Ethics in Athletic Training
4 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Amanda Gotto from Sports Ethics: Encalade V.
Scoop.it!

Point of the Game: Sports Ethics: Play Through Pain

Point of the Game: Sports Ethics: Play Through Pain | Ethics in Athletic Training | Scoop.it
Conversations on Sports, Ethics and Culture ...

Via Valerie Encalade
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Amanda Gotto from Sports Ethics: Smith, Martin
Scoop.it!

Point of the Game: Sports Ethics: Mistakes Were Made

Point of the Game: Sports Ethics: Mistakes Were Made | Ethics in Athletic Training | Scoop.it
Sports Ethics: Mistakes Were Made. I was startled last week listening to a coach interview when the coach uttered words no coach or leader should ever say, “mistakes were made." I cannot think of a worse statement by ...

Via Martin Smith
more...
Brian Candage's curator insight, May 16, 2014 9:16 PM

This article makes a great point for coaches. If mistakes were made and they were your fault, own up to them. If they were a specific players fault, put the blame on yourself and the team. There is no need to call one player out, I'm sure he/she knows exactly what they did wrong. Bring the issue up to the entire team at the next practice, make the whole team practice what went wrong, but emphasize the correct way to accomplish it. 

James Mackay's curator insight, February 18, 2015 10:19 PM

This was an interesting take on the importance of taking and assigning responsibility in the interest of developing an organization's strong ethical foundation.  A little flippant, but still worth reading.

Rescooped by Amanda Gotto from Sports Ethics in Athletic Training: Mangrobang, J.
Scoop.it!

Study: Kids Competing Too Soon After Concussions

Study: Kids Competing Too Soon After Concussions | Ethics in Athletic Training | Scoop.it
How to keep high school kids with concussions on the bench

Via Peter Mellow, Jose Mangrobang
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Amanda Gotto from Ethics in Athletic Training
Scoop.it!

IDEA Code of Ethics for Personal Trainers

IDEA Code of Ethics for Personal Trainers | Ethics in Athletic Training | Scoop.it
a. Remember that a personal trainer’s primary responsibility is to the client’s safety, health and welfare; never compromise this responsibility for your own self-interest, personal advantage or monetary gain.

Via Sports Ethics: MartinW, Darren Haynes
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Amanda Gotto
Scoop.it!

The Ethics & Role of Sports in Our Society (Part 1)

Fred Whitfield, President & Chief Operatin Officer for the Charlotte Bobcats; and Peter Roby, Athletic Director at Northeastern University, discussed ways in...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Amanda Gotto
Scoop.it!

Hanley Recognized By MAATA For Exceptional Service - ECUPirates.com

Hanley Recognized By MAATA For Exceptional Service - ECUPirates.com | Ethics in Athletic Training | Scoop.it
Hanley Recognized By MAATA For Exceptional Service ECUPirates.com The MAATA honor cites qualified members for their exceptional service and unique contributions to the athletic training profession, and salutes individuals who exemplify both the...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Amanda Gotto from Sports Ethics: Smith, Martin
Scoop.it!

Has money ruined ethics in sports? - SKNVibes.com

Has money ruined ethics in sports? - SKNVibes.com | Ethics in Athletic Training | Scoop.it
SKNVibes.comHas money ruined ethics in sports?SKNVibes.comBASSETERRE, St.

Via Martin Smith
more...
Kelly Joey Seay's curator insight, September 14, 2014 7:42 PM

This is a major reason I feel that ethics has went down hill due to the importance of making more money. 

Richardson, A. 's curator insight, November 16, 2014 9:06 PM

Money and epic salary and endorsement deals certainly has not enhanced and increased ethics in sports.  With millions of dollars to be earned or lost due to wins, contracts and endorsement money, athletes are playing for much more than the love of the game.  In the words of Jerry Maguire, "show me the money."

Mike Falvo's curator insight, January 19, 2015 4:29 AM

I don't think it has COMPLETELY ruined ethics in sports, but it is definitely a driving force in the decisions made on and off the "field" of sport.

Rescooped by Amanda Gotto from Ethics in Athletic Training
Scoop.it!

Anti-doping testers fear reality of genetically modified Olympians

Anti-doping testers fear reality of genetically modified Olympians | Ethics in Athletic Training | Scoop.it

There have been "marathon mice", "Schwarzenegger mice" and dogs whose wasted muscles were repaired with injected substances that switch off key genes. It may not be long before we get the first genetically modified athlete. 

 

Some fear the use of gene therapy to improve athleticism is already a reality. But since sports authorities' drug testing methods still lack the sophistication needed to pick up gene doping, its status remains unclear. What is certain, from scientific studies and from surveys of elite sports people, is that it is technically feasible to use genetic modification to improve sporting performance, and that some athletes are prepared to risk their lives if they could be guaranteed to win gold medals. Officially, UK Anti-Doping, the body which oversees the control of performance enhancing drugs in Britain, says genetic manipulation as a form of performance enhancement "is currently a theoretical rather than a proven issue".

 

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) says it is ploughing "significant" money and resources into research into finding ways to detect genetic enhancement of athletes. 

Gene doping - in which DNA is introduced into the body using an inactivated virus or by other means - could alter a person's genetic make-up and improve athletic performance by increasing muscle growth, blood production, endurance, oxygen dispersal or pain perception. Since it cannot be detected, no one really knows whether athletes are using it or not.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Darren Haynes
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Amanda Gotto from Sports Ethics in Athletic Training: Mangrobang, J.
Scoop.it!

Law to Protect Student Athletes With Concussions Starts

Law to Protect Student Athletes With Concussions Starts | Ethics in Athletic Training | Scoop.it
Natasha’s Law requires trainers and coaches at public schools to undergo training on how to react when players get concussions.

Via Jose Mangrobang
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Amanda Gotto from Sports Ethics in Athletic Training: Mangrobang, J.
Scoop.it!

Ethics in Athletic Training

Ethics in Athletic Training | Ethics in Athletic Training | Scoop.it
Ethics In Athletic Training. Athletic trainers work in a variety of settings and interact with a variety of athletes. During treatment, rehabilitation and training, the athletic trainers are often faced with opportunities to commit unethical acts.

Via Jose Mangrobang
more...
ahmed ben kamagate's curator insight, April 13, 2014 3:19 AM

athletic trainers aren't just on the sideline there also physical therapy facilities and rehab 

Taylor Labar's curator insight, May 14, 2014 10:25 AM

Being in the athletic training field, gives many opportunities for someone to commit unethical acts. Depending on where you work, some schools or athletic programs will allow for some unethical things to happen. It is up to you to decide whether you can live with those decisions if you chose to look the other way.

 

Norm Densley's curator insight, November 12, 2014 8:30 PM

Remember the days when a coach would tell an athlete to "suck it up and get back out there"?

Scooped by Amanda Gotto
Scoop.it!

Thinking Ethically about MRSA

Best practices on dealing with MRSA for coaches, athletic directors and trainers.
more...
No comment yet.