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Active Gaming is Good For Brain Health and Memory

Active Gaming is Good For Brain Health and Memory | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it
According to researchers, playing video games that involve physical activity can help to boost memory and brain health as we age.

Via Stephen P. Yang, Ph.D.
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Meta-Analysis of Exergaming on Physical Activity

Meta-Analysis of Exergaming on Physical Activity | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it
Updates research studies using exergames, exergaming, active video games, games for health, serious games, and game-based learning for fitness.

Via Stephen P. Yang, Ph.D.
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Exergaming (Fitness Video Games) can increase Physical Activity

Exergaming (Fitness Video Games) can increase Physical Activity | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it
Updates research studies using exergames, exergaming, active video games, games for health, serious games, and game-based learning for fitness.

Via Stephen P. Yang, Ph.D.
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Rescooped by Jan Anema from Games: Serious and Social
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Can Serious Games bring playgrounds back to life? - ONSG

Can Serious Games bring playgrounds back to life? - ONSG | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it
Video games have increasingly replaced playgrounds. But are they the real enemy or are they their future? Serious Games are revolutioning the way we play!

Via callooh
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callooh's curator insight, June 30, 2015 7:22 PM

The intersection of serious games and playground games

Rescooped by Jan Anema from Social Media and Healthcare
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Can Social Media Help Prevent and Manage Chronic Disease?

Can Social Media Help Prevent and Manage Chronic Disease? | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it

A new eHealth Initiative (eHI) report makes a pretty amazing claim: social media can help prevent and manage chronic disease. How? By promoting healthy habits, says a Fierce Healthcare article about combating chronic disease with social media.

The eHI report (“A Report on the Use of Social Media to Prevent Behavioral Risk Factors Associated with Chronic Disease”) finds that “social media can reduce the burden of chronic disease on the U.S. health system by providing real-time access to care, information and support that empowers patients to achieve personal health goals, correct high-risk behavior and better manage chronic conditions.” That sounds like win-win: a benefit for payers/providers, as well as patients.

So how does it work? In addition to providing a means for targeting health information to specific populations, eHI says social media can

“make information about a chronic condition or treatment more personable and timely;”
“provide a new channel for peer-to-peer communication among health care consumers, caregivers and family members;”
facilitate “meaningful relationships that can provide support and motivation to cope with chronic conditions;”
“establish communities … with shared experiences to combat isolation, fear and stigma;” and
“engage and empower people to be accountable and achieve their goals.”
Among the types of social tools identified by eHI as having specific utility in managing health were message boards, Internet support groups, blogs and social games/challenges. In addition to the major social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter, eHI also noted online patient communities with social networking components (like HealingWell and SmartPatients).

However, it’s not only the social in social media that makes it effective: the content itself (the media), as shared online, is also critical to communication trends in the health care industry. As stated in the report, “The amount of information that is available for health consumers is growing exponentially at a time when direct face-to-face communication with providers is decreasing due to financial pressures. Social media can increase the reach of information in a scalable, low-cost fashion.”

- See more at: http://blog.mlinc.com/health-science-marketing/can-social-media-help-prevent-and-manage-chronic-disease/#sthash.kOR5wZ8u.dpuf



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Rescooped by Jan Anema from :: The 4th Era ::
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A Beautiful Visual on The Importance of Games in Learning ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

A Beautiful Visual on The Importance of Games in Learning ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it

by Med Kharbach


"Games are very important for learning and James Paul Gee has empirically proved this in his wonderful book " What Video Games Have to Teach Us about Learning and Literacy". Gee argues that games,particularly video games,  require the players to learn and think in ways at which they are not adept. He further states that games provide a life enhancing experience for learners and they also revolutionize the routinized ways of learning through fusing learning and play. You can learn more about Gee's book in this post I have published a few months ago.

"Regarding the importance of games and why they are good for learning, I am sharing with you the graphic below which visualizes some of the pluses of playing games for learners. Check it out and share with us what you think of it."


Via Grant Montgomery, Jim Lerman
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Catherine Young's curator insight, March 19, 2014 10:53 AM

Great visual to remind us that effective learning should also be fun and engaging.

