Esther
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Rescooped by Esther Paredes Cabello from neurotransmisores
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Descubriendo las bases neurobiológicas de las ensoñaciones ...

Descubriendo las bases neurobiológicas de las ensoñaciones ... | Esther | Scoop.it
Descubriendo las bases neurobiológicas de las ensoñaciones. ... Una vez conocidas las estructuras que podrían estar implicadas, cabe preguntarse sobre que neurotransmisores participan. Empezando por la vigilia en ...

Via Gabriela Di Doménico
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Maria AD Psicologia's curator insight, April 11, 2017 5:52 PM
Bibliografía: Nielsen, T. and Stenstrom, P. (2005). What are the memory sources of dreaming?. Nature, 437(7063), pp.1286-1289.

Además del evidente interés que siempre ha demostrado el hombre por las ensoñaciones como reflejo de la capacidad de la mente para actuar al margen de la conciencia; estos estudios nos permiten acercarnos aunque sea tímidamente, al funcionamiento de la mente de los pacientes con trastornos mentales.
Rescooped by Esther Paredes Cabello from Amazing Science
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Introduction to Biophotonics - UC Davis Course [20 hours VIDEO]

This is the introductory class for biophotonics with an overview of the UC Davis Center for Biophotonics Science and Technology. It is taught by Marco Molinaro, chief education officer for the center, and James Shackelford, director of the UC Davis Integrated Studies Program and a professor of chemical engineering and materials science.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The physical reality of our digital world

The physical reality of our digital world | Esther | Scoop.it
A popular notion we have of the digital world is that it's almost otherworldly—it's not about physical stuff, it's about stuff that just happens, out there in the air, in space. We speak of cyber space and cloud-computing.
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New Design Makes Previously Inaccessible Proteins Vulnerable to Drugs

New Design Makes Previously Inaccessible Proteins Vulnerable to Drugs | Esther | Scoop.it
A team of researchers at Yale University have identified a molecular signal that allows potentially therapeutic proteins to hitch a ride into cells using vesicles, possibly making previously inaccessible proteins vulnerable to drugs.

 

One of the most daunting challenges facing pharmaceutical scientists today are “undruggable proteins” – the approximately 80% of proteins involved in human disease that do not interact with current drugs. Most drugs today are very small molecules and fit snuggly into relatively deep pockets in a protein, usually to inhibit a chemical reaction. But many proteins involved in disease do not perform chemical reactions. Instead they bind to other proteins, or DNA, or RNA. It has proven extremely difficult to design small molecules that inhibit these binding interactions.

 

This new discovery of a molecular signal allows therapeutic proteins to hitch a ride into cells using vesicles, or small packets of molecular information that fuse with membranes of cells in a process called endocytosis. The signal helps the protein escape from the vesicle to reach the interior of the cell.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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A Map to Nowhere | Digital Humanities Specialist

A Map to Nowhere | Digital Humanities Specialist | Esther | Scoop.it
We struggle with just such a question of metrics all the time in the digital humanities, and so I've experimented with several more off-the-wall measures.
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New membrane can block helium, yet allow water to flow freely

New membrane can block helium, yet allow water to flow freely | Esther | Scoop.it
Membranes and barriers are used all the time in industrial and lab settings, and you may even have a few of them around the home. They can help keep materials apart that need to be separated, or can selectively allow certain materials to mix while holding others back. Graphene, the two-dimensional hexagonal lattice of carbon, is thought to be completely impermeable to all gases and liquids. That would obviously make it an extremely effective barrier film.

 

Initial experiments with gases such as helium, hydrogen, nitrogen, and argon found that almost no gas was able to move across the membrane over a period of a few days. Calculations on these results yielded a helium permeation rate below 10-12 g/cm2*s*bar, consistent with values reported elsewhere for pure graphene films—basically no gas was getting through. Computing the bulk permeability of the material gave a value of approximately 10-15mm*g/cm2*s*bar. Put into more useful terms, this means that less gas will seep through a submicron thick GO film than would pass through a 1 mm thick glass barrier in an equivalent amount of time!

 

Carrying out a similar experiment with common liquids (ethanol, hexane, acetone, decane, and propanol) revealed that no weight loss could be detected after several days of the fluid resting on the membrane. This set an upper limit on liquid bulk permeability of 10-11 mm*g/cm2*s*bar. However, something unexpected happened when they repeated the test with water. There was a huge weight and the evaporation rate was nearly the same as though there was no membrane or barrier in place.

