FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
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Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011)

Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011) | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The map provides a level of detail previously unavailable. It is the first ever to collect data published by all of Europe’s municipalities.

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HumdeBut's curator insight, September 25, 2017 12:12 PM
Voici une carte bien intéressante,où l'on peut voir les pôles d'attraction !
M Sullivan's curator insight, September 28, 2017 9:41 PM
Interesting looking at Europe's population change. Good reference for analysing geographical trends.
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 29, 2017 3:04 AM

Global challenges: Population 

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Declining Populations

Declining Populations | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"All over the continent, potential parents have shown reluctance to have more babies. Hence, governments and advocacy groups are becoming increasingly creative about getting their citizens to make babies."

 

Tag: Europe, declining populations, population, demographic transition model.


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Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 18, 2015 2:18 PM

This is very important for these countries because people are getting older and eventually to keep the country economically, politically, population, socially and most important culturally stable the population needs to rise by birth rates even though it can still rise by immigrations but it would eventually lose its true culture.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:32 PM

After reading such an article, I could not understand why someone would not want to have children, especially with the incentives offered by the governments. Clearly it seems as if Denmark is the most concerned because they take up three out of five of the slots for how Europe is trying to convince its citizens to make more babies. In general, the incentives seem to be very good, good enough for someone to want to have children. In Sweden you get 480 days out of work plus 80% of your previous salary, Denmark says if Danes were successful in conceiving a child while being on a vacation organized by the company, they were eligible to win three years of free diapers and a trip abroad and France pays families monthly allowances to their children who are younger than 20, plus discounts. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 3:01 PM

the fact that these campaigns are necessary in this age where migrants are flooding Europe and the birth rate is declining. its amazing that this is necessary, but with the birthrate declining the only other home to insure their economic system continues to function is to get the migrants working.

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Song: European Union

Song: European Union | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Germany and France spent decades at each others' throats. Now, bound by a common currency, they're working together to save the euro zone. It's a story that's begging for a musical number — which, as it happens, we have right here."


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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:21 AM

Yet, they are both singing in the English man language, like wanted to be heard by glorious England. The European Union is strong, but at the same time fragile. It feel it can break by any politic different.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 15, 2014 6:03 PM

Looking at European history as a whole this recent unity between nations, especially Germany and France is an incredibly new and unusual concept. For centuries European countries have been at one another's throats only in the late 20th century has this changed. While this idea of a musical is humors it shows that because of globalization and economics these nations have bounded together and now are heavily reliant upon one another.   

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 1:04 PM

Its humorous how after years of being in conflict with one another, this song manages to highlight the ways in which France and Germany, along with other European countries have manged to over their differences. Along in this song highlights the things in which these countries are known for demonstrates the pure genius in all of this.

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How one German millennial chose to live on trains rather than pay rent

How one German millennial chose to live on trains rather than pay rent | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"When others get off the train to finally go home, Leonie Müller stays behind. That's because she already is home: The train is her apartment, and she says she likes it that way. She bought a subscription that allows her to board every train in the country free. Now, Müller washes her hair in the train bathroom and writes her college papers while traveling at a speed of up to 190 mph. She says that she enjoys the liberty she has experienced since she gave up her apartment."


Tags: mobility, transportation, housing, popular culture, Europe, Germany. 


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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 9:46 AM

This is no question that living on a train is a radical decision to make. It is a direct challenge to the idea that you are suppose to settle into one particular area. While I doubt that this specific phenomenon will catch on, our society is becoming more mobile.  People are becoming less tied down to one specific area. The Millennial generation is changing many of the previous social norms. The Millennial generation is waiting longer than any previous generation to marry and start a family. Many are even questioning the institution of marriage itself.  Members of the older generations, will decry these changes. This is a familiar cycle that occurs through out history. The Older generation always decries the changes instituted by the Younger generation.

