this soon !

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, May 24, 2014 3:38 PM

Enviro Atlas. Mapa Interactivo.

Allan Tsuda's curator insight, May 25, 2014 9:21 PM

Unbelievable, tremendous resource. I wish I had this one growing up. It is a US gov site (EPA), and is for US geography. I'm betting you can search around for similar sites for other locales around the world. Great demo. Demo runs on Adobe Captivate. The demo took a little bit of time to load on a wired connection through a high speed fiber optic connection. Or skip the demo and play around with the maps. Site not all that fast. Still, it's worth waiting for if you want the data.

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10 Awe-Inspiring Weather Phenomena

10 Awe-Inspiring Weather Phenomena | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
There are reported cases of fish and frogs raining from the sky, as well as ice bombs attacking earthlings from above.

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FCHSAPGEO's comment, September 16, 2013 6:20 PM
I thought I would add that frogs do fly through the air sometimes!
Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 6:28 PM
This post was interesting to me because living in Virginia Beach, we dont see much interesting amounts of snow, nor rainfall, so we dont know about the many things weather can do. Now knowing this about weather makes it more intersting,and makes me wonder what else could happen??
Cam E's curator insight, January 29, 2014 2:20 PM

The mystery of the world is personally one of my favorite topics, as we've not even come close to exploring every inch of our own planet. As much as I want to see us expand outwards, we should not avoid looking to our own planet with an explorer's eye like many did in the past. This particular article makes me wonder how many unexplained events that ended up in folk legend were the cause of some unique weather pattern or then-unexplained event which we better understand today. I personally saw something like this very recently. On a trip up north towards Vermont for some skiing I spotted that the moon was particularly large that one night. Later on as we were passing by Boston we saw what appeared to be a black line cutting straight through the moon. It extended to each end of the horizon and while it was a cloud, no others were in the sky, and it was so uniform throughout that it made me doubt my own common sense!

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Night Sky Comes Alive With Aurora Borealis

Night Sky Comes Alive With Aurora Borealis | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Peak season to spot rare, dazzling night skies over Canada and Alaska."


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Lorraine Chaffer's comment, June 1, 2013 7:49 AM
Aurora Borealis has cultural significance for many people in the arctic
Morgan Stewart's comment, July 25, 2013 9:15 PM
This is so beautiful! Seeing an aurora borealis is one of the things on my bucket list and I really hope I get to experience it.
Chloe Williamson's comment, August 13, 2013 10:12 AM
This is would be an incredible sight to witness! I hope I can see is beautiful aurora one day.
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What If?

What If? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

This blogpost answers the (often unasked) question:  What would the world be like if the land masses were spread out the same way as now - only rotated by an angle of 90 degrees? While purely hypothetical, this is an exercise in applying real geographic thinking to different situations.  Anything that you would correct? 

 

Tags: weather climate, geography, GeographyEducation, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, physical. 


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Dania's comment, September 5, 2012 11:41 PM
well!!!
I'll tell you that it's why God created Mother Nature. maybe what we think is bad now in nature can be worse for the the Earth and human being... I think if the ground is moved 90 degree, many natural phenomena would happened in many regions of the Earth which would be harm to people, plants and animals that live in those regions. Plus, the population of poor nation would not be prepared for those climate changes.... many people would die or they have to move from those regions.
Jeff F's comment, September 6, 2012 12:50 AM
This looks like a map from the classic NES game Dragon Warrior II only flipped upside down. #nerd

Anyways, I think the most densely populated areas would be around the central ocean with New York and London being primate cities of their respected hemispheres.

Given that that the central ocean area is in an equatorial region, agriculture would likely not be very prosperous in these regions. Instead, I imagine New York becoming the center of an imperial superpower. Seeing as the most fertile regions of both South and North America are in temperate areas, agriculture would be a dominating industry.

The northern hemisphere on the other I hand I imagine would be largely undeveloped and rural. The "breadbaskets" of this hemispher are located much further inland from the central ocean.
Ian Roberts's comment, September 11, 2012 8:57 PM
First off I would like to say travel to Europe would be much easier and the Pacific Ocean grew even larger. One thing that really got me wondering was whether the world would be northern hemisphere centered or southern hemisphere centered. Currently, there are many more people in the northern hemisphere, so things like the summer olympics are held in our summer, their winter. BUt with the world turned ninety degrees, the population will be much more similar. The north will probably still have more people, but the south has America. It would be interesting to see how they would decide that conflict.
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America’s year without a winter: The 2015-2016 season was the warmest on record

America’s year without a winter: The 2015-2016 season was the warmest on record | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Every state but two were warmer than normal and all six New England states set winter records.