 

After this unexpected result, the authors repeated the test with helium to ensure that no physical damage had occurred to the membrane; no helium leakage was observed. In fact, it was only when the membrane was a couple of microns thick that any resistance to the flow of water was observed. Computing the bulk permeability of water gave a result of 10-5 mm*g/cm2*s*bar, a value 1010 (10,000,000,000) times greater than that for helium. This membrane was essentially impermeable to a small, inert gas, but allowed water to freely move through it.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The Plankton Schooner

The Plankton Schooner | Esther | Scoop.it

"Known as the Tara Oceans, the year-long expedition returned to port in Lorient, France, at the end of March, and already, preliminary analyses of the samples collected has turned up hundreds of thousands of organisms, including bacteria, archaea, protists, metazoans, viruses, and fish larvae. In total, the team collected samples from 153 different locations, from the water surface to depths of nearly 1 kilometer. The preliminary results focus on 27,000 samples from just 35 of those spots, but even from this subset of samples, it’s becoming clear that smaller organisms are more abundant and diverse, Karsenti said, and that there is “an almost entirely unknown viral diversity.” Other findings include the fact that archaea tend to live with bacteria, but not protists or viruses; there is large geographical variation in diversity; and many plankton species appear to be very sensitive to temperature changes and other factors, including ocean streams and acidity. Metagenomic analyses of the samples have also revealed an abundance of unknown protein sequence codes, as well as complex interactions between species of different kingdoms."


Via Ed Rybicki, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Stunning Infrared Photographs

Stunning Infrared Photographs | Esther | Scoop.it

We're no strangers to infrared photography, yet the visual results of the technology never cease to amaze us. Photographer Oleg Stelmach, aka Elektraua, tackles the art of using infrared film to transform viridescent landscapes into mesmerizing expanses of white, icy foliage. His location of choice is the newly reopened part of Kiev called "Andrew's Descent." The urban setting with a healthy dose of towering trees and plant life is given a brand new, wintery look, boasting ivory leaves against a sapphire sky.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Lysin PlyC - a new natural antibiotic with remarkable anti-bacterial properties

Lysin PlyC - a new natural antibiotic with remarkable anti-bacterial properties | Esther | Scoop.it

Scientists have discovered the structure and operating procedures of a powerful anti-bacterial killing machine that could become an alternative to antibiotics.The bacteriophage-encoded lysin, PlyC, kills a large spectrum of bacteria --- species that can cause symptoms ranging from sore throats to pneumonia and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. First identified in 1925, PlyC was purified in the 1960s by Professor Fischetti, but its atomic structure proved elusive until now.

 

Bacteriophages, viruses that specifically infect and kill bacteria using special proteins called lysins, have been investigated as possible treatments since 1919. However, with the discovery of antibiotics in the 1940s, 'phage therapy' was generally abandoned. Because of multi-resistancy development against many antibiotics, there is renewed interest in phage-encoded lysins.

 

PlyC is actually made from nine separate protein 'parts' that assemble to form a very effective bacterial killing machine. It actually resembles a flying saucer carrying two warheads. It operates by locking onto the bacterial surface using eight separate docking sites located on one face of a flying saucer-like structure. The two warheads can then chew through the surface of the cell, rapidly killing the bacteria.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Computer-enhanced imaging technology reveals intricate details of 49 million-year-old spider in Baltic Amber

Computer-enhanced imaging technology reveals intricate details of 49 million-year-old spider in Baltic Amber | Esther | Scoop.it

Scientists have used the latest computer-imaging technology to produce stunning three-dimensional pictures of a 49 million-year-old spider trapped inside an opaque piece of fossilized amber resin.

 

University of Manchester researchers, working with colleagues in Germany, created the intricate images using X-ray computed tomography to study the remarkable spider, which can barely be seen under the microscope in the old and darkened amber. As well as documenting the oldest ever huntsman spider, especially through a short film revealing astounding details, the scientists showed that even specimens in historical pieces of amber, which at first look very bad, can yield vital data when studied by computed tomography.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies: Distinguishing the Hype from the Viable

Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies: Distinguishing the Hype from the Viable | Esther | Scoop.it
A look at Gartner, Inc.'s Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies, a graphical representation of the viability of various technologies across industries.www.technologyinthearts.org/.../hype-cycle-for-emerging-tec...

 

"When new technologies make bold promises, how do you discern the hype from what’s commercially viable? And when will such claims pay off, if at all? Gartner Hype Cycles provide a graphic representation of the maturity and adoption of technologies and applications, and how they are potentially relevant to solving real business problems and exploiting new opportunities."

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