Exposition Art Blog
44 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Stass Paraskos - The Figurative Painting

Exposition Art Blog: Stass Paraskos - The Figurative Painting | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
"Stass Paraskos (17 March 1933 – 4 March 2014) was an artist from Cyprus, although much of his life was spent teaching and working in England.Paraskos was born in Anaphotia, a village near the city of Larnaca, Cyprus in 1933, the second of six sons of a shepherd farmer. He went to England in 1953 and became a cook in his brother's restaurant in the city of Leeds. This was a popular haunt of the local art students who encouraged Paraskos to enrol for classes at Leeds College of Art (later Leeds Metropolitan University). Despite not having the usual entry qualifications, Paraskos was spotted by the college's inspirational Head of Fine Art, Harry Thubron, who made certain Paraskos was accepted.There he became close friends with artists such as Dennis Creffield, Terry Frost and Wilhelmina Barns-Graham, with Frost and Barns-Graham persuading Paraskos to move to St Ives in Cornwall in 1959. In St Ives Paraskos shared a studio with Barns-Graham until he returned to Leeds in 1961 and began teaching at Leeds College of Art.. Paraskos's style of painting is figurative but non-naturalistic, and he uses bright colours to describe scenes which often seem rooted in his childhood in Cyprus. He is also influenced by the Byzantine church art of Cyprus, and modern masters, such as Paul Gauguin and Henri Matisse."


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Alan Shields - Post-Minimalism

Exposition Art Blog: Alan Shields - Post-Minimalism | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
"Alan Shields was a celebrated American Post-Minimalist artist. His brightly colored, unstretched textile paintings investigated the grid: Often using industrial cotton belting, Shields cut, beaded, sewed, and dyed monumental abstract pieces, using crafting techniques or humble materials throughout his interdisciplinary practice. Shields’ work is both playful and psychedelic, evocative of the counter-culture scene of his time. Influenced by the radical ideas and designs of architect Buckminster Fuller, Shields began incorporating geodesic-like tent structures in his work, such as Whirling Dervish (1968–70) and Dance Bag (1985). Born on February 4, 1944 in Herington, KS, Shields studied studio art, civil engineering, and theater at Kansas State University, but never graduated. His career began with a successful show in 1969 at Paula Cooper Gallery, which continued to exhibit his work for the rest of his life. Shields became a memorable figure in the New York art scene, known his hand-made clothes featuring colorful patterns and beads."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Edwin Ruda - Between Minimalism and Geometric Abstraction

Exposition Art Blog: Edwin Ruda - Between Minimalism and Geometric Abstraction | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
"Unafraid to step beyond stylistic boundaries, Edwin Ruda consistently probed the incongruities and connections between minimalism and the geometric and lyrical modes of abstraction. Ruda’s band paintings embody his efforts to reconcile these two divergent forms. The result is an elegant, radiant body of work. Loosening the flow of his paint, Ruda introduced pure and translucent bands of colors that are rarely part of minimalist statements. He then worked through the resulting contradictions without allowing structure or formlessness to dominate."


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Emilio Scanavino - Italian Abstract Art

Exposition Art Blog: Emilio Scanavino - Italian Abstract Art | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
After an initial interest in figurative art, Scanavino's paintings took Post-Cubist nuances. His forms became increasingly stylized, until being completely obliterated in the works from the early 1950s. In 1954 his characteristic sign, “stylized knot”, started to appear. That is the , eventually marking his whole production. In the late 1970s years paintings, the “knot” became perfectly defined and recognizable, although his work became darker, sometimes even threatening due to the conspicuous presence of red stains resembling blood. Although Scanavino is difficult to place inside a specific artistic movement, he can be considered an informal abstractist, close to the Abstract Expressionism and Hans Hartung and Georges Mathieu's art.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Pino Pascali

Exposition Art Blog: Pino Pascali | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
Anthony Poon Kin Soon (21 April 1945 - 2 September 2006) was one of the pioneer abstract artists in Singapore best known for his paintings in the Wave Series which he began working on in 1976. t was during the late 1970s that he produced the Wave Series, abandoning the shaped canvas for the square frame, although order and symmetry remained the operative logic. This was followed by the Frequency series in the early 1980s, a truncated variant of the wave motif. Here, the illusion of three-dimensionality emerged as an interest of his. He also explored chromatic ranges in the Colour Theory series during this period.Here, abstraction was the predominant form of expression, although Poon deferred in being more conceptual, analytical and controlled as compared to his contemporaries. His early works, although containing figurations instructive of the formal teachings of NAFA, already showed signs of semi-abstraction.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Anthony Poon - Abstract Art

