Evolving Urbanism
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Mobile phone-based mapping of human movement - FT.com

Mobile phone-based mapping of human movement - FT.com | Evolving Urbanism | Scoop.it
How quickly can you visit the largest museum in the world? In Jean-Luc Godard’s film Bande à part (1964), the three main characters run through the Louvre in nine minutes and 43 seconds, supposedly breaking the record for the fastest visit. The dash
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Internet of Things: Future Cities Lab CEO, City Innovation Group founder discuss art installations and projects using sensors - Silicon Valley Business Journal

Internet of Things: Future Cities Lab CEO, City Innovation Group founder discuss art installations and projects using sensors - Silicon Valley Business Journal | Evolving Urbanism | Scoop.it
Future Cities Lab's CEO describes his approach to creating interactive artwork for public spaces. And in an entirely different approach, City Innovation Group's founder talks about what she learned by attaching sensors to trash floating down a city's aqueduct system.
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Use of sensors to create installations in public space.

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A truly smart city is more than sensors big an all-seeing internet | Guardian

A truly smart city is more than sensors big an all-seeing internet | Guardian | Evolving Urbanism | Scoop.it
Investing billions in big data and smart technology isn’t the only answer to building more sustainable urban areas. We need to focus on the big levers

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Infographic: The Landscape of Location-Based Data | NextGov

Infographic: The Landscape of Location-Based Data | NextGov | Evolving Urbanism | Scoop.it

Opportunities for the government to collect data are everywhere.

 

Big data has become integral to government technology. But what will happen in the future? Deloitte's Gov2020 initiative predicts "location becomes an integral dimension of data, allowing information patterns and decisions to be viewed through the lens of place." According to Gov2020, everything from medicine to energy will have a geo-layer added. ...


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The Internet of Things has four big data problems - O'Reilly Radar

The Internet of Things has four big data problems - O'Reilly Radar | Evolving Urbanism | Scoop.it

The Internet of Things (IoT) has a data problem. Well, four data problems. Walking the halls of CES in Las Vegas last week, it’s abundantly clear that the IoT is hot. Everyone is claiming to be the world’s smartest something. But that sprawl of devices, lacking context, with fragmented user groups, is a huge challenge for the burgeoning industry.

 

What the IoT needs is data. Big data and the IoT are two sides of the same coin. The IoT collects data from myriad sensors; that data is classified, organized, and used to make automated decisions; and the IoT, in turn, acts on it. It’s precisely this ever-accelerating feedback loop that makes the coin as a whole so compelling.

 

Nowhere are the IoT’s data problems more obvious than with that darling of the connected tomorrow known as the wearable. Yet, few people seem to want to discuss these problems ...


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Assembling Cities: STS concepts and methodologies in planning studies | Matthijs Kouw

Assembling Cities: STS concepts and methodologies in planning studies | Matthijs Kouw | Evolving Urbanism | Scoop.it

The field of science and technology studies (STS) is renowned for studying the ways in which science, technology, and society are intertwined, but how can it contribute to the study of urban planning and cities?


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When the world becomes the web (Wired UK)

When the world becomes the web (Wired UK) | Evolving Urbanism | Scoop.it
The internet of everything isn't Wi-Fi fridges and devices with bolted on connectivity: it's tiny, cheap sensors that will bring everyday objects to the network -- in their billions
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Public participation platforms change the dynamic between city and citizen | TheCityFix

Public participation platforms change the dynamic between city and citizen | TheCityFix | Evolving Urbanism | Scoop.it

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The Sense-able city: We don’t need to build new cities – a simple reboot of the existing ones

The Sense-able city: We don’t need to build new cities – a simple reboot of the existing ones | Evolving Urbanism | Scoop.it

We don’t need to build new cities – a simple reboot of the existing ones will do. An account of human sensors and smart trash.

 

What was empty space just a few years ago is now becoming New Songdo in Korea, Masdar in the United Arab Emirates or PlanIT in Portugal — new “smart cities”, built from scratch, are sprouting across the planet and traditional actors like governments, urban planners and real estate developers, are, for the first time, working alongside large IT firms — the likes of IBM, Cisco, and Microsoft.

