Fashion in Public Relations
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Ukrainian Designers Press On in Wartime

Ukrainian Designers Press On in Wartime | Fashion in Public Relations | Scoop.it
As Ukraine remained in crisis, Kiev’s fashion week hit the runways.
Kelsie D. Brough's insight:

As we all should be well aware of, Ukraine has been in turmoil for some time now. During Kiev’s fashion week, Ukraine remained in crisis, with a cease-fire weakening. Ukrainians in Kiev tried their hardest to continue with business. The designers had quite a hard time continuing with sewing machines that would only run for maybe two hours a day because of electricity shortages, problems with importing fabric, and fears from business contacts outside of the country. At Paris’s fashion week back in September, many Ukrainian designers had a new showroom with a slogan: “Fashion for Peace.” Omelya, a Ukrainian label, had T-shirts printed in English with the word “Relax” on it, hoping to sell them to European retailers. Ksenia Schnaider, a Ukrainian designer, had a Ukrainian symbol embroidered on clothes such as sweatshirts. Also, Lera Leschova showed apparel “inspired by the Ukrainian national costume in the western parts of the country, with painted florals.” International fashion is always at high risk for problems. Whether it is importation issues or anything. Many were impressed at how well Kiev and the Ukrainian’s handled this crisis. Ms. Gilhart, the fashion retail consultant, said while she was in Paris she was moved to see that the designers were making collections “at a time when their whole country was in total chaos.”

 

I think this ties in well with the Image Restoration Theory very well. I am in a sorority, and I am always told that I am representing the organization as whole with every action. I think these designers represented their country as a whole with their actions as well. They took a very serious crisis, and turned it into a movement of peace and loyalty to their country.  In our reading from way back in week three, talks about corrective action. While these designers did not exactly correct the problems their country is having, they may have helped some of the misunderstandings many people around the world may have about Ukrainians as a whole. Corrective action “involves the accused individual promising to fix the problem.” Ukrainian designers did this with their “Relax” T-shirts and their “Fashion for Peace” slogan. Also, the two designers I mentioned above used this with displaying subtle hints of loyalty and patriotism to their country in their clothing with the traditional florals and symbols on their designs. In my opinion, this was a great idea. It definitely gained them attention, and I’m sure they had quite a few buyers wanting their collections and designs in their stores. 

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Marc Jacobs to Cast Fall 2014 Ad Campaign Star Via Social Media

Marc Jacobs to Cast Fall 2014 Ad Campaign Star Via Social Media | Fashion in Public Relations | Scoop.it
So you want to be a model? Well, we have good news for you. Marc Jacobs is currently looking for a new face for his contemporary label, and all you have to do in order to be considered is post a picture of yourself to Instagram or Twitter.
Kelsie D. Brough's insight:

In April of 2014, Marc Jacobs took to social media (Twitter) to announce his casting call for his fall 2014 collection. He used the hashtag, #CastMeMarc.  The casting call encouraged women to submit their best photos of themselves in hopes of becoming the fall 2014 face of Marc Jacobs. Marc Jacobs posted the contest on Wednesday night, and this article was written on Thursday and already numerous people from all over the world had already submitted their photos.

 

The article goes on to say that this is not Marc Jacob’s first social media campaign. In January of 2013, he announced that Miley Cyrus would be the star of his spring 2014 advertising campaign.  As one can imagine, the announcement brought up some controversy and shock via social media.

 

Just last week in class we discussed different companies’ social media presence, especially their presence on Twitter. Since Marc Jacobs used Twitter to announce his campaign and casting call, I thought the two readings fit pretty well. The first reading about Red Cross was sort of a crisis communication, but it helped show the personality of their brand. Also, they jumped on the Sharknado hashtag bandwagon with fun facts about keeping safe during a Tornado. It really helped their social media presence. In my opinion, what Marc Jacobs did only helped his presence on social media as well.

 

Taco Bell is another company that has been extremely present on all types of social media. They have Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, and many others. The article states, “Taco Bell cleverly repurposes a lot of user generated content on its own channels, which deepens the engagement with its followers and they actively utilize fans to help promote the brand.” While I agree that Taco Bell did a great job at this, Marc Jacobs did as well. Without realizing it, those who were using the hashtag #CastMeMarc were promoting his brand while trying to win the contest and become the face of Marc Jacobs. It was a brilliant plan, in my opinion. The campaign shows a softer side to Marc Jacobs. Instead of hiring a well-known model to be the face of his campaign, such as Kylie Jenner, he wants to hire some girl who might not have any modeling experience at all. This girl has the opportunity to make herself a model and possibly a successful one. This campaign made Marc Jacobs even more recognized than he already is.

