Eutrophicatioin of Lakes
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My Scoop on Eutrophication of Lakes.

    Eutrophication is a process by which an excess of nutrients are added to a lake.  These nutrients are added by nitrogen,phosphorous, intensive agricultural practices, industrial activity, and more.  Although nutrients are important for a lake to have, an excess will result in an overproduction of algae and decrease in oxygen which lessens the amount of native species living in a lake.

    Once nutrients accumulate in a lake, phytoplankton start reproducing which creates an algae bloom. Algae blooms are an excess growth of algae which in small quantities is fine but in large quantities is harmful.  The Algae creates another layer on top of the lake which blocks not only sunlight which is needed for underground plants, but oxygen as well.  This negativley affects an ecosystem and can even affect a food chain because the beginining of the food chain has been killed off.

   A real life example of eutrophication of a lake occured in Lake Erie. The lake recieved an excess amount of nutrients due to all of the farms surrounding the area. The nutrients built up, and alge took over the pond and used all of the oxygen. The lake was then declared dead, but with restoration efforts and new laws the lake has been restore to its original state.

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Eutrophication

Eutrophication | Eutrophicatioin of Lakes | Scoop.it

The lake on the left is Lake Hungabee which is a clear, blue lake. This contrasts with the lake on the right, Lake Taihu which has been affected by the Eutrophication (hence the green color).

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Eutrophication

Eutrophication is when algal growth is increased in a body of water due to increased amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus. The rapid growth of algae decreases the water grade of the lake causing the oxygen level to decrease as well, which is harmful to the organisms that live there. Usually, eutrophication is a natural process where the lake basin is filled up with sediment and nutrients over a few centuries, but due to human input of sewage and other harmful fertilizers into lakes, the process of eutrophication can be rapidly increased to just a few decades. Lake Eerie is an example of the harmful and rapid effects of eutrophication.  

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Eutrophication - Appropedia: The sustainability wiki

Eutrophication - Appropedia: The sustainability wiki | Eutrophicatioin of Lakes | Scoop.it

This shows a before/after picture of how Eutrophication can affect a lake.  Water is completely covered by algae.

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My Scoop on Eutrophication of Lakes.

    Eutrophication is a process by which an excess of nutrients are added to a lake.  These nutrients are added by nitrogen,phosphorous, intensive agricultural practices, industrial activity, and more.  Although nutrients are important for a lake to have, an excess will result in an overproduction of algae and decrease in oxygen which lessens the amount of native species living in a lake.

    Once nutrients accumulate in a lake, phytoplankton start reproducing which creates an algae bloom. Algae blooms are an excess growth of algae which in small quantities is fine but in large quantities is harmful.  The Algae creates another layer on top of the lake which blocks not only sunlight which is needed for underground plants, but oxygen as well.  This negativley affects an ecosystem and can even affect a food chain because the beginining of the food chain has been killed off.

   

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TEACH: Water Pollution in the Great Lakes

In the 1960’s Lake Erie was official declared dead. Eutrophication had taken over the lake and algae became the main species living in the lake. The algae killed all of the native species by soaking up all of the oxygen from the lake. Event occurred in result of the surrounding basin being so intensively developed with agriculture, the lake received more nutrients than it could handle. In response concerns about the lake the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement was signed by the United States and Canada in 1972, which created a maximum phosphorus levels on the lake. Lake Erie is now below the maximum level and native species are now able to thrive in the lake again.

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