The resulting cities are based on the idea of becoming “living labs” for new technologies at the urban scale, blurring the boundary between bits and atoms, habitation and telemetry. If 20th century French architect Le Corbusier advanced the concept of the house as a “machine for machineliving in”, these cities could be imagined as inhabitable microchips, or “computers in open air” ...


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New Book: The City as Interface. How New Media Are Changing the City by Martijn de Waal

New Book: The City as Interface. How New Media Are Changing the City by Martijn de Waal | Evolving Urbanism | Scoop.it

Digital and mobile media are changing the way urban life takes shape and how we experience our built environment. On the face of it, this is mainly a practical matter: thanks to these technologies we can organize our lives more conveniently. But the rise of ‘urban media’ also presents us with an important philosophical issue: How do they influence the way that the city functions as a community?

Employing examples of new media uses as well as historical case studies, Martijn de Waal shows how new technologies, on one level, contribute to the further individualization and liberalization of urban society. There is an alternative future scenario, however, in which digital media construct a new definition of the urban public sphere. In the process they also breathe new life into the classical republican ideal of the city as an open, democratic ‘community of strangers’.


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Rob Kitchin's curator insight, February 11, 2014 5:02 AM

Book finally turned up today, months after being ordered!  It is now published.

Manu Fernandez's curator insight, February 11, 2014 6:39 AM

Long wait, but it is finally here!

Raymond Versteegh's curator insight, February 12, 2014 3:28 AM

The City As Interface by Martijn de Waal--A Must Read for Any Smart Cities follower

 

In Helsinki, in 2010 - 2011,  I met up with the inspired people of Forum Virium, led by Jarmo Eskalinen, the innovation agency of the city, while I still spread the word of Cisco's Smart + Connected Communities. We talked about the city as a platform, connecting all nfrastructures, objects & devices, and data in the city. One of the young professionals called it 'The City As The Interface'. 

 

In 2012, I took this with me to Almere; with the city, internationale companies, local entrepreneurs, students and citizens we actually building an urban platform, as in 'The City As Interface', to be showcased as a proof of concept in Spring 2014, and scaled citywide in 2015. 

 

Am sure to learn from this book by Martijn de Waal.

 

Ray

 

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Smart Cities: what we’re doing and why | Nesta

Smart Cities: what we’re doing and why | Nesta | Evolving Urbanism | Scoop.it
During 2014 Nesta will be involved in over a dozen projects designed to make a reality of the promise of smart cities. This blog summarises some of our analysis, and lists the main relevant projects we’re involved in.

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Technology Is Not Driving Us Apart After All | NY Times

Technology Is Not Driving Us Apart After All | NY Times | Evolving Urbanism | Scoop.it
It turns out, we may be more social than we were 30 years ago — at least in public spaces.

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Cities Look to Technology for Answers to Growing Challenges | MIT Technology Review

Cities Look to Technology for Answers to Growing Challenges | MIT Technology Review | Evolving Urbanism | Scoop.it
Mobile apps, sensors, and other technologies help cities handle growing challenges.
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How technology can help us redesign our cities – and lives

How technology can help us redesign our cities – and lives | Evolving Urbanism | Scoop.it
From analysing our urban spaces to ensure they encourage social cohesion, to connecting household appliances to the internet to regulate our energy needs, technological developments promise an exciting future for city living
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Barcelona’s Smart City Ecosystem: A big investment in data-driven city management starts to pay off | MIT Technology Review

Barcelona’s Smart City Ecosystem: A big investment in data-driven city management starts to pay off | MIT Technology Review | Evolving Urbanism | Scoop.it

Gardeners making their rounds through Barcelona’s Parc del Centre del Poblenou these days are as likely to carry tablets as trowels. The city recently moved 178 of its irrigation points to an Internet-controlled system. While it is handy to manage watering at the keyboard instead of turning a knob on a pipe, much of the advantage is in the data that the new system sends back to a central software system the city has built. ....

 


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Crowd-sourcing, connectivity and citizen empowerment: the future of our cities | The Drum

Crowd-sourcing, connectivity and citizen empowerment: the future of our cities | The Drum | Evolving Urbanism | Scoop.it

Everybody wants their city to be better: from less dog poo in the streets and improved city transportation to a better economy. But how is a smarter city born? ...


