Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions
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Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions
People, places and things that are shaking up the status quo http://xeeme.com/JanGordon
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How the Science of Attention is Changing Work and Education [Videos]

How the Science of Attention is Changing Work and Education [Videos] | Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions | Scoop.it

Absolutely fascinating - Maria Popova from her blog Brainpickings brings us  Cathy Davidson, founder of Duke University’s Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, who has written a thought provoking new book,  Now You See It: How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn — a meditation on how “attention blindness” the peculiar phenomenon illustrated by Harvard’s famous invisible gorilla experiment, (which is shown in one of the videos in this post) has produced one of our culture’s greatest disconnects, the inability to reconcile the remarkable changes induced by the digital age with the conventions of yesteryear’s schools and workplaces.


"As long as we focus on the object we know, we will miss the new one we need to see. The process of unlearning in order to relearn demands a new concept of knowledge not as thing but as a process, not as a noun but as a verb.” ~ Cathy Davidson


Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions"


See full article and videos here: [http://bit.ly/u3Anrz]

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Networked Society 'On the Brink' - Emerging Opportunities Enabled by Technology [Video]

On The Brink is a discussion the past, present and future of connectivity with a mix of people including David Rowan, chief editor of Wired UK; Caterina Fake, founder of Flickr; and Eric Wahlforss, the co-founder of Soundcloud.


**Each of the interviewees discusses the emerging opportunities being enabled by technology as we enter the Networked Society.


**Concepts such as borderless opportunities and creativity, new open business models, and today's 'dumb society' are brought up and discussed.


Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions"


Click here to see the video: [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R7cuatm_bqw&feature=youtu.be]

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janlgordon's comment, November 7, 2011 2:41 PM
Hi Oliver, Pretty amazing stuff right? It really gets one thinking about at all the possibilities, innovation and things that haven't even been created yet. Exciting times to say the least:-)
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Can Technology Help You Deal with Uncertainty?

Can Technology Help You Deal with Uncertainty? | Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions | Scoop.it

Great article with thought provoking observations, good suggestions and even a graphic to highlight her ideas that speaks for itself. by Conversationagent,


Intro:


"This is a slightly different question I asked a couple of years back. Invest in better promises There are many ways to deal with uncertainty."


Here's are a few thing that caught my attention:


Today, we put the term "social" in front of media, marketing, networks and bolt features on. Social media is the modern version of the telephone.


****Social media is not the conversation.


****It's not the answer to all your prayers.


****If you're at the point of praying, then the business model is the one needing help.


****It's the room in which you hold the conversation. It still comes down to saying, doing, or producing something valuable for your customer.


It's early days. Many a platform being built could be the predecessor of something else much more useful in the future.


****Right now, people don't converse, they comment. Big difference. Technologies have evolved greatly.


We're still catching up. - yes we are



Curated by JanLGordon covering Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions

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Cities Are Immortal; Companies Die

Fascinating post by John Hagel from Silicon Valley @jhagel! Great insights, food for thought...........

 

Here's an excerpt:

 

All companies die. All cities are nearly immortal.

Both are type of networks, with different destinies. There are two basic network forms: organisms or ecosystems. Companies are like organisms, while cities are like ecosystems.

 

All organisms (and companies) have share many universal laws of growth. Creatures age in the same way, whether they are small animals, large mammals, starfish, bacteria, and even cells. They share similar metabolic rates. Similar distributions. All ecosystems (and cities) also share universal laws. They evolve and scale in a similar fashion among themselves — whether they are forests, meadows, coral reefs, or grasslands, or villages.

 

Geoff West from the Santa Fe Institute has piles of data to prove these universal and predictive laws of life. For instance, organisms scale in a 3/4 law. For every doubling in size, they increase in other factors by less than one, or .75. The bigger the organism, the slower it goes. Both elephants and mice have the same number of heartbeats per lifespan, but he elephant beats slower.

 

Ecosystems and cities, on the other hand, scale by greater than one, or 1.15. Every year cities increase in wealth, crime, traffic, patents, pollution, disease, infrastructure, and per capita by 15%. The bigger the city, the faster it goes.

