Exploring Differing Viewpoints on Community Heritage... A Collection of Resources
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Ida's Quest

Ida's Quest | Exploring Differing Viewpoints on Community Heritage... A Collection of Resources | Scoop.it
'Ida's Quest' an historical journey through the Bathurst District in 1901 by Ida Traill aged 10. The story has riddles to be solved and links to history pages and student activities. Educational site aimed at primary school students studying local history and heritage.
Abby Clarke's insight:

I would use this resource within the classroom as a beginning point of students considering different viewpoints on local community heritage. By considering each aspect of Ida’s quest and the varying aspects of importance to her families’ heritage, students are provided with an opportunity to closely explore the heritage of a community and contrast it with the familiarity of their own.

 

Resource:

Ida’s Quest is an interactive resource that can be used by both teachers and students. Focused upon one families heritage in Bathurst this resource explores important aspects of Heritage to the family looking into old practices, places and influential people in Ida’s family history.

 

Teaching Ideas:

One way that students in stage 2 consider a range of different viewpoints on community heritage is by considering how their community is different to other Australian communities (CSS2.2 & CUS2.4).

 

One activity I would utilise through this resource is by using it as a stimulus to allow students to create their own exploration of their local community. This allows students with the opportunity to consider and ask questions about heritage sites within their community and why they are important. It also allows students to consider how that communities heritage may have changed, how different communities were formed within the larger community and the significant people who influenced the local heritage. By using the same structure as Ida’s quest students become involved in an ongoing unit of work where each student researches the local community and contributes to a class creation of a quest. Using an overarching goal in such activities has been attributed to creating continuing engagement with each smaller task (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).

 

Literacy

In stage 2 students have begun planning, composing and reviewing a range of texts for different audiences so this activity provides an important opportunity to explore the different interactive text types used throughout Ida’s Quest such as riddles, the structure of letters and the use of language techniques (NSW Board of Studies, 2012) .

 

References:

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia

 

NSW Board of Studies. (2012). English K-6 Syllabus. Retrieved 06/04/2014 from: http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/english/english-k10/

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Community Heritage

Community Heritage | Exploring Differing Viewpoints on Community Heritage... A Collection of Resources | Scoop.it
Abby Clarke's insight:

This resource is part of an initiative by the Australian Government to capture stories and aspects of what makes up the Australian Community Heritage. The website is directed by four key aspects- People, places, events and groups. Within each of these headings teachers (or students) have the opportunity to search use an interactive map to find their local community and discover the different aspects that is seen as heritage. This resource also provides users with the opportunity of contributing their own family or community stories.

 

Teaching Idea:

This website is a perfect opportunity for students to explore online, gather information and contribute to an online resource which is a key content area within stage 2 (Board of Studies, 2006). While it is assumed that students have already developed key skills in relation to the use of websites it is important that tasks being used with this resource have been scaffolded in a way that student learning is optimized (Dufficy, 2005).

 

An engaging activity that could be used with this resource is for students to create their own admission to the community website. As Gilbert and Hoepper (2011) contend the use of ICT within the classroom provides a significant opportunity to engage students learning. Further more, they contend that an effective investigation involves students having a goal at the end of their unit that they work towards (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011). By using the goal of a submission the teacher has the opportunity to engage students in a process of exploring, gathering, creating, editing and producing their own individual text about their heritage. Processes that the NSW Quality Teaching framework outlines as an important technique in assisting students gain a greater significance from the task.

 

Resources:

 

Board of Studies, (2006). Human Society and It’s Environment K-6 Syllabus Board of Studies. 

 

Dufficy, P. (2005). Designing Learning for Diverse Classrooms. Sydney: Primary English Teaching Association Australia.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia

NSW Department of Education and Training. (2006a). Quality teaching in NSW public schools: A classroom practice guide. Sydney: Author. Retrieved 5 May, 2012 from https://www.det.nsw.edu.au/media/downloads/proflearn/secure/clasprag.pdf

 

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Aboriginal People & Cultural Life

Aboriginal people have attachments to the landscape stretching back many thousands of years. Find out about their ancient, living heritage.
Abby Clarke's insight:

I would use this resource within the classroom because it provides an authentic view of Aboriginal heritage. Each story, memory and historical depiction has been directly passed on by an Elder or Aboriginal group and not only defines the significance of spiritual and historical elements but also highlights the location and independent clan that each are connected to. Such identification is paramount in assisting students to gain a critical understanding of the differences of viewpoints and traditions between Aboriginal clans. A contribution that demonstrates the commitment made by the NSW Aboriginal and Training Policy (2008) of increasing knowledge and understanding of the histories, cultures and experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

 

Teaching Ideas:

As this resource provides an authentic Aboriginal voice it can be significantly used throughout many of the outcomes in Stage 2. In particular it can be used to provide the Aboriginal viewpoint of heritage within the classroom, however, it can also be used to consider different versions of local heritage within different Australian communities (CCS2.2 & CUS2.4).

An important teaching activity using this resource would be the contrast and the challenge of the differing viewpoints on the definition of cultural heritage. The western concept of community heritage is generally based on tangible objects whilst Aboriginal cultural heritage is based on connections with intangible objects such as the spoken word of stories, memories, recollections and spiritual connections with the land. In using this within the classroom I would highlight the important distinction between the two and provide students with the opportunity to ask questions, explore different stories, perspectives, consider differences and present their findings to the class.

