Evolutionary biology
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New plant species a microcosm of biodiversity

New plant species a microcosm of biodiversity | Evolutionary biology | Scoop.it
Biologists working in the Andes mountains of Ecuador have described a new plant species, a wild relative of black pepper, that is the sole home of an estimated 40-50 insect species, most of which are entirely dependent on this plant species for survival. This discovery is part of a larger project which focuses on the influence of plant-produced chemical compounds on biodiversity.
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The evolution of endothermy is explained by thyroid hormone-mediated responses to cold in early vertebrates

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Does Your Microbiological Age Match Your Biological One? – Phenomena: Not Exactly Rocket Science

Does Your Microbiological Age Match Your Biological One? – Phenomena: Not Exactly Rocket Science | Evolutionary biology | Scoop.it
By the time babies are two months old, they start to smile.  By five months, they usually start picking up objects. By 12 months, they’ve probably said their first word. By 18 months, they’re walki...
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A symbiotic way of life: 'Simple and elegant mechanism' regulates relationships between insects and bacteria

A symbiotic way of life: 'Simple and elegant mechanism' regulates relationships between insects and bacteria | Evolutionary biology | Scoop.it
Scientists reveal how, at the cellular level, an animal and its symbiotic bacteria work together to make up a single organismal system.
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How Do You Move A Leg That Was Once A Fin? – Phenomena: Not Exactly Rocket Science

How Do You Move A Leg That Was Once A Fin? – Phenomena: Not Exactly Rocket Science | Evolutionary biology | Scoop.it
Sometime between 360 and 390 million years ago, a group of fishes made the move to life on land. Along the way, their fins gradually transformed into weight-supporting limbs with distinct elbow and...
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Computer rendering: Graduate student brings extinct plants 'back to life'

Computer rendering: Graduate student brings extinct plants 'back to life' | Evolutionary biology | Scoop.it
Most fossilized plants are fragments indistinguishable from a stick, but a graduate student hopes a new technique will allow paleontologists to more precisely identify these fossils. A graduate student showed the power of this technique by turning a 375 million-year-old lycopod fossil into a life-like rendering.
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New Life, From an Arctic Flower That Died 32,000 Years Ago

New Life, From an Arctic Flower That Died 32,000 Years Ago | Evolutionary biology | Scoop.it
A living plant has been generated from the fruit of a little arctic flower, making it the oldest plant by far that has ever been grown from ancient tissue.
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Amber fossil reveals ancient reproduction in flowering plants

Amber fossil reveals ancient reproduction in flowering plants | Evolutionary biology | Scoop.it
A 100-million-year old piece of amber has been discovered which reveals the oldest evidence of sexual reproduction in a flowering plant -- a cluster of 18 tiny flowers from the Cretaceous Period -- with one of them in the process of making some new...
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The Guts That Scrape The Skies – Phenomena: Not Exactly Rocket Science

The Guts That Scrape The Skies – Phenomena: Not Exactly Rocket Science | Evolutionary biology | Scoop.it
Take a walk through the African savannah and you might stumble across huge mounds, made from baked earth. They tower up to 9 metres tall, and are decorated with spires, chimneys and buttresses. The...
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Baby's first gut bacteria may come from mum's mouth - health - 21 May 2014 - New Scientist

Baby's first gut bacteria may come from mum's mouth - health - 21 May 2014 - New Scientist | Evolutionary biology | Scoop.it
It is thought that babies get their first dose of microbes during birth, but these bugs may arrive in the placenta much earlier, from an unexpected place
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New Study Suggests The World Is On The Brink Of The Next Great Extinction | IFLScience

New Study Suggests The World Is On The Brink Of The Next Great Extinction | IFLScience | Evolutionary biology | Scoop.it
Just as we all die, all species eventually go extinct. However, the rate of extinction varies dramatically, and a new estimate suggests we are currently running at 1000 times the normal rate. This rate of extinction is only seen in the fossil record after incredibly dramatic and unusual occurrences, such as huge asteroid strikes or supervolcano eruptions. In order to calculate the effect humans are having we need to know two things – how many species are disappearing each year, and how many vanish as part of the normal background.
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Evolution of Camouflage Drives Rapid Ecological Change in an Insect Community: Current Biology

Evolution of Camouflage Drives Rapid Ecological Change in an Insect Community: Current Biology | Evolutionary biology | Scoop.it
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Butterflies show origin of species as an evolutionary process, not a single event

Butterflies show origin of species as an evolutionary process, not a single event | Evolutionary biology | Scoop.it
The evolution of new species might not be as hard as it seems, even when diverging populations remain in contact and continue to produce offspring. That's the conclusion of studies that examine the full genome sequences of 32 Heliconius butterflies from the Central American rain forest, representing five different species.
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Out of the tropics: study finds source of mammal diversity

Out of the tropics: study finds source of mammal diversity | Evolutionary biology | Scoop.it
Picture a tropical rainforest, with thousands of species per hectare, and it’s quite easy to believe that up to three quarters…
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The Most Fascinating Human Evolution Discoveries of 2013 | Observations, Scientific American Blog Network

The Most Fascinating Human Evolution Discoveries of 2013 | Observations, Scientific American Blog Network | Evolutionary biology | Scoop.it

Summary of some of the exciting human evolution discoveries that 2013 brought to the surface.

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Reconstructing the New World monkey family tree: After landing in Americas, primates spread as far as Caribbean, Patagonia

Reconstructing the New World monkey family tree: After landing in Americas, primates spread as far as Caribbean, Patagonia | Evolutionary biology | Scoop.it
A Duke scientist has reconstructed the most comprehensive family tree to date of the monkeys that arrived in South America 37 or more million years ago and their subsequent evolution.
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