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Why Paris doesn't want a Scottish Yes

Why Paris doesn't want a Scottish Yes | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Nothing unites different nations quite like mutual enemies. But the 'Auld Alliance' between Scotland and France - both historic rivals of England - doesn't mean that the French government favours Scottish independence. Far from it."


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Kevin Barker's curator insight, August 19, 2014 8:59 AM

I was surprised to listen to the affection that Scotland and France have towards each other but I wasn't surprised to hear France's concerns about the further division of countries within the EU.  What is it about the independence of Scotland that causes the French government to be concerned?

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 3:30 PM

APHG-Unit 4

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 14, 2014 1:50 PM

Even though in past years France and Scotland have been friendly and wanted the best for each other, Scottish independence is not on the list of things to do for France.  They have good blood together, sharing foods, music and alcohol at festivals there is no need to worry about any hatred happening even if the French does not back Scotland's independence.  While some think that France would think that areas like Brittany and Corsica would want independence from France that is not the reason.  To keep checks and balances in place a strong United Kingdom is needed to keep Germany in line.  With the independence of Scotland, the UK gets a little bit weaker and France is not okay with that.

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Flag wars

Flag wars | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Mr Füzes had voiced support for the Székler people, a group of ethnic Hungarians who live in Transylvania, after two Romanian counties banned the display of the Székler flag (pictured above with men in hussar uniform) on public buildings. Zsolt Nemeth, Hungary’s state secretary for foreign affairs, described the ban as an act of “symbolic aggression” and called for local councils in Hungary to show solidarity by flying the Székler flag from town halls. The Hungarian government then raised the Székler flag above Parliament, further enraging Bucharest..."


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Conor McCloskey's comment, April 30, 2013 10:26 AM
The past is the past. Or is it? The past seems to mean more to the people of Hungary and Romania these days. The Treaty of Trianon of 1920 sectioned the region of Transylvania from Romania to Hungary. For the ethnic Hungarians living in Transylvania, this posed quite the issue. For many people around the world, the homeland does not always match up with geopolitical boundaries of the country that they live in. While this identity crisis causes conflict for many groups of people all over the world, in Hungary the fight to regain greater-Hungary continues today.
This article also poses interesting questions of voting and citizenship. The Hungarian government granted citizenship beyond its borders, and jurisdiction, to ethnic Hungarians in Romania. What does this say about those Hungarians in Romania? Does it bring Hungary any closer to regaining the borders of the once Greater Hungary? Regardless of the questions of citizenship, such public and federal efforts to expand their borders and regain their ethnic population and homeland is doing more then turning heads. Look to this region for future conflict because the failure of geopolitical nations to represent ethnic homelands rarely ends peacefully.
John Peterson's comment, April 30, 2013 10:37 AM
This article helps to illustrate tensions that can be caused by seemingly simple acts within a society that is home to two conflicting groups. While flags do not have any actual influence or power in society, they are a source of emotion, and pride in ones nation and heritage. Because of the emotion that is tied with flags, it can be a very tense situation when the use of these flags is banned, or if these flags are taken down or destroyed. It is amazing how something so simple as a flag can bring about so much anger, and be the source of such bad blood and violence between different nations or ethnic groups. In the example given, there has been conflict for years, which was recently fueled even more over the use of a flag. While the act of displaying a flag is simply a display of loyalty, the actions of the Romanian government against this practice shows how although it is not a violent act, it can lead to very hostile actions and interactions.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 4:12 PM
This article got me thinking. The tensions between Hungary and Romania seem trivial to me. The Romanians are the right ones in my opinion and the act of displaying the Székler flag about the Hungarian Parliament was plainly a theoretical middle finger to Romania. The more than a million Hungarians living in present day Romania relates to our unit on culture and nations/states. There is a Hungarian nation of people in Romania that the Hungarian government has now granted rights to, again purposely antagonizing Romania, and Romania is rightfully concerned of their dual-loyalty. Overall, the situation is taken way out of proportion by Hungary and what former piece of an empire wants that flag flown in their country. In Ireland do you see the Union Jack… that’d be a no.