 

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, climate change.


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California Drought Tests History of Endless Growth

California Drought Tests History of Endless Growth | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
A punishing drought is forcing a reconsideration of whether the aspiration of untrammeled growth that has for so long been the state’s engine has run against the limits of nature.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 6, 2015 8:30 PM

Major urban areas in California have limited local water resources so they draw water from large area to bring in sufficient water for these burgeoning metropolitan regions.  With this current drought getting worse, California has ordered emergency water restrictions on residents while companies and large farms have been granted exemptions even though they account for 82% of the state's annual water consumption (residential accounts for 12%). Almond farms alone consume 10% of the state's water, and many agricultural crops are incredibly water intensive land uses.  A better way to think of it isn't just about raw water usage though.  A better question to ask would be this--how does one gallon of water translate into calories that most efficiently feed people?


Questions to Ponder: How does the concept of carrying capacity relate to California urban growth/drought issues?  California passed its carrying capacity?  How are demographics, economics, politics and the environment intertwined in California?  What are the environmental limits on urban growth and development? 


Tags: physical, weather and climate, consumptionCalifornia, water, environment, resources, environment dependurban ecology.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 9, 2015 8:49 AM

The mathematics of endless growth due to economic monetary rules has a clear outcome.

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Dramatic Confluences

Dramatic Confluences | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Confluences occur wherever two streams come together. If the gradient is low (i.e., nearly level) and the properties of the two streams are very different, the confluences may be characterized by a dramatic visible distinction as the mixing occurs only slowly."

 

Tags:  physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.


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Sylvain Rotillon's curator insight, January 7, 2015 5:47 AM

Wonderful pictures of rivers confluences

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Eerie Landforms

Eerie Landforms | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Utah's Fantasy Canyon features mudstone eroded into bizarre shapes. This one's called "Flying Witch". #Halloween


Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms, Utah.


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Colorado River Reaches the Sea of Cortez

Colorado River Reaches the Sea of Cortez | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"When the Minute 319 'pulse flow' began in March 2014, it was not clear whether the effort would be enough to reconnect the Colorado River with the Sea of Cortez. Some hydrologists thought there might be just enough water; others were less optimistic. It turns out the optimists were right, though just barely. For the first time in sixteen years, the Colorado River was reunited with the Sea of Cortez on May 15, 2014."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 28, 2014 5:57 PM

California has had three consecutive years of below average rainfall and most reservoirs are far below their designed capacity; amid a drought this severe and wildfires, it is startling to hear of a project to restore some of the Colorado River Basin's natural patterns and ecology.  


Tags: physicalremote sensing, California, water, environmenturban ecology.

Kate Buckland's curator insight, June 7, 2014 7:43 PM

Parallels with the Murray River...

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10 Awe-Inspiring Weather Phenomena

10 Awe-Inspiring Weather Phenomena | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
There are reported cases of fish and frogs raining from the sky, as well as ice bombs attacking earthlings from above.

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FCHSAPGEO's comment, September 16, 2013 6:20 PM
I thought I would add that frogs do fly through the air sometimes!
Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 6:28 PM
This post was interesting to me because living in Virginia Beach, we dont see much interesting amounts of snow, nor rainfall, so we dont know about the many things weather can do. Now knowing this about weather makes it more intersting,and makes me wonder what else could happen??
Cam E's curator insight, January 29, 2014 2:20 PM

The mystery of the world is personally one of my favorite topics, as we've not even come close to exploring every inch of our own planet. As much as I want to see us expand outwards, we should not avoid looking to our own planet with an explorer's eye like many did in the past. This particular article makes me wonder how many unexplained events that ended up in folk legend were the cause of some unique weather pattern or then-unexplained event which we better understand today. I personally saw something like this very recently. On a trip up north towards Vermont for some skiing I spotted that the moon was particularly large that one night. Later on as we were passing by Boston we saw what appeared to be a black line cutting straight through the moon. It extended to each end of the horizon and while it was a cloud, no others were in the sky, and it was so uniform throughout that it made me doubt my own common sense!

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Meandering Stream

Meandering Stream | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"I'm used to rivers that know what they're doing."