 

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24-Hour Window Shopping: Kate Spade Launches New ‘Saturday’ Collection | PR Examples

24-Hour Window Shopping: Kate Spade Launches New ‘Saturday’ Collection | PR Examples | Fashion in Public Relations | Scoop.it
Kelsie D. Brough's insight:

In June of 2013, Kate Spade Saturday has collaborated with EBay to launch a touch screen window shops at four locations across New York City. According to the article, shoppers can browse through the 30-piece collection then make a purchase via PayPal on the giant touch-screen window at any time of the day or night. I think this is absolutely brilliant! After picking the items that they want, shoppers will receive a text message to their phone asking where and when they want their items delivered. It can be delivered to them in as quickly as an hour! This is every online shopper’s dream.

 

According to the senior Vice President of Marketing at the fashion brand, Kate Spade Saturday is the ‘younger, cooler, sister’ of its brand Kate Spade New York. He says that he really cannot think of a better way to introduce Kate Spade Saturday to the world than this. It is combining the high street with an “innovative e-commerce function.”  Since everything is online these days, it is what many retailers need to do to stay alive offline – be creative! That is just what Kate Spade and EBay did.

 

The Cumulative Effects Theory states that persuasive campaigns can be most effective when the message comes from a variety of sources and/or is repeated from the same source over an extended period of time. I think this theory ties into this because it is both Kate Spade Saturday, Kate Spade New York, and EBay all coming together in this campaign. Therefore, we are getting the “message” to buy the products from three different outlets.

 

Another theory that I think ties into this campaign very well is the Diffusion Theory. According to an article we had back in week 2, “This theory explains the five steps that individuals go through in adopting new ideas or products: awareness, interest, trial, evaluation, and adoption.” Kate Spade Saturday and EBay’s idea is innovative, and was successful as a launch. They made their audiences aware, interested, tried it out, evaluated their success and decided whether to adopt it or not.

 

As someone who owns products from Kate Spade New York already, I think this was a great way to launch the Kate Spade Saturday line. Looking at it from their audience perspective, because my generation would be their audience, I think it really worked. If I were to be walking down the streets of New York, I would definitely stop to “window shop.”

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Miley Cyrus Debuted Her Candy-Raver Jewelry Today

Miley Cyrus Debuted Her Candy-Raver Jewelry Today | Fashion in Public Relations | Scoop.it
At the wild Jeremy Scott show.
Kelsie D. Brough's insight:

                I thought this was a great article to touch on because we just talked about the Miley Cyrus chaos in class on Tuesday. Recently, she has broken out into the fashion industry with her new, hand-made jewelry. On September 10, 2014, it was “anticipated” that she would be displaying “art” at New York Fashion Week in Jeremy Scott’s show. Scott’s shows are always full of “crazy.” The article states that he specializes in it. He always has unexpected celebrities in them. Last year he had Jared Leto, Joe Jonas, and Nicki Minaj. This year he had 2 Chainz and Whoopi Goldberg.

                To much of the attendees’ surprise, Miley’s “art” ended up being “hand-crafted, Technicolor beaded jewelry.” There were troll dolls on necklaces and earrings made out of candy that went all the way down to a model’s waist. The article says that, “The whole thing matched perfectly with Scott’s collection, which he described as ‘very DIY’ and inspired by ‘music festivals’ and ‘beach bonfires.’” Scott was asked how Miley’s jewelry came to his mind. He stated that he was at her house for a party, saw the jewelry, and knew it had to be in his show.

                This article goes along perfectly with our readings about Miley Cyrus on Tuesday. It shows, once again, that she is a public relations genius and that she always knows how to keep herself in the limelight. In Waymer, VanSlette, and Cherry’s case study, they have a section called “Brand Identification,” and it covers how celebrities want their “brand” to be seen.  Miley clearly has changed hers throughout the years. Over the years, she has completely changed her fan base from very young girls to people around her same age or older. She has sort of a bad reputation for this because she was a child star from Disney Channel. The case study argues that Miley was in a very difficult PR effort, which I would agree with. The article goes on to say that her actual transformation from Hannah Montana, Disney star, to the Miley Cyrus she is now took quite a while. Because she was seen as Billy Ray Cyrus’s “little girl” and this innocent, brown-haired girl from the Disney Channel, she had to be very careful as to how she went about “rebranding” herself. She continued to rebrand herself with her haircut and her signature “tongue out” pose. She has been very successful in doing so. 