Exposition Art Blog: Anthony Poon - Abstract Art | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
Anthony Poon Kin Soon (21 April 1945 - 2 September 2006) was one of the pioneer abstract artists in Singapore best known for his paintings in the Wave Series which he began working on in 1976. t was during the late 1970s that he produced the Wave Series, abandoning the shaped canvas for the square frame, although order and symmetry remained the operative logic. This was followed by the Frequency series in the early 1980s, a truncated variant of the wave motif. Here, the illusion of three-dimensionality emerged as an interest of his. He also explored chromatic ranges in the Colour Theory series during this period.Here, abstraction was the predominant form of expression, although Poon deferred in being more conceptual, analytical and controlled as compared to his contemporaries. His early works, although containing figurations instructive of the formal teachings of NAFA, already showed signs of semi-abstraction.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Herbert Gentry - Expressionist Paintings

Exposition Art Blog: Herbert Gentry - Expressionist Paintings | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
"Artist Herbert Gentry (1919-2003) made vibrant expressionist paintings of figures and faces, mixing global influences and African American experience. Referring to his childhood during the Harlem Renaissance, Gentry asserted “Harlem prepared me for Paris.” After completing military service in World War II, Herb Gentry returned to Paris for art school - and found himself in the heart of the expatriate American community in Montparnasse. Gentry moved to Scandinavia in 1959, but always kept a studio in Paris. In 1969, he returned to New York and became a resident of the famous Chelsea Hotel. At home on both continents, Herbert Gentry resided, painted and exhibited on both sides of the Atlantic. His work is represented in important national and international museum collections." “I paint what I experience, who I am, in the Black world, especially in America, there’s a thing that you can’t forget where you came from, you paint from your experiences, who you are”


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Bill Bollinger - Post Minimalism Art

Exposition Art Blog: Bill Bollinger - Post Minimalism Art | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
Bill Bollinger (July 15, 1939 – May 27, 1988) was an American artist. In the late 1960s, he was one of the foremost sculptors of his time, routinely mentioned in the same breath as the likes of Bruce Nauman, Robert Smithson, Eva Hesse and Richard Serra. His work can be categorized as minimalist or postminimalist art..In his works, Bill Bollinger made frequent use of standard industrially fabricated products. The artist explained his approach: “I only do what it is necessary to do. There is no reason to use color, to polish, to bend, to weld, if it is not necessary to do so.”For the Channel Pieces from 1965 to 1968, he joined together extruded aluminum profiles to create works with additive and rhythmic properties. These were followed by the Pipe Pieces made from aluminum pipes held together with fittings and the Rope Pieces, consisting of a rope stretched between two terminal points within the exhibition space. In the Cyclone Fence Pieces, Chain-Link Fence Pieces, Wire Pieces and Screen Pieces from 1968 and 1969, Bollinger utilized commercially available wire mesh and netting. They allowed him to lend expression to the painterly and graphic questions of space and the fundamental laws of physics


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Noah Purifoy - Outdoor Desert Art Museum

Exposition Art Blog: Noah Purifoy - Outdoor Desert Art Museum | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
"His earliest body of sculpture, constructed out of charred debris from the 1965 Watts rebellion, was the basis for 66 Signs of Neon, the landmark 1966 group exhibition on the Watts riots that traveled throughout the country. As a founding director of the Watts Towers Art Center, Purifoy knew the community intimately. His 66 Signs of Neon, in line with the postwar period’s fascination with the street and its objects, constituted a Duchampian approach to the fire-molded alleys of Watts. This strategy profoundly impacted artists such as David Hammons, John Outterbridge and Senga Nengudi. For the 20 years that followed the rebellion, Purifoy dedicated himself to the found object, and to using art as a tool for social change. In the late 1980s, after 11 years of public policy work for the California Arts Council, where Purifoy initiated programs such as Artists in Social Institutions, which brought art into the state prison system, Purifoy moved his practice out to the Mojave desert. He lived for the last 15 years of his life creating ten acres full of large-scale sculpture on the desert floor. Constructed entirely from junked materials, this otherworldly environment is one of California’s great art historical wonders."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Roman Empire - Byzantine art

Exposition Art Blog: Roman Empire - Byzantine art | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
"The Byzantine Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire and Byzantium, was the continuation of the Roman Empire in its eastern provinces during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople (modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium). It survived the fragmentation and fall of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD and continued to exist for an additional thousand years until it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453...Byzantine art refers to the body of Christian Greek artistic products of the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire, as well as the nations and states that inherited culturally from the empire. Though the empire itself emerged from Rome's decline and lasted until the Fall of Constantinople in 1453, the start date of the Byzantine period is rather clearer in art history than in political history, if still imprecise. Many Eastern Orthodox states in Eastern Europe, as well as to some degree the Muslim states of the eastern Mediterranean, preserved many aspects of the empire's culture and art for centuries afterward."