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Hoffman's comment, September 14, 2013 1:32 PM
hmm, looks like some river had a little to much
Peter Phillips's comment, October 5, 2013 7:31 PM
All rivers move. Those that have a wide, flat basin meander most. Those meanders can be even more dramatic than in this image, snaking 10's of kilometres sideways over time. Combine this action with geological upheaval and it gets even more interesting. Check out images of the Murray River in Australia from space.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, December 6, 2013 11:34 AM

Lol... the first words that went through my head were h--- (heck) yeah.  David Bowie... sung by an astronaut... okay, back to Geography. I thought that the rivers reminded me of something I thought of during the talk in class about lava rock being changed into other kinds of rocks over time, and cycling around.  I thought on a larger scale, about this universe, and I have read before that people are studying different areas of space-time fabrics, trying to find origins of the Universe, and answers to other existential questions.  I suppose that if one could trace patterns of rivers, and if one could trace patterns of rocks, to find where they came from, and why/how they came where they came, then by examining the (assumedly tattered and marked) fabrics of space and time, people would be able to determine origins of everything from the beginning of what existed before all universes, and also the origins of life forms.  I enjoyed the movie Prometheus, which was directed by Sir Ridley Scott, and I had to say that I thought that the messages found on rocks in caves, as a catalyst that lead the cast to go visit an alien world that had something to do with human origins, could be very literally taken.  If there are clues in rocks, why wouldn't there be other clues, possibly in celluar components of life forms, or space and time?  Applying the idea of studying rocks and rivers and other physical geographical pursuits to the idea of applying it on a gigantic scale greatly appeals to me.  I believe that humans will find some answers that way, but I hadn't directly realized just that until we mentioned some stuff about physical geography, and glacial forces carrying and spreading out rocks, and deposits and erosion.  After all, the Milky Way has origins, so why believe that we came from the Milky Way, rather than beyond?

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Dazzling Northern Lights Anticipated Saturday Night

Dazzling Northern Lights Anticipated Saturday Night | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"A solar flare that occurred around 2 a.m. Thursday morning may create a spectacular display of northern lights Saturday evening. The midlevel flare had a long duration and was directed at Earth.  Solar flares create auroras when radiation from the sun reaches Earth and interacts with charged protons in our atmosphere. The effects are greater at the magnetic poles and weaken as they move south from the Arctic or north of the Antarctic. In the northern hemisphere the results are called the aurora borealis, with the aurora australis being its southern counterpart. The result is a spectacular display of light and color for areas with clear enough views."

 


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Yann Chemali's comment, September 12, 2013 7:30 PM
I never thought that it was possible to see see northern lights as south as Nebraska. That's very cool.
Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:43 AM
The aurora borealis (may have butchered that word) is one of the manh beautiful and amazing things that this Earth offers to us! Sadly living in virginia beach it is definitely not as easy to see the lights! Possibly the ONLY reason i would move to alaska/canada and/or some country up north!
Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:43 AM
The aurora borealis (may have butchered that word) is one of the manh beautiful and amazing things that this Earth offers to us! Sadly living in virginia beach it is definitely not as easy to see the lights! Possibly the ONLY reason i would move to alaska/canada and/or some country up north!
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Satellites Reveal Sudden Greenland Ice Melt

Satellites Reveal Sudden Greenland Ice Melt | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
NASA researchers are expressing concern about something they've never seen before: the melting of ice across nearly the entire surface of Greenland earlier this month.

 

Climate changes are afoot in the Arctic and the Greenland ice sheet.  For more on the Arctic, see: http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/jul/26/arctic-climate-change ; In related news, Texas and Louisiana have introduced education standards that require educators to teach climate change denial as a valid scientific position. South Dakota and Utah passed resolutions denying climate change. Tennessee and Oklahoma also have introduced legislation to give climate change skeptics a place in the classroom. http://articles.latimes.com/2012/jan/16/nation/la-na-climate-change-school-20120116


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Sarah Curtis's comment, September 3, 2012 3:33 PM
I didn't know how bad global warming was until I read this article and I don't think many people realize it either. We need to start changing our ways if we want to live in a safe and healthy environment. I think more people need to see images and read articles like this so they have a better knowledge on how little time we have.
Morgan Halsey's comment, September 10, 2012 11:30 PM
Some people still don't believe in global warming, but now with new technology, there is great evidence. New technology has allowed us to explore our world in ways that we have not been able to before. We are now able see things about our world and fix problems before they become worse.
Michael Grant's comment, September 12, 2012 4:12 PM
I am surprised about how the polar ice caps are melting and that global warming is very real, but on the other hand it's just part of the Earth maturing