Facial expressions
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Darwin's Claim of Universals in Facial Expression Not Challenged - Huffington Post (blog)

Darwin's Claim of Universals in Facial Expression Not Challenged - Huffington Post (blog) | Facial expressions | Scoop.it
Darwin's Claim of Universals in Facial Expression Not Challenged
Huffington Post (blog)
Lisa Feldman Barrett's Feb. 28 New York Times op-ed seeks to undermine the science showing universality in the interpretation of facial expressions.
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Young Bonobos, Human Children Have Similar Emotional Responses - Science News

Young Bonobos, Human Children Have Similar Emotional Responses - Science News | Facial expressions | Scoop.it
Striking similarities between the emotional development of bonobos and that of human children have been discovered by researchers studying young bonobos in an African sanctuary.

 

As genetically similar to humans as the chimpanzee is, the bonobo is one of our closest primate relatives. Research supports the idea that the bonobo is the most empathic of the great apes. “This makes the species an ideal candidate for psychological comparisons,” says de Waal. “Any fundamental similarity between humans and bonobos probably traces back to their last common ancestor, which lived around six million years ago...

 

“By measuring the expression of distress and arousal in great apes, and how they cope, we were able to confirm that efficient emotion regulation is an essential part of empathy. Empathy allows great apes and humans to absorb the distress of others without getting overly distressed themselves,” continues de Waal. This might explain why the traumatized orphan bonobos are less socially competent than their mother-raised peers....


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Brain research shows psychopathic criminals do not lack empathy, but fail to use it automatically

Brain research shows psychopathic criminals do not lack empathy, but fail to use it automatically | Facial expressions | Scoop.it
A brain imaging study in the Netherlands shows individuals with psychopathy have reduced empathy while witnessing the pains of others. When asked to empathize, however, they can activate their empathy.

 

 Criminal psychopathy can be both repulsive and fascinating, as illustrated by the vast number of books and movies inspired by this topic. Offenders diagnosed with psychopathy pose a significant threat to society, because they are more likely to harm other individuals and to do so again after being released. A brain imaging study in the Netherlands shows individuals with psychopathy have reduced empathy while witnessing the pains of others. When asked to empathize, however, they can activate their empathy. This could explain why psychopathic individuals can be callous and socially cunning at the same time. Why are psychopathic individuals more likely to hurt others? 


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Fearful Expressions May Have Functional Benefits | Psych Central ...

Fearful Expressions May Have Functional Benefits | Psych Central ... | Facial expressions | Scoop.it
New research suggests there may be a reason for the wide-eyed expression that often accompanies the perception of a fearful event. Researchers believe the.
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Fundamental facial expressions: are there really 21? | The Why Files

Fundamental facial expressions: are there really 21? | The Why Files | Facial expressions | Scoop.it
For centuries, psychologists have studied six basic facial expressions: happy, angry, sad, surprised, fearful and disgusted. But as cognitive scientist Aleix Martinez of the Ohio State University studied those six, a heretical ...
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Manipulative and empathetic people both adept at reading emotions - U of M News Service

Manipulative and empathetic people both adept at reading emotions - U of M News Service | Facial expressions | Scoop.it
Manipulative and empathetic people both adept at reading emotions U of M News Service Although good emotion-recognition skills might seem like concern and empathy, some people might use these skills to manipulate others, new University of Michigan...
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Reading fiction boosts empathy, reduces discomfort with uncertainty

Reading fiction boosts empathy, reduces discomfort with uncertainty | Facial expressions | Scoop.it

Reading literary fiction — even something as short as 10 pages — can increase empathy, improve decision-making and make people more comfortable with uncertainty, suggest two new Canadian studies. In other words, the very pursuit we use to distract us from real life might actually make us better at living it.

 

Lead author Maja Djikic said the findings have particular repercussions for our schools, where she notes a “dangerous trend” away from the arts and soft skills. This observation dovetails with a January report from Scholastic showing that reading for pleasure on a regular basis (five to seven days a week) is indeed a waning activity among youths, having fallen to 34 per cent in 2012 from 37 per cent two years earlier.


BY MISTY HARRIS, 

 

Reading Other Minds: Effects of Literature on Empathy; Djikic, M., Oatley, K., & Moldoveanu, M. C.; The Scientific Study of Literature; Issue: 3(1); 2013; Pages: 28-47

http://www-2.rotman.utoronto.ca/facbios/file/(2013b)%20Djikic,%20Oatley,%20&%20Moldoveanu.pdf


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John Scott Lucas's comment, June 20, 2013 5:29 AM
One more reason that high stakes testing is not the answer to our education dilemnas.