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Another Luxury Store Gets Sued For Racial Discrimination

Another Luxury Store Gets Sued For Racial Discrimination | Fashion in Public Relations | Scoop.it
"Burrito face," "Goya princess" and "taco smoke” are just a few of the offensive and racist names that a former Alexander McQueen store employee is claiming her boss called her while on the job.

According to the New...
Kelsie D. Brough's insight:

 

This article in particular focuses on crisis communication. In a nutshell:  Alexander McQueen has allegedly mistreated and been discriminatory to two of their former employees. Moselle Blanco, a 43-year-old Hispanic woman is filing a lawsuit against Alexander McQueen’s trendy, upscale New York boutique.  The civil suit says that Blanco’s boss, Max Cantey, called her a multitude of racist names but also subjected her “to a persistent barrage of offensive comments based on her race and national origin.” Blanco says that Cantey told her “she had greasy hands like a Mexican and that he did not want any product to ‘get messy.’” She also states that she was accused of stealing products and using cocaine at work, which is a false accusation.

 

Another instance, Othman Ibela, an African-born security guard filed a lawsuit against them in July. He claimed he was talked to with racial slurs and taunted by many sales clerks. He claims that his hostile work environment lead him to depression and anxiety attacks that had him hospitalized. Ibela also says that black customers were watched closely and racially profiled.

 

Alexander McQueen used a number of tactics in their statements to the press during this time. In the statement that the article has, they say, “Alexander McQueen is committed to equality in the workplace, and we are proud of our diverse employee base. We take any allegations of this nature seriously and will always investigate them thoroughly, but we will not comment on individual cases.” By saying that they are proud of their diversity in the workplace, they are denying it. Also, by using that same statement, they are using Bolstering by stressing the good traits the company has, such as being proud of their diverse culture.

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Digital marketing case study - Case study: Burberry teams with Google to offer social media ‘kisses’ - Digital Training Academy

Case study: Burberry teams with Google to offer social media ‘kisses’ - Digital marketing case study from the Digital Training Academy - Following its successful ‘Art of the Trench' campaign, luxury fashion brand Burberry has teamed up with Google to let people capture their kisses by direct contact with their touch screen device, adding a personalised message and send on to friends across the globe. The YouTube video below has already notched up half a million views three months after the campaign went live.



Brand: Burberry | Sector: Clothing, Luxury | Country: Global | Agency/Partner: Grow, oogle | Objective: brand awareness, consideration and purchase | Format: Social, Mobile
Kelsie D. Brough's insight:

In 2013, Burberry teamed up with Google for their newest public relations campaign, Kisses.Burberry.com. This website lets Google Chrome and mobile users share “kisses” by using their desktop camera or touchscreen phone camera. The kicker is that the users can personalize their “kiss” by choosing a shade of Burberry Beauty lip color. Google Earth and Streetview come into play by bringing the kiss to life by watching it travel through the internet. Burberry’s Chief Creative Officer, Christopher Bailey, says, “The experience is designed to give technology a little heart and soul.” This is also a part of Google’s Art, Copy, & Code project, which is a series of storytelling collaborations between Google and multiple brands.

The article explains that the campaign “built a connection to the Burberry brand without feeling like a traditional ad.” The campaign had a large number of results: 253,000 Google searches for “Burberry Kisses” within the first 10 days of the campaign. Also, 13,000 cities sent a kiss and 109 million miles were traveled by kisses as of June 25, 2013. By teaming up with Google, Burberry reached quite a few people, and in my opinion the campaign was very successful. 253,000 searches may not sound like a lot, but Burberry is an expensive, exclusive brand.

I tie this article and campaign back to AT&T’s It Can Wait campaign because of how successful both campaigns were because of the companies they teamed up with. As we read last week, AT&T teamed up with over 200 organizations including competitors such as Verizon, Sprint and T-Mobile. Instead of making it a competition, the companies worked together to get the message across to drivers. President of Verizon Wireless said, “The It Can Wait campaign is a meaningful way for Verizon to continue its work on this important issue.” No competition there.

Along with competitive companies, AT&T teamed up with many media channels such as Clear Channel Media and Entertainment to be able to have their message shared. Also, they teamed up with University of Illinois’ 4H club to reach a wider group of drivers. These two articles tie together because of their strategic choices on which companies to team up with. Burberry needed Google’s expertise in touch screen technology, location services, Google Maps and other forms of technology for their campaign to be successful. While AT&T needed a wider out reach of people for their campaign to also be successful.