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Saul Leiter - Painted Photographs

Exposition Art Blog: Saul Leiter - Painted Photographs | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
Saul Leiter (December 3, 1923 – November 26, 2013) was an American photographer and painter whose early work in the 1940s and 1950s was an important contribution to what came to be recognized as the New York school of photography In the early 2000s, Saul Leiter came to the fore as one of the most accomplished and surprising colour photographers of the 20th century. Books were published, films made and exhibitions launched. While it was never a secret, few of those who are familiar with Leiter’s photography are aware that over the years he created, in his own unhurried way, a yet–to–be appreciated and equally formidable body of paintings and painted photographs. "In his paintings Saul Leiter managed to convey the deep sense of observation characteristic of his photography. His works on paper are relatively small in scale. Most of them are abstract and somewhat flat, although occasionally a discernible figure emerges. Leiter used water-based paints (watercolor, gouache or casein) in loose and at times quasi-transparent brushstrokes, superimposing cold and warm hues to compose his fragile images.... Acknowledging these different approaches and using color as his driving force, Saul Leiter embraced photography with a painter's eye, creating honest depictions that translate his perceptions into a perceivable palette of emotions for the viewer to absorb."


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Josef Istler

Exposition Art Blog: Josef Istler | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
Josef Istler was a Czech visual artist who was born in 1919. Josef Istler has had several gallery and museum exhibitions, including at the Museum Kampa, The Jan and Meda Mládek Foundation. Many works by the artist have been sold at auction, including 'Swamp' sold at Art Consulting Prague 'Post-War & Contemporary Art Evening Sale' in 2016 for $60,783. The artist died in 2000.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Toshimitsu Imai - Japanese Abstract Art

Exposition Art Blog: Toshimitsu Imai - Japanese Abstract Art | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
"Toshimitsu Imai was an influential 20th-century Japanese painter. Best known for his monumental abstract works, Imai composed his canvases with a combination of thick impasto marks and fluid, inky lines to build chaotic, “allover” compositions. His striking works comprise of specifically delineated shapes, forms, and compositions, with his aesthetic often described as representative of a uniquely Japanese sensibility. The artist derived inspiration from a wide range of sources and time periods, including medieval history, philosophy, Fauvism, poetry, and song lyrics. ."


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Stass Paraskos - The Figurative Painting

Exposition Art Blog: Stass Paraskos - The Figurative Painting | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
Stass Paraskos (17 March 1933 – 4 March 2014) was an artist from Cyprus, although much of his life was spent teaching and working in England.Paraskos was born in Anaphotia, a village near the city of Larnaca, Cyprus in 1933, the second of six sons of a shepherd farmer. He went to England in 1953 and became a cook in his brother's restaurant in the city of Leeds. This was a popular haunt of the local art students who encouraged Paraskos to enrol for classes at Leeds College of Art (later Leeds Metropolitan University). Despite not having the usual entry qualifications, Paraskos was spotted by the college's inspirational Head of Fine Art, Harry Thubron, who made certain Paraskos was accepted.Paraskos's style of painting is figurative but non-naturalistic, and he uses bright colours to describe scenes which often seem rooted in his childhood in Cyprus. He is also influenced by the Byzantine church art of Cyprus, and modern masters, such as Paul Gauguin and Henri Matisse.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Edwin Ruda - Between Minimalism and Geometric Abstraction

Exposition Art Blog: Edwin Ruda - Between Minimalism and Geometric Abstraction | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
"Edwin Ruda was an American painter who was born in 1922. Edwin Ruda has had several gallery and museum exhibitions, including at the Grey Art Gallery, New York University and at the David Richard Gallery, Santa Fe. Several works by the artist have been sold at auction, including 'Palisade' sold at Sotheby's New York 'Contemporary Art' in 2013 for $10,000. There have been many articles about Edwin Ruda, including 'Edwin Ruda, 1922-2014' written for Art Media Agency in 2014. The artist died in 2014.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Emilio Scanavino - Italian Abstract Art

