Exploring Marine Biology
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Exploring Marine Biology
Why to become a Marine Biologist.
Curated by Hannah Valente
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So You Want to Be A Marine Biologist: Deep Sea News Edition

So You Want to Be A Marine Biologist: Deep Sea News Edition | Exploring Marine Biology | Scoop.it
ARRRRR ME HEARTIES!!!! So ye want t' be a pirate, t' sail the open sea searching for booty - what? You said a marine biologist? Oh. Well, sailing the open sea searching for booty is actually prohibited by UNOLS regulations - what?
Hannah Valente's insight:

The Last Article I found is by far my favorite. Miriam Goldstein for Deep Sea News wrote it. Her take on Marine Biology is that its not pulling golf balls out of a whale’s blowholes or hugging dolphins. It’s figuring out the way the ocean works! She brings up Dr. Milton Love list of three really bad reasons to want to be a marine biologist and two really good reasons to want to be a Marine Biologist. The moral of Dr. Love’s list is that becoming a Marine Biologist is a very unique but tremendously rewarding career. You have to have a solid, traditional science background to be a marine biologist. This means the standard coursework in biology, chemistry, physics, math, and statistics. Assuming you want to be a marine BIOLOGIST, take lots of biology! Ecology, evolutionary biology, genetics, microbiology, cell biology, invertebrate zoology…even if the course is not directly about marine science, you will be learning skills that can answer questions about the ocean. Getting started, work in a lab, take a semester abroad, and do independent research. After graduation, go directly to graduate school, then get a job in academic science, not academic science, and a non-science job and volunteer with scientists. She ends the article with a quote from Michael Pollan  “Basic science. Lots and lots. Mostly research.” Really sums up my whole Scoop it project! (:

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Marine Biologist

Marine Biologist | Exploring Marine Biology | Scoop.it
Learn about the term marine biologist - what a marine biologist is, what marine biologists do, steps to becoming a marine biologist, and how much marine biologists earn.
Hannah Valente's insight:

According to MarineLife.com they also agree becoming a Marine Biologist is more than just training whales and dolphins! Their definition is anyone who studies or works with salt-water animals and plants. From the largest whales to the tiniest microbes, and every species in between it’s being studied by Marine Biologists all over the world. The term "marine biologist" is very general - an actual marine biologist usually deals with one specific topic. Some titles include "ichthyologist" (someone who studies fish), "cytologist" (someone who studies whales), marine mammal trainer, or microbiologist (someone who studies microscopic organisms). Marine Biologists could work at colleges and universities, government agencies, non-profit organizations, or at many privately owned businesses. The work varies from outside “in the field”, in a lab, in an office, or a combination of all three! In the process of becoming a marine biologist, you will likely need at least a bachelor's degree, and possibly graduate work, such as a master's or Ph.D. degree. Since marine biology jobs are competitive, it will usually be easier to get a position if you have gained relevant experience during high school or college. This can include volunteer work or an internship at a zoo, aquarium, educational facility or conservation organization, and a summer or part-time job at a camp, educational facility or non-profit organization.

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Julia Goetz's comment, January 13, 2013 10:09 PM
Hannah's article describes a career as a marine biologist. This field is very broad ranging from scientists who study tiny microbes to others who dedicate their time to learning about whales. Marine biologists usually work in academic settings, the government, private businesses, or non-profit organizations. The career requires at minimum a bachelor's degree in biology and usually graduate work. Students who are interested in marine biology should start early to get experience in the field by volunteering at places like zoos, aquariums, and educational facilities.
Hannah did a very good job summarizing the career in marine biology. I would have added the salary information because it is a key part in choosing a career path. Exploring the path of marine biology is not my first choice, but I would consider a career related to marine biology. As a photojournalist, I could take pictures of Hannah's discoveries and promote her work to the world. I do not think I would want to obtain a degree in biology although I could see myself working at a zoo or an aquarium. I enjoy spending time with animals. I think Hannah would make an excellent marine biologist, and I hope she can follow her dream.
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Careers in Marine Biology - SWFSC

Hannah Valente's insight:

According to Southwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries Service, many people today are familiar with the term "marine biologist," most don't realize that, in reality, the job title of marine biologist rarely exists. The term is actually used for many jobs in the marine sciences, which deal with the study of marine life, not just for those, which deal with the physical properties of the sea--though many biologists study both. So a marine biologist might be a biological technician, ichthyologist, fishery biologist, microbiologist, systems analyst, or a mathematician. Even economists and sociologists, who deal with living marine resource issues, are found within the field of marine biology. In addition, other marine scientists concern themselves exclusively with the physical and chemical aspects of the sea, like physicists, hydrologists, and physical oceanographers. Courses recommended preparatory courses in basic biology, zoology, chemistry, physics, biometrics, mathematics, and statistics are very important. English is also very important, too, because one of the most important activities of a marine biologist is writing scientific papers and getting them published. Courses in the aquatic sciences such as fishery biology, ichthyology, and oceanography are also important, as well as courses in your of interest Courses in the social sciences are also recommended for occupations that deal mainly with the public, public policies, or management.

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Marine Careers :: Marine Biology

Marine Careers :: Marine Biology | Exploring Marine Biology | Scoop.it
Hannah Valente's insight:

According to Marine Careers, one of the most all-encompassing fields of oceanography is the study of a Marine Biologist. A Marine Biologist studies all marine life, their behaviors and their interactions with the environment. Marine Biologists use the basic studies of all aspects of oceanography.  They, with other biological oceanographers try to use the "big picture" approach to doing their research. Marine Biologist usually picks one particular interest because there are so many topics under the field. One up and coming area of specialization is the field of Marine Biotechnology, where scientists develop drugs, which can come from marine organisms. The scientists could also be seen in defense where scientists have developed non-toxic coatings to prevent the buildup of fouling organisms. These coatings can be useful for ships and intake pipes in many power plants. Another related field is Molecular Biology, where researchers apply molecular approaches to many different environments and many different organisms. It has aided in helping to find diseases in organisms and when the organism in question is microscopic or similar to other organisms. Marine biotechnology and molecular techniques have also aided aquaculture, the farming of shellfish, seaweeds, and finfish.

