Exploring technology and the transfer of money for Stage 2 classrooms
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Scootle

Scootle | Exploring technology and the transfer of money for Stage 2 classrooms | Scoop.it
Amelia Heath's insight:

This is an IWB resource from Scootle, an activity recommended by the NSW government's MoneySmart teaching program. It focuses on exploring the transfer of funds in an international trade context, specifically how buying and selling works across international markets. The format is somewhat similar to that of the bee app (see earlier scoop), however it is much more advanced. It should be used in the classroom to explore the international implications of technology in the transfer of money after students have built up a base knowledge of the topic, and are familiar with concepts such as the electronic transfer of funds between bank accounts. This game can be a whole class activity played out on the IWB, particularly effective if you ask students to come to decisions as a whole, perhaps by voting, and invite students to justify their decision in terms of the global trade environment. This will stimulate class discussion, hopefully bringing out a range of different viewpoints and getting the students not just to know about the content, but to think critically about it when put in a decision making position. The higher order thinking skills that this task demands, if placed at the end of a unit of work on the role of technology in the transfer of money, will give students a framwork within which to place the information that they have been given.

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Bee Farming

Bee Farming | Exploring technology and the transfer of money for Stage 2 classrooms | Scoop.it
Get Bee Farming on the App Store. See screenshots and ratings, and read customer reviews.
Amelia Heath's insight:

"Bee farming" is an economy simulation app where students take on the tole of honey producers. To make their business profitable, they must examine the "Beedex" to watch global prices, and sell and transfer funds accordingly. This game can be played on an ipad in small groups or as a class, depending on budget limitations and availability of the technology. While quite light hearted, this game is quite an effective introduction to the use of technology in the realm of global business. However, in the classroom, this app should not serve as a lesson in itself, but should be accompanied by a class discussion connecting the concepts explored in the game to their implications in "real life"; it is important that the students understand that global transfer of money with technology is not just part of the app, but a central feature of the modern global economy. 

Teachers must also take into account the digital literacy of their students when using this resource, and assess whether essential skills such as use of the ipad interface need to be taught explicitly first to make the lesson effective. Melhuish and Falloon (2010) sum up the considerations that need to be made when using the ipad as a tool for learning in this article for teachers; http://researchcommons.waikato.ac.nz/bitstream/handle/10289/5050/Looking%20to%20the%20future.pdf?sequence=1. Overall, this app provides a very user friendly way to introduce students to the enormous concept of the global business economy, and the role of technology within it.

 

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MilbaDjunga - Paying Bills - MoneySmart Teaching - YouTube

Visit http://www.teaching.moneysmart.gov.au for a range of financial literacy teaching resources and professional development. This video is part of theMilba...
Amelia Heath's insight:

This video demonstrates a simulated bill-paying activity, part of a series demonstrating the MoneySmart program for Indigenous students, an Australian Securities and Investments Comission initiative. The activity provides students with a hands-on opportunity to practice real life processes involved in the transfer of money. Relationship to place is a vital element of Indigenous pedagogy (Harrison & Greenfield, 2012) that is created in this lesson by having real members of the local business community attend to request and accept "bills" as they do in real life. This gives the exercise an overwhelming sense of relevance to place, local community, and life beyond the school classroom, in turn giving students a sense of understanding about why they are learning about the content in the first place.

 The role of technology in this process could be made more explicit by having a spreadsheet on the IWB with an electronic display of the student's and business's simulated bank balances, which are edited electronically by the teacher according to payments made, after the students have calculated their budget manually as shown in the video. This will show explicitly that although the electronic transfer of money is invisible, it is still a literal transfer of funds from one party to another.

 

Harrison, N., Greenfield, M. (2012). Relationship to Place: positioning Aboriginal knowledge and perspectives in classroom pedagogies. Critical Studies in Education. (2) 65-76. 

 

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Program Overview | StartSmart

Program Overview | StartSmart | Exploring technology and the transfer of money for Stage 2 classrooms | Scoop.it
Amelia Heath's insight:

The Commonwealth Bank of Australia has launched a "startsmart" initiative involving 45-50 minute in-school workshops that introduce primary students to key concepts of money management, and the role of technology within that, specifically banks, bank cards, exchanging money electronically in return for goods and services, and Australian and International currency. The workshop is certainly engaging, and the delivery of this lesson from a real Australian financial institution reinforces the relevance of the information to the outside world. The major benefit of this workshop is the follow-up teacher support and activities that come with the package. The follow up activities reinforce concepts such as using a bank card, and therefore make it easy to collect evidence for assessment demonstrating the student's knowledge of these concepts. An assessment framework for the content could be "Do my students understand the role of a bank card in the transfer of money?". The follow-up activities could demonstrate this in a concrete way. Whilst this is a valuable program in teaching students about technology and the transfer of money, it must be kept in mind that it is an initiative of the Commonwealth Bank, and so the presentation will be given from that viewpoint/agenda. As long as teachers are aware of this, this remains to be a valuable exercise.

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game_savingaccount.pdf

Amelia Heath's insight:

This is a simple board game from Making Cents, a resource for Australian teachers and parents to equip children with financial skills. This activity is remarkably suited to exploring the use of technology in the transfer of money as it introduces and requires students to actively use key terms such as "deposit" "withdraw" "laybuy" and "bank". 

In the classroom, students could be split into mixed-ability pairs to complete this game, each student provided with a calculator and each pair with dice and the gameboard. Students must calculate where they stand financially with each roll of the dice (depending on what they land on), and the aim is to not run out of money before the other student. This would also be an effective numeracy activity, requiring students to interpret what mathematical function the terms in the game are requiring them to perform (withdraw, deposit, spend etc), addressing outcome MA2-2WM; selects and uses appropriate mental or written strategies, or technology, to solve problems. This activity is effective in demonstrating to students the centrality of technology in the transfer of money, as the board game assumes that all transactions and deposits are electronic, and by actively engaging in the game students are reminded that the invisibility of these electronic transfers does not make them any less real. The game also allows students to experience in a low pressure environment the consequences of withdrawing more than what is deposited in an electronic bank account. 

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