Exposition Art Blog: Emilio Scanavino - Italian Abstract Art | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
After an initial interest in figurative art, Scanavino's paintings took Post-Cubist nuances. His forms became increasingly stylized, until being completely obliterated in the works from the early 1950s. In 1954 his characteristic sign, “stylized knot”, started to appear. That is the , eventually marking his whole production. In the late 1970s years paintings, the “knot” became perfectly defined and recognizable, although his work became darker, sometimes even threatening due to the conspicuous presence of red stains resembling blood. Although Scanavino is difficult to place inside a specific artistic movement, he can be considered an informal abstractist, close to the Abstract Expressionism and Hans Hartung and Georges Mathieu's art.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Pino Pascali

Exposition Art Blog: Pino Pascali | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
“Pascali beautifully combined primary and mythical forms of Mediterranean culture and nature (Mother Goddess and Venus, the Sea, the Land, the Fields, the agricultural tools and rituals) with childish representations of Play and Adventure (prehistorical animals, animals of the zoo and the sea, war toys, the world of Tarzan and the jungle, caterpillars and worms, costumes, Punchinello).He translated the world of imagination into monumental forms and essential structures, concise, like the Apulian romanesque features and the medieval bestiary characteristics of its churches, which at the same time remind us of the symbols of spreading mass culture (comics, cinema, fashion). He makes his “fake sculptures” with fragile and ephemeral materials (canvas, wood, steel wool, acrylic hair, straw, raffia). By doing so he offers an original and critical response o new trends coming from the United States, such as Pop Art and Minimal Art.”


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Anthony Poon - Abstract Art

Exposition Art Blog: Anthony Poon - Abstract Art | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
Anthony Poon Kin Soon (21 April 1945 - 2 September 2006) was one of the pioneer abstract artists in Singapore best known for his paintings in the Wave Series which he began working on in 1976. t was during the late 1970s that he produced the Wave Series, abandoning the shaped canvas for the square frame, although order and symmetry remained the operative logic. This was followed by the Frequency series in the early 1980s, a truncated variant of the wave motif. Here, the illusion of three-dimensionality emerged as an interest of his. He also explored chromatic ranges in the Colour Theory series during this period.Here, abstraction was the predominant form of expression, although Poon deferred in being more conceptual, analytical and controlled as compared to his contemporaries. His early works, although containing figurations instructive of the formal teachings of NAFA, already showed signs of semi-abstraction. He quickly developed a unique style, centred on his interest in the spatial relationship between line and colour. This was evident in the Kite series of geometric abstractions and aerodynamic shapes on shaped canvas, developed just before his return to Singapore.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Herbert Gentry - Expressionist Paintings

Exposition Art Blog: Herbert Gentry - Expressionist Paintings | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
"Although Gentry may not be as well-known as some of his contemporaries, his influence on artists and musicians of his time spans continents. However, because he spent so much time traveling, he never established a firm enough reputation in any one place. He painted in a semi-figural abstract style, suggesting images of humans, masks, animals and objects caught in a web of circular brush strokes, encompassed by flat, bright color. He has suggested that his works are uncalculated- coming from his subconscious- painting what he feels as he feels it. Gentry’s striking images are the product of his exposure to exotic people and places throughout his lifetime. "It’s the magic that does the painting, and the magic is within. I can’t see having substance without having magic in the painting. I use hands, fingers, I’ll use anything at that point, it depends. ... I believe sometimes you use the thing nearest if it’s possible. ... The main thing is to get that idea over quickly. Because that feeling, that thought is a very short thought, as an artist it doesn’t last a long time. If you can get it down right away, work with it technically later on. For example, you see a form...should I...shouldn’t I...PUT IT DOWN! Then technically, if it doesn’t fit or you didn’t do it right, you can work with it. But that feeling, that idea, that spiritual thing, you just put it down right then!"