 

Additional links:

http://splash.abc.net.au/media/-/m/103044/aunty-beryl-carmichael-on-spirit-and-culture

 

Resources:

 NSW Department of Education and Training, (2008). Aboriginal Education and Training Policy. Retrieved from https://www.det.nsw.edu.au/policies/students/access_equity/aborig_edu/aetp_intro.pdf

 

 

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NSW Migration Heritage Centre

NSW Migration Heritage Centre | Exploring Differing Viewpoints on Community Heritage... A Collection of Resources | Scoop.it
Abby Clarke's insight:

This website is an extremely useful resource as it gives voice to the many migrants living within the Australian community. Living in one of the most multicultural countries in the world, it is fundamental that students have an understanding of how certain experiences can redefine an individuals and a community’s perspective of cultural heritage.

 

The Resource:

The NSW migrant website provides students and teachers with an opportunity to explore personal and community experiences of migration and how this has defined their lives. It does this through a variety of personal and group stories, exhibitions and significant places of migrants who have both recently relocated to Australia and those who migrated many years ago. In considering such, students are given an opportunity to gain a greater insight into the different viewpoints of their peers, local community groups as well as how their own heritage may have been shaped.

 

Teaching idea:

Two outcomes outlined in Stage two are that students learn to describe the different viewpoints of the community as well as explain the effects of change to their views and heritage (CCS2.2 & CUS2.4). As this resource provides students with a window into the different viewpoints of heritage from the migrant community it can be used in a multitude of ways.

 

One activity I would utilise was a contrasting of texts. As this website provides a multitude of resources and galleries I select a variety of different stories and illustrations and give students an opportunity to explore and contrast differences between migrant groups and their respective heritage.

 

Another activity I would use would be through using migrant stories within the resource as a stimulus for researching student’s own heritage. With the goal of creating their own story for the website students use an inquiry based approach to explore their own heritage and how it may have developed. This activity provides students with an opportunity to discover their own individual heritage and how that differs from everyone else’s. A learning technique that has been attributed to promoting critical inquiry interest within the classroom as students individual reflections are all appreciated (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).

 

Assessment:

Both activities above provide an opportunity for built in assessment where teachers match an assessment task to the content of the unit (Winch, 2010). In doing such teachers can assess how their students are progressing in their understanding and respect of different viewpoints of communities.

 

 

References:

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy: reading, writing and children’s literature (4th Ed). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press. 

 

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Difference Differently

Difference Differently | Exploring Differing Viewpoints on Community Heritage... A Collection of Resources | Scoop.it
Abby Clarke's insight:

I would use this resource within the classroom as it offers a simple but effective way to incorporate a global perspective of community heritage within the classroom. Using the activity of a community calendar, this resource explores a variety of student’s ideas about different cultural, religious and nationally significant days. Further more it provides an area for inquiry where students explore the five ‘W’s’ (who, why, where, what and when)- an important characteristic of an inquiry based approach. In incorporating this resource into the classroom I would utilise the opportunity to explore the importance of perspective and to create a sense of connection both within the classroom, local and global community.

 

Teaching Ideas:

In Stage 2 students explore different communities and the different viewpoints on both individual and shared heritage (Outcome CUS2.4). The teaching ideas suggested below tackle two content strands within this outcome:

-       Gathers information about significant multicultural celebrations in the local community or in other communities

-       Describes different ways in which citizens in communities can value and respect others, eg acknowledging that people have the right to hold different viewpoints”

(Board of Studies, 2008, p29)

As this resource provides singular views of significant traditions it is crucial that the concept and implications of different views on shared heritage has been explored.

 

One activity I would build from this scaffold would be a comparison of perspectives. Using the example of Australia Day I would contrast the resource example with that of an Indigenous perspective by identifying with the class what the different viewpoints were and why they have that viewpoint. If appropriately structured and planned this resource has the opportunity to assist students in beginning to think critically about heritage and the different meanings that can be attached to it.

 

The second learning opportunity this resource creates is that of creating a connectedness within the classroom. In the analysis of successful schools, Newmann and Wehlage (1993) identified that one aspect of important pedagogy within the HSIE strand was creating learners who are connected to their local and national community (Cited from Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011). An activity I would use in relation to this would be asking students in pairs to investigate a certain community’s tradition by considering why they celebrate and whether other communities have a different view point of the tradition.

 

By providing an opportunity to consider important traditions to communities this resource assists students in not only viewing themselves as part of the global community but also in gain a greater understanding and respect for their peers and community members (Bliss, 2010).

 

Literacy/ Drama Link

Another activity that I would explore through this resource is role-playing whereby the class explores both familiar and different traditions within the global community. By using the research collected from the above activities students are given the opportunity to explore and vicariously experience familiar and different traditions within the global community. An aspect that has been attributed to providing additional dimensions of learning for students whilst strengthening speaking, writing and reading skills (Marsh, 2008).

 

Additional Links:

http://nacchocommunique.com/2014/01/24/naccho-aboriginal-health-and-january-26-debate-what-does-australia-day-mean-for-our-mob/

 

References

 

Bliss, Dr. S. (n.d.). Primary Human Society and It's Environment (HSIE).Global Education Resources. Retrieved April 6, 2014, from www.ptc.nsw.edu.au/SiteMedia/w3svc361/Uploads/Documents/GLOBAL%20PERSPECTIVES%20-%20PRIMARYDOC..pdf

 

Board of Studies, (2006). Human Society and It’s Environment K-6 Syllabus Board of Studies. 

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia

Marsh, C. (2008). Chapter 2: Planning for Learning, Studies of Society and Environment: Exploring the Teaching Possibilities (5th Ed). Pearson Education Australia, French’s Forest. 

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