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A Wake-Up Call for YSL's PR Team - The Business of Fashion

A Wake-Up Call for YSL's PR Team - The Business of Fashion | Fashion in Public Relations | Scoop.it
PARIS, France — A few weeks ago, Yves Saint Laurent’s PR team wrote to BoF, asking that we edit a tweet. We had shared one of the striking new Saint Laurent campaign images with our followers, referring to the campaign as ‘Saint Laurent Paris.’ Brands often write to thank us for sharing their advertising campaigns with our community, but this was the first time that a brand had written asking us to rewrite a tweet. What was the problem? “Paris is only used in the logo and not for the RTW name, that being just ‘Saint Laurent,’” the PR wrote, referring to a … More
Kelsie D. Brough's insight:

Yves Saint Laurent’s public relation’s team wrote to Business of Fashion asking them to edit a tweet that they had posted. BoF had shared a new Saint Laurent campaign image, referring to the campaign as ‘Saint Laurent Paris.’ The PR team wrote, “Paris is only used in the logo and not for the RTW name, that being just ‘Saint Laurent.’” BoF simply deleted the tweet and edited a “corresponding Tumblr post displaying the campaign image in question.”

 

A couple of weeks later, Saint Laurent’s public relations team sent out a mass email instructing media on the “nomenclature” they should use when referring to their brand. In the email they said the House is referred to “Yves Saint Laurent” and the collection by Hedi Slimane is referred to as “Saint Laurent.” “Saint Laurent Paris” is used only in the logo. They followed up with another email saying the previous email was “not for official use or for lifting quotes.”

 

In a feature on YSL’s new “retrobranding,” BoF explained the details and the thoughts behind the operation. Once again, YSL sent BoF an email asking them to revise their piece without specifically stating the mistakes. After BoF sent a follow up email asking what they wanted changed, an email in return was never received.

 

BoF wrote this article to clear their name from YSL. BoF did not get invited to their fashion show, and apparently this is a “norm” for YSL to do to media who do not print what they want them to.

 

I tied this back to our reading in Week 9 “4 Ways media relations is like ‘The Hunger Games.’” Instead of using the article as a “how to” I used it as a “what not to do.” The second point the article makes is to make alliances. In my opinion, Yves Saint Laurent’s public relations team did the exact opposite. They made themselves an enemy. Media outlets read other media outlets articles and listen to other news to find out what is happening at the moment and what other medias are having to say about it. This is where the agenda setting theory comes in.

 

After reading this article, I am not a fan of Yves Saint Laurent. I have honestly never seen any of their work, but from what I can read, it does not look like they really care about their image. This article was written in 2012, and they were not ready to accept that digital media is changing, and BoF stood up for themselves.

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DKNY’s Quick Facebook Crisis Response: PR Win? - PRNewser

DKNY’s Quick Facebook Crisis Response: PR Win? - PRNewser | Fashion in Public Relations | Scoop.it
DKNY’s Quick Facebook Crisis Response: PR Win?
Kelsie D. Brough's insight:

Brandon Stanton is a photographer in New York who runs the “Humans of New York” page, where he posts images of everyday New Yorkers and their “New York” outfits to more than 500,000 followers. DKNY approached him with a $15,000 offer for 300 photos to use in their store windows around the world. Stanton declined the $15,000 and asked for more, and DKNY declined his counter-offer. DKNY decided to go ahead with the idea. A fan of Stanton’s sent him a photo of a display at a DKNY in Bangkok with his images used “without his knowledge, and without compensation.”

 

Instead of suing DKNY, Stanton said he wanted DKNY to donate $100,000 on his behalf to the YMCA in Bedford-Stuyvestant, Brooklyn. His post got more than 38,000 likes and 37,000 shares. DKNY responded in only hours saying that the DKNY store in Bangkok used an “internal mock up containing some of Mr. Stanton’s images that was intended to merely show the direction of the spring visual program.” They went on to apologize and say that they are working on the problem and making sure that only the approved work is used from now on. Also, they agreed to make a donation of $25,000 to the YMCA in behalf of Stanton’s name. Stanton agreed with the $25,000 and was thankful the end result was a happy one.

 

Looking at this from a crisis communication standpoint, I think that DKNY used evasion of responsibility because they did not take full responsibility for their actions, although they did apologize. They merely said that the display was used to share their ideas for the spring visual program. Also, they used corrective action by saying they are working towards not letting this mistake happen again. Also, they used Compensation and went along with Mr. Stanton’s wishes and granted the YMCA a donation in his name, although they did not give the full amount that he originally asked for. Bolstering was also a tactic used in their statement: “DKNY has always supported the arts and we deeply regret this mistake.” By saying that they support the arts, they are saying they fully support Mr. Stanton and his work.