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Copenhagen Lighting the Way to Greener, More Efficient Cities | NY Times

Copenhagen Lighting the Way to Greener, More Efficient Cities | NY Times | Evolving Urbanism | Scoop.it
Urban areas around the world are installing wireless networks of streetlamps and sensors that could ease traffic congestion and reduce carbon emissions.

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Knowing and governing cities through urban indicators, city benchmarking and real-time dashboards | Regional Studies, Regional Science

Knowing and governing cities through urban indicators, city benchmarking and real-time dashboards | Regional Studies, Regional Science | Evolving Urbanism | Scoop.it

(2015). Knowing and governing cities through urban indicators, city benchmarking and real-time dashboards. Regional Studies, Regional Science: Vol. 2, No. 1, pp. 6-28. doi: 10.1080/21681376.2014.983149

 

Since the mid-1990s a plethora of indicator projects have been developed and adopted by cities seeking to measure and monitor various aspects of urban systems. These have been accompanied by city benchmarking endeavours that seek to compare intra- and inter-urban performance. More recently, the data underpinning such projects have started to become more open to citizens, more real-time in nature generated through sensors and locative/social media, and displayed via interactive visualisations and dashboards that can be accessed via the internet. In this paper, we examine such initiatives arguing that they advance a narrowly conceived but powerful realist epistemology – the city as visualised facts – that is reshaping how managers and citizens come to know and govern cities. We set out how and to what ends indicator, benchmarking and dashboard initiatives are being employed by cities. We argue that whilst these initiatives often seek to make urban processes and performance more transparent and to improve decision making, they are also underpinned by a naive instrumental rationality, are open to manipulation by vested interests, and suffer from often unacknowledged methodological and technical issues. Drawing on our own experience of working on indicator and dashboard projects, we argue for a conceptual re-imaging of such projects as data assemblages – complex, politically-infused, socio-technical systems that, rather than reflecting cities, actively frame and produce them.


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Dan Hill on the positives and negatives of using data to manage cities

Dan Hill on the positives and negatives of using data to manage cities | Evolving Urbanism | Scoop.it
Data is being used to predict behaviour and manage cities but the idea of the "Predictive City" should be treated with a dose of scepticism argues Dan Hill.
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The rise of the smart city | The New Economy

The rise of the smart city | The New Economy | Evolving Urbanism | Scoop.it
We examine the top 20 cities that look the likeliest to drive change in the future, in The New Economy’s Smart Cities 2014

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Legible Cities conversation with Erhardt Graeff from MIT Media Lab | Unified Field

Eli: How can Legible Cities be manifested? Now it is mostly a concept. I was reading Townsend's book on big data and smart cities, which inspires this question. If city government's are more interested in using smart city models for promoting economic development and front the street development seems to take the form of Foursquare or Arduino projects, what is there out there for the "people's" view? Who would own and manage these new types of projects? ......


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Opinion: Dan Hill on 'smart cities' - DesignCurial

Opinion: Dan Hill on 'smart cities' - DesignCurial | Evolving Urbanism | Scoop.it
The smart-cities movement has been around for nearly a decade, often feeling like a solution searching for a problem -- Cedric Price's aphorism 'Technology is the answer, but what was the...
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The Rise and Fall and Eventual Rise Again of the 'Smart City' | Atlantic Cities

The Rise and Fall and Eventual Rise Again of the 'Smart City' | Atlantic Cities | Evolving Urbanism | Scoop.it

It would have been hard to miss the messaging over the last five years: Major global tech firms like IBM, Cisco, and Siemens seemingly all adopted the same "smart cities" mission at the same time. And they weren't alone. Across the globe, technology companies of all sizes have taken aim at the burgeoning smart city market, a nebulous term that can include anything from complex networks of government-controlled sensors and cameras to a parking meter that sends you a text message when you run out of time on the meter.

 

For Anthony Townsend, research director at the Palo Alto-based Institute for the Future and an adjunct assistant professor of planning at NYU Wagner, the rise of the "smart city" concept is both the result of global economic forces and the culmination of decades of technological progress. But with his new book Smart Cities, Townsend also sounds the alarm that the real "smart" city of the future can't and shouldn't merely be a reflection of what large technology companies would like to sell to local governments. Recently we chatted with Townsend about his research and current work on smart cities. ...

 


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