Fahrenheit Frenzy
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Fahrenheit Frenzy
Articles that are similar in theme to the novel Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
Curated by Carly Gibbons
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Censorship In The Media

The article "SOPA/ PIRA Take a Beating From Activist Groups and You" by Dean Danrahan, describes how the government is trying to prevent media coverage of the public outcry against SOPA and PIRA. However, they have become stories too large to be able to avoid media coverage. People have been bombarding their local senators, as well as Washington with phonecalls expressing their opposition about legislation that would allow the government to place bans on what internet viewers can see and also shut down websites. Very recently, the movement to stop SOPA made it on the public television for the first time on the Colbert Report. The media coverage is in direct correlation to the amount of public unrest the SOPA and PIRA movements have caused, making many of us revolutionaries. This is very similar to the theme of Censorship in "Fahrenheit 451," because in the novel there is a band of people who have memorized parts of different novels to ensure that they will never be forgotten. Although it could cause them their life, these people took steps to counteract the government's "Book Ban" and hold hope for a brighter future. The people speaking out against SOPA are very similar to that band on people in the novel, because they are unwilling to see the government take over our right to free expression on the internet, without putting up a fair fight first. 

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Censorship In Your "Smart Phones"

The article "Censorship: 2011 in Review - Search Incident to Arrest and Your Cell Phone" by Hanni Fakhoury discusses how censorship is rearing its ugly head in the sudden boom of the use of smart phones. Now that 40% of mobile phone users use smart phones, they are not only carrying a device that allows them to simply dial and make phone calls, they are carrying a portal to their emails, text messages, billing and credit card information, social networking access, internet history, etc,. The issue at hand is that it is being debated whether or not the authorities should have the right to unwarrantedly search your mobile devices. This is similar to the themes of "Fahrenheit 451," because the authorities of this novel performed searches and seizures of local homes and people who did not always necassarily have grounds under them to believe that they were breaking the "No Books" rule. Through a series of court cases, the issue on whether or not police can perform unwarrented searches is at a stand still representing two contrasted opinions. The allowance of unwarranted cell phone searches appears to be in direct violation of the fourth ammendment, however it is an idea continuing to be upheld in court. Clearly, unwarranted cell phone seizures by police would lead to the discovery of information in probably nearly every person's cell phone that could get them into some sort of trouble. Just as the discovery of books in several people's houses in "Fahrenheit 451" completely altered and nearly destroyed their lives, the implimentation of this law in America could do just the same. 

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Censorship On The Internet

In the article "American Censorship Day Makes Online Statement: The Ticker" by Kirsten Salyer, the author describes how on November 16th, websites such as Tumblr, Mozilla, Reddit, Techdirt, etc., marked their posts with a "Censored" stamp. These sites participated in a so called "American Censorship Day" that protested the Stop Online Piracy Act, a measure in which the government would have new powers to crack down on fraudulent websites. Google, Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, and Twitter teamed up to oppose the measure. This is similar to the themes of censorship in "Fahrenheit 451," because, very similar to the internet and its resources, books are way of free expression. Giving the government the power to shut down websites is in direct violation to our right to free speech, just as the power to forbid everyone from reading or writing books is also a violation of that very right. The Stop Online Piracy act also pits the U.S. film and music industries, which want the government to protect their property against top Internet companies, who say the bill threatens the technology industry by limiting innovation. This is also very similar to "Fahrenheit 451," because the ban on books limited innovation by keeping people in a state of believing that burning classic novels and works was actually furthering their progress. However, in reality, if the people in the novel did not believe that, they would have moved much farther up in society and made the world within the novel a better functioning place. We need the internet to further our progress here in America, and putting severe censorship and limitations on what we can view, will also put severe limitations on the broadening of our knowledge and our progress. 

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