Rules that keep us Safe, Respectful and Responsible- Family, School and Community Rules and Their Purposes (Stage 1)
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Indij Readers- "Fat Head" by Liam Lawson, Naomi Carr and Ros Thorpe

Indij Readers- "Fat Head" by Liam Lawson, Naomi Carr and Ros Thorpe | Rules that keep us Safe, Respectful and Responsible- Family, School and Community Rules and Their Purposes (Stage 1) | Scoop.it
Grace Ludemann's insight:

One reason why families have rules is to help share responsibilities and work load. By doing jobs around the house, we keep our families safe, healthy and happy.

This Indij Reader for Little Fullas is called 'Fat Head' and is a simple, fun story about an Aboriginal boy, Liam, and his pet bird, Fat Head. The text explores different chores that Liam must finish to look after Fat Head, including feeding, cleaning his cage and taking him out for exercise. These chores are easy for students to identify and understand, and this text helps to highlight the similarities between people from different cultures. 

After reading 'Big Head', students could examine their own roles and responsibilities in their home. This text can be applied to multiple KLAs. In English, the students could read the text and write a simple procedure to direct how to look after your pet. In Maths, students could make a class graph about the different types of pets students own. In Science, students could look at the physical needs of different animals, such as food, clean shelter and exercise. These applications all further explore the purpose of family rules in taking responsibility for chores around the house.

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Lessons from the Past

Lessons from the Past | Rules that keep us Safe, Respectful and Responsible- Family, School and Community Rules and Their Purposes (Stage 1) | Scoop.it
Integrating outcomes from HSIE, PDHPE and Creative Arts, this program gives students the opportunity to learn first hand about what school life was like in the late 19th century.
Grace Ludemann's insight:

Introducing young students to an historical perspective is an effective way to introduce enquiry based approaches in an accessible way. By experiencing history, students are able to ask questions, make comparisons and offer judgements which are fundamental parts of enquiry. Within the study of a historical perspective, the use of simulations and games can help students to ‘learn from within’ as they adopt the characters of historical experiences and can actively engage in the experience themselves (Turner-Bisset, 2005).
In Stage 1, such simulations should be approached with lots of scaffolding. Many historic houses and museums in Sydney run interactive programs that allow students to immerse themselves in a particular time period. Such a program includes visiting Rouse Hill House and Farm to take part in the 'Lessons from the Past' program. In this excursion, students spend a day in the life of a school student in the 1800s. They participate in traditional school lessons and must abide by traditional school rules. Through costume, role-play and presentations from historians, students learn differences between our modern classroom and the classroom of the past. Students should then be led to discuss some different rules they experienced on the excursion, e.g. saluting the flag and singing the national anthem every morning to compare with school rules today. Students should then be able to form a basic evaluation on which rules they think are better and why.
 

Turner-Bisset, R. (2005) Simulations and games. In Turner- Bisset, R. (Ed.) Creative teaching: History in the primary classroom (pp 112-122). London: David Fulton

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ClassDojo

ClassDojo | Rules that keep us Safe, Respectful and Responsible- Family, School and Community Rules and Their Purposes (Stage 1) | Scoop.it
Grace Ludemann's insight:

In my professional experience, I have seen teachers use the Dojo Point system to support student behaviour and encourage adherance to a classroom policy or set of rules. I have seen it used best to reinforce positive behaviours rather than negative behaviours. 

One of the better features of the Dojo system is the ability to customise rules and behaviours in the system that reflect your individual class policy. This sets the stage for teachers and their students to work together to jointly and democratically construct a list of suitable classroom rules. By working together to create rules, students have a greater understanding of the purpose of rules and responsibilities, which, besides creating a sense of classroom ownership, is an effect classroom management strategy (Hendley, 2007). Students learn that rules exist to keep them safe, foster respect and promote responsibility. This collaborative rule-writing is also a recommend strategy to manage prejudice in Stage 1 from Racism No Way (http://www.prejudicenoway.com/year1/4.4.html).  

The Dojo system also has a feature which enables teachers to send behaviour reports directly to parents. In some circumstances, where parents are willing to participate in their children’s scholastic behaviour management, this could be an effective tie-in to exploring rules students have at home. However, as Kelley and Jurbergs explain, there are many factors in students’ lives which negate these benefits such as behavioural disorders, mental health issues and parental apathy. Reinforcement of positive behaviours is much more effective way to manage the classroom.

 

Hendley, S. L. (2007) Use positive behaviour support for inclusion in the general education classroom. Intervention in School and Clinic, 42, 225-228

 

Kelley, M. L., Jurbergs, N. (2009) Daily report cards: Home-based consequences for classroom behavior. In Akin Little, A., Little, S. G., Bray, M. A., Kehle, T. J. (Eds) Behavioral interventions in schools: Evidence-based positive strategies (pp 221-230). Washington, USA: American Psychological Association.

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Families of the World

Families of the World | Rules that keep us Safe, Respectful and Responsible- Family, School and Community Rules and Their Purposes (Stage 1) | Scoop.it
Grace Ludemann's insight:

Families of the World is a collection of video and text-based resources that explore the different customs and traditions of families from around the world. On this website, there are free 'preview videos' that show short insights into the family routines, education and relationships of families from many cultures including Vietnam, India, Afghanistan, Thailand and Egypt. The videos are narrated by American children, including when depicting English speaking cultures, which does take away from the authenticity of the cultural representation. However, the video footage is very good and clearly explores the roles of children in the families and what they are expected to do to contribute to family life- whether that be studying hard or feeding livestock. 

This resource is a good way to include a global perspective, and also to represent the many different cultures found in metropolitan Sydney classrooms in HSIE. 
After viewing this text, students should be led to cooperatively construct a comparative list of some of their own responsibilities and the responsibilities of other children from across the world. 

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Police Officer Classroom Visit

Grace Ludemann's insight:

Young children can be very vulnerable members of the community, so teaching students about basic community rules is an important part of our duty of care as teachers.
An engaging way of helping students to learn how to take care of themselves and other when out in the community is to have a classroom visit from a local police officer. The NSW Police Force has created the ‘SchoolSafe Program’, an educational program designed to inform school students about how to be safe in the community and on the road. The program includes an activity book and teacher resources, which are linked in this Scoop, however these should be used in conjunction with a visit from a member of the local police station. A visit includes an engaging presentation from 'Constable Charlie', a giant penguin ‘police officer’, and human police officers from the Local Area Command about rules that keep up us safe, including pedestrian safety and stranger-danger. 
Such a presentation helps students to understand and apply community rules to protect themselves and their friends. The police visit can be used in other KLAS to reinforce this message. In the Creative Arts, students could complete a role-play activity that consolidates what they should do in dangerous situations. In English, students could collaboratively construct a list of safety precautions to be displayed around the school. In PDHPE students could discuss what safety is and how they feel when they are safe.

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