 

At the end of the article, it says that the publisher has mixed feelings about DKNY’s response, and I would have to agree. $25,000 is a good monetary donation to compensate for their “mistake,” but is it enough to clear their name?

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Retailers Use Twitter Lists in Influencer Marketing Efforts

Retailers Use Twitter Lists in Influencer Marketing Efforts | Fashion in Public Relations | Scoop.it

On Tuesday, GAP tweeted: “Blogged about @Gap lately? Let us know with the hashtag #GapFashion so we can you to our influencer list.” The tweet included a link to a Twitter list of “Fashion Influencers” created by the brand. Of course, the list is probably just the tip of the iceberg of GAP’s influencer marketing effort, but should we be surprised when a brand shares lists of bloggers publicly?
In this case, no. GAP’s list organizes bloggers that write about the brand (info readily available via search), and it makes curating future content from those same bloggers very easy. Behind the scenes, it likely helps the brand identify candidates that warrant cultivation of deeper relationships.
Since private lists would serve the same functions, what’s the motive for making them public? One word: flattery. What GAP-loving fashion blogger wouldn’t want to be on GAP’s list of Fashion Influencers?


Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
Kelsie D. Brough's insight:

                As we have all been told in all of our public relations classes, blogging and your online image is very important as public relations professionals. To be completely honest, I have always thought it was sort of a hoax. I did not think that the older generations of public relations professionals are using blogging to brand themselves or their organization that they work for, but I have been proven wrong. Even the fashion industry is breaking into blogging.

                This article explains how Gap is using Twitter to promote blogging. They sent out a tweet saying, “Blogged about @Gap lately? Let us know with the hashtag #GapFashion so we can add you to our influencer list.” The tweet also included a link to a Twitter list of “Fashion Influencers” that Gap created.

                In a way, Gap is using the Agenda Setting Theory from our first reading. They are setting the agenda via their social media account, Twitter, as to what bloggers should be writing about in their blogs to be able to get on Gap’s “Fashion Influencers” list. In my opinion, it was a very good public relations move. Gap has always been known as a respectable brand name, and now this will get even more people talking about them via different social media outlets. Also, if you keep in mind that some of those blogs can get re-blogged or even published.

                Gap, however, is not the only fashion brand using this technique. It has become a tradition among many other fashion brands. Rue La La has two lists called “Style bloggers” and “Design bloggers,” distinguishing between people who want to blog about Rue La La’s style and Rue La La’s designers. Barnes & Noble has “Authors,” Book People,” and “Publishers.” TJ Maxx has “Fashion Bloggers,” “Budget Bloggers,” and “Lifestyle Bloggers.” JC Penney’s also has two called “Influencers” and “Fashion Bloggers.” It seems that Gap not only set the agenda for the social media trend and topic, but they also set the trend for other stores as well. Barnes and Noble and Michaels are not “fashion” stores, and they are even following in Gap’s footsteps. 

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Fashion in the Age of Instagram

Fashion in the Age of Instagram | Fashion in Public Relations | Scoop.it

 The photo-sharing app has changed the way fashion is made, seen and shared.

Kelsie D. Brough's insight:

Instagram and other photo sharing websites and applications have changed the ways companies and organizations market themselves and their products. By allowing companies and organizations to share multiple photos at a time, personalize it, and write a caption, Instagram has really changed the game of Public Relations for many fashion designers. In this article, Keith Baptista, the managing partner of Prodject, says, “In some sense, every single person in the audience is their own media outlet. They’re all capturing these moments in this life experience to tell their stories.”

 

In a reading from week two, “Applying Theory to Public Relations Campaigns,” there is a section called “Press Agentry and Publicity” that I think applies to this article very well.  The reading states, “This model is practiced by professionals who use mainly one-way communication to promote products, services, and events with little measure of the results.”  I would say this is very true with public relations and the fashion industry these days. Little measurement is done to see how well their practices are working because people are only going to buy their high-end fashion items if they are able to afford them.

 

Tiziana Cardini, the fashion director of the Milanese department store chain La Rinascente and a contributing editor at Italian Vogue, has noticed a huge change that public relations and the Instagram media is to “blame” for. She says, “Fashion has become bi-dimensional. It’s just flat. I see that designers, especially young designers, are considering the shapes and volumes in a total different way; the colors, also. I think they pay much more attention to the photogenic value of an outfit.”

 

I think this article shows how different forms of social media are being used now-a-days to promote products. Personally, I follow Michael Kors, Christian Louboutin, and a few other high fashion designers on Instagram and they are constantly posting pictures and videos of their newest products and campaigns. This week is New York Fashion Week, and they have taken to Snapchat to promote different designers, which I thought was very interesting. 

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