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How to Become a Marine Biologist: Education and Career Roadmap

How to Become a Marine Biologist: Education and Career Roadmap | Exploring Marine Biology | Scoop.it
People who searched for How to Become a Marine Biologist: Education and Career Roadmap found the following information relevant and useful.
Hannah Valente's insight:

According to Education Portal, the first step in becoming a Marine Biologist is Research the education and career requirements, training information, and experience required for starting a career in this field. Much of the Marine Biologist’s time is spent in the field collecting data about plant and animal species. This data is then analyzed in a lab or an office, to advance the understanding of species and their environments. Marine biologists must have knowledge and skills in biology, chemistry, physics, geology, and ecology. Entry-level jobs require at least a bachelor's degree in biology. A master's degree can equip one to attain higher-paying consulting, teaching, or research jobs. A marine biology PhD is needed for most marine biology-specific careers in independent research and college-level teaching. Attached in the chart found on their website given by The US Bureau of Labor Statistics.

 

Common Requirements

Degree Level

PhD for teaching at the postsecondary level and for most research jobs; at least a bachelor's degree for entry-level jobs*

Degree Fields

Marine biology or other biological sciences (e.g. ecology, molecular biology, zoology)**

Experience

Requirements vary widely with hiring companies and how much education someone already has***

Key Skills

Active learning and listening, critical thinking, complex problem solving, mathematics, science, speaking, writing**

Computer Skills

Scientific and analytical software like Visual Molecular Dynamics and Gene Codes Sequencher, plus Adobe Photoshop and Microsoft Excel **

Technical Skills

Experience with microscopes, centrifuges, and pipettes**

Step 1 is Earning a Bachelor's Degree in Marine Biology or Biology. Step 2 is Completing a Master’s Degree Program in Marine Biology. Step 3 is Getting a PhD in Marine Biology. 

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Becoming a Marine Biologist

Becoming a Marine Biologist | Exploring Marine Biology | Scoop.it
Marine biology is all about studying, observing, and protecting the marine plants, coral reefs, seaweeds and marine organisms. It is a very challenging and rewarding career.
Hannah Valente's insight:

According to Buzzle.com, a Marine Biologist is a very challenging but very rewarding career, which I agree with completely. The ocean’s surface contains 99% of the living space on earth but only less than 10% has been named and classified by scientists. Reading this fact made me even more interested in becoming a Marine Biologist! A typical day of a marine biologist involves working and observing species underwater and working in a research lavatory. Buzzle recommends taking the high school math and science classes more seriously to prepare you for the college classes you will eventually take. Also reading books and watching documentaries will definitely give you a profound insight into this fascinating work. Valuable knowledge and experience can be found in taking up volunteering at a local aquarium, beach, or lab. It will work to your advantage if you get experience working both in the lab and in the field while you are at the university. Also they recommend trying to maintain a high-grade point average as it will count, and only then start looking for colleges that specialize in marine biology. After graduating from great colleges such as the 65 in the US that offer courses in marine biology, the real challenge begins. It will take a minimum of four years to obtain a Bachelor's degree in science. It will take another two to five years to obtain a Master's degree. You’re your dream starts to become a reality when you go through the entrance exams and interview sessions. Some aspiring marine biologists also enroll for undergraduate programs, which is related to their field, like: Oceanography, Marine science, Marine biology, and Environmental science and Fisheries science.

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Julia Robinson's comment, January 13, 2013 9:10 PM
This article talked about what it meant to be a marine biologist, as well as how to get the education necessary to start a career as one. Becoming a marine biologist requires that you take not only high school level math and science, but also that you take them in college. There are many colleges with marine biology courses available for you. On top of that, you also have to study for a couple more years to get your Master’s degree. I was surprised to learn that only 10% of the ocean has been named and classified, while the living space on the Earth’s surface is 99% the ocean. The article then went on to describe the requirements for being a marine biologist. As I mentioned earlier, it requires that you take a lot of math and science courses. The article also described the responsibility of being a marine biologist -even though you do not hear them mentioned very often, their job is vital to helping us understand our planet, and helping to preserve it, which I completely agree with. I think it's great that you are so interested in it Hannah, and I agree with you: studying marine biology sounds really interesting. Great job!
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Becoming a Marine Biologist

Hannah Valente's insight:

According to SUNY Stony Brook, a marine biology is the field of knowledge relating to all marine organisms. A marine Biologist is someone who works in some way studying, protecting, observing, or managing marine organisms. Now these organisms could be a microbe or a plant or animal. Marine Biologist can do DNA sequences of marine life, observe them in laborites, or make theoretical models. Marine Biologist does many things and people have many different takes on what exactly then do. Many people think that Marine Biologist is a just dolphin trainer while others believe they just sit in wildlife sanctuaries all day. Both could possibly be true. Many young people dream of becoming a dolphin and whale trainer but there are actually very few people who study whales and other marine mammals. . You can easily become a professional basketball player than spend your life-studying whales. Same thing for dolphin trainers. Yes there are many public aquaria in the United States, but the number of people that work with dolphins as trainers are also very few. There are two routes on the road to marine biology careers. First by majoring in Biology in college and taking a few courses in physiology, evolution, and vertebrate biology. The other way would be to become a veterinarian with the hopes of understanding mammalian anatomy and physiology. 

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