A less than one rate of exponential growth inevitably leads to an s-curve of stagnation. All organisms and companies eventually stagnate and die. A greater than one rate of exponential leads to a hockey stick upshot of seemingly unlimited growth. All cities keep growing. As West remarked: We can drop an atom bomb on a city and 30 years later it will be thriving.

 

http://www.kk.org/thetechnium/archives/2011/07/cities_are_immo.php

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Finding Meaning Together on the Real-Time Web

This is an inspiring piece by Jeff Pulver, Founder of the #140 Conferences, angel investor, curator and so much more. I have had the good fortune of attending the #140 Conferences, meeting people in real life, hearing about miracles that occurred as a result of connecting through social networks.


Excerpt:


We are seeing what happens when you are living in a world where hundreds of millions of people can discover each other, and communicate directly; where barriers to entry and in fact gatekeepers slowly go away.


We are seeing what happens when people discover each other, discover that they can feel and connect, and can touch and engage.


We now have generations of people who realize that they are living in a world of 7 billion other people, and where for the first time in our human history every voice matters. There is profoundness in terms of where this brings us.


There is a virtualization even though we are in the physical. There is still something happening spiritually, that is touching, changing, and connecting many of us.


Some of us, unfortunately are kind of numb to it. They do not get it. They feel something but they do not know why they feel it.


There are other people who actually have this intense ability not only to feel, but sometimes affect positive change. So these technologies are helping us accelerate some things.


Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions"


Read full article here: [http://pulverblog.pulver.com/archives/009319.html]

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Thought Leaders Discuss The Future of Curation & Social Media

Thought Leaders Discuss The Future of Curation & Social Media | Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions | Scoop.it
We asked Mark Cuban, Dennis Crowley, Gina Bianchini, and more than a dozen others. Here's what they said.


This article by Dan Frommer and Jen Ortiz for Business Insider links to a slideshow with quotes from major Social Media company CEOs and co-founders, intellectuals and a Curated Twitter persona, among others about their takes on the future of Social Media. 


Here's just one of them, from Dae Mellencamp, CEO of Vimeo:


**** "The future of social media is the loss of the distinction between media and social interaction online. Mass media and social media will be seamlessly integrated across devices and platforms to offer relevant, dynamic, personalized experiences for people anywhere.


**Discoverability and the import of editorial curation will not be lost, but rather inherently incorporated into the environments for richer and more customized experiences."


The full article has many more gems and is well worth a few minutes of your time!


Read full article: [http://read.bi/tgVOQe]

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Is Massively Collaborative Mathematics Possible? Yes, Here's How!

Clay Shirky http://www.shirky.com referred to this blog post in his talk today “Social Media, Curating, and Convening: Getting Value from Group Interaction” http://www.extension.iastate.edu/broadcasts/nevc2011/


The post is about The Polymath Project on Growers blog Clay talked about how to harvest collective wisdom on complex problems.


Intro:


"Of course, one might say, there are certain kinds of problems that lend themselves to huge collaborations. One has only to think of the proof of the classification of finite simple groups, or of ar of a rather different kind of example such as a search for a new largest prime carried out during the downtime of thousands of PCs around the world.


****But my question is a different one.


****What about the solving of a problem that does not naturally split up into a vast number of subtasks?


****Are such problems best tackled by people for some that belongs to the set ? (Examples of famous papers with four authors do not count as an interesting answer to this question.)


Here's a highlight from this piece: Think of the implications in other areas of collaboration in ways that are valuable to your community.


**Suppose one had a forum (in the non-technical sense, but quite possibly in the technical sense as well) for the online discussion of a particular problem. The idea would be that anybody who had anything whatsoever to say about the problem could chip in.


**And the ethos of the forum — in whatever form it took — would be that comments would mostly be kept short. In other words, what you would not tend to do, at least if you wanted to keep within the spirit of things, is spend a month thinking hard about the problem and then come back and write ten pages about it.


****Rather, you would contribute ideas even if they were undeveloped and/or likely to be wrong. This suggestion raises several questions immediately. First of all, what would be the advantage of proceeding in this way?


Curated by JanLGordon covering "Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions"


http://bit.ly/rneCb6

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