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Milena Olesinska - Abstract Composition

Exposition Art Blog: Milena Olesinska - Abstract Composition | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
Abstract Composition oil painting on canvas 80cm x 60cm 2018 - 700 USD...My Website : http://paintingsfororder.blogspot.com/p/blog-page.html
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Bill Bollinger - Post Minimalism Art

Exposition Art Blog: Bill Bollinger - Post Minimalism Art | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
Bill Bollinger (July 15, 1939 – May 27, 1988) was an American artist. In the late 1960s, he was one of the foremost sculptors of his time, routinely mentioned in the same breath as the likes of Bruce Nauman, Robert Smithson, Eva Hesse and Richard Serra. His work can be categorized as minimalist or postminimalist art..In his works, Bill Bollinger made frequent use of standard industrially fabricated products. The artist explained his approach: “I only do what it is necessary to do. There is no reason to use color, to polish, to bend, to weld, if it is not necessary to do so.”For the Channel Pieces from 1965 to 1968, he joined together extruded aluminum profiles to create works with additive and rhythmic properties. These were followed by the Pipe Pieces made from aluminum pipes held together with fittings and the Rope Pieces, consisting of a rope stretched between two terminal points within the exhibition space. In the Cyclone Fence Pieces, Chain-Link Fence Pieces, Wire Pieces and Screen Pieces from 1968 and 1969, Bollinger utilized commercially available wire mesh and netting. They allowed him to lend expression to the painterly and graphic questions of space and the fundamental laws of physics
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Noah Purifoy - Outdoor Desert Art Museum

Exposition Art Blog: Noah Purifoy - Outdoor Desert Art Museum | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
Noah S. Purifoy (August 17, 1917 – March 5, 2004) was an African-American visual artist and sculptor, co-founder of the Watts Towers Art Center, and creator of the Noah Purifoy Outdoor Desert Art Museum.He lived and worked most of his life in Los Angeles and Joshua Tree, California. Purifoy was the first African American to enroll in Chouinard Art Institute (now CalArts) as a full-time student and earned his BFA in 1956, just before his fortieth birthday. He is best known for his assemblage sculpture, including a body of work made from charred debris and wreckage collected after the Watts Riots of August 1965.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Roman Empire - Byzantine art

Exposition Art Blog: Roman Empire - Byzantine art | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
"The Byzantine Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire and Byzantium, was the continuation of the Roman Empire in its eastern provinces during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople (modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium). It survived the fragmentation and fall of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD and continued to exist for an additional thousand years until it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453....Byzantine art refers to the body of Christian Greek artistic products of the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire, as well as the nations and states that inherited culturally from the empire. Though the empire itself emerged from Rome's decline and lasted until the Fall of Constantinople in 1453, the start date of the Byzantine period is rather clearer in art history than in political history, if still imprecise. Many Eastern Orthodox states in Eastern Europe, as well as to some degree the Muslim states of the eastern Mediterranean, preserved many aspects of the empire's culture and art for centuries afterward."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Saul Leiter - Painted Photographs

Exposition Art Blog: Saul Leiter - Painted Photographs | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
Saul Leiter (December 3, 1923 – November 26, 2013) was an American photographer and painter whose early work in the 1940s and 1950s was an important contribution to what came to be recognized as the New York school of photography In the early 2000s, Saul Leiter came to the fore as one of the most accomplished and surprising colour photographers of the 20th century. Books were published, films made and exhibitions launched. While it was never a secret, few of those who are familiar with Leiter’s photography are aware that over the years he created, in his own unhurried way, a yet–to–be appreciated and equally formidable body of paintings and painted photographs. "In his paintings Saul Leiter managed to convey the deep sense of observation characteristic of his photography. His works on paper are relatively small in scale. Most of them are abstract and somewhat flat, although occasionally a discernible figure emerges. Leiter used water-based paints (watercolor, gouache or casein) in loose and at times quasi-transparent brushstrokes, superimposing cold and warm hues to compose his fragile images.... Acknowledging these different approaches and using color as his driving force, Saul Leiter embraced photography with a painter's eye, creating honest depictions that translate his perceptions into a perceivable palette of emotions for the viewer to absorb."


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Milena Olesinska
Scoop.it!

Exposition Art Blog: Toshimitsu Imai - Japanese Abstract Art

Exposition Art Blog: Toshimitsu Imai - Japanese Abstract Art | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
"Toshimitsu Imai was an influential 20th-century Japanese painter. Best known for his monumental abstract works, Imai composed his canvases with a combination of thick impasto marks and fluid, inky lines to build chaotic, “allover” compositions. His striking works comprise of specifically delineated shapes, forms, and compositions, with his aesthetic often described as representative of a uniquely Japanese sensibility. The artist derived inspiration from a wide range of sources and time periods, including medieval history, philosophy, Fauvism, poetry, and song lyrics.."


more...
No comment yet.