Barbara Gross's curator insight, April 6, 2014 3:32 AM

Read also: http://www.ranj.com/content/serious-gaming

Rescooped by Jan Anema from eHealth
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Philips Unveils New Aging Well Services for Independent Seniors |

Philips Unveils New Aging Well Services for Independent Seniors | | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it
Philips is introducing its new Aging Well Services, a collection of offerings to help seniors live independent, healthy lives in their own homes. The firm

Via Paul Epping
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Research: Video games help with creativity in boys and girls

Research: Video games help with creativity in boys and girls | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it
Children who play video games are more creative, new research suggests. (@SirKenRobinson @mambjo Video games lead to increased creativity and video-spatial skills. Education will catch on?

Via Sara Armstrong, David Spreux
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Rescooped by Jan Anema from Games: Serious and Social
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Can Serious Games bring playgrounds back to life? - ONSG

Can Serious Games bring playgrounds back to life? - ONSG | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it
Video games have increasingly replaced playgrounds. But are they the real enemy or are they their future? Serious Games are revolutioning the way we play!

Via callooh
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callooh's curator insight, June 30, 2015 7:22 PM

The intersection of serious games and playground games

Scooped by Jan Anema
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Using Technology to Help Us Perform Better - PSFK (blog)

Using Technology to Help Us Perform Better - PSFK (blog) | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it
As part of our Future of Connected Life report, here are some of our favorite examples of how the productivity hacking trend is manifesting.
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Rescooped by Jan Anema from ExerGaming
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Exergaming: An Emerging Trend in Senior Health

Exergaming: An Emerging Trend in Senior Health | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it
Exergaming: An Emerging Trend in Senior Health http://t.co/Pb2Tm0rw...

Via Stephen P. Yang, Ph.D.
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Rescooped by Jan Anema from Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness
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Exergaming may offer older people cognitive benefits - Los Angeles Times

Exergaming may offer older people cognitive benefits - Los Angeles Times | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it
Los Angeles TimesExergaming may offer older people cognitive benefitsLos Angeles TimesExergames -- exercise combined with virtual reality -- might give a cognitive boost to older people more than regular workouts, researchers have found.

Via Maggie Rouman
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Rescooped by Jan Anema from eHealth
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Top 12 Israeli apps to keep you healthy

Top 12 Israeli apps to keep you healthy | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it
Israeli developers come to the rescue with apps for everything from monitoring blood sugar to finding the nearest cardiac catheterization lab.

Via Paul Epping
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Rescooped by Jan Anema from ExerGaming
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Kinect Single Limb Stance Exergame

The aim of this study was to understand and practice Kinect SDK by developing a therapeutic exergame.

Via Stephen P. Yang, Ph.D.
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Exergaming podcast with Global PhysEd @PhysedNow

Exergaming podcast with Global PhysEd @PhysedNow | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it
Speaking to Jorge from Physedagogy about exergaming in physical education and other K12 programs

Via Stephen P. Yang, Ph.D.
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These Apps Will Actually Change Your Life

These Apps Will Actually Change Your Life | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it
YOU CAN D

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, Stephen P. Yang, Ph.D.
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Rescooped by Jan Anema from eHealth - Social Business in Health
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Digital Healthcare

Digital Healthcare | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it
games and health (How games improve health infographic http://t.co/hUpwwOoa via @pinterest #mhealth #digitalhealth #healthit #ehealth)

Via rob halkes
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rob halkes's curator insight, February 5, 2013 7:01 AM

And again, an inforgraphic...

Rescooped by Jan Anema from Digital Health
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Digital Health 2016: Top 100 Influencers and Brands

Digital Health 2016: Top 100 Influencers and Brands | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it
An exhaustive list of the top 100 Digital Health influencers and brands driving the most engagement in 2016, including quotes from the experts.
Via Alex Butler
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New video games may improve mental health

New video games may improve mental health | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it
New video games may improve mental health KING5.com It's an idea that's caught the attention of other mental health professionals as well.

Via Stephen P. Yang, Ph.D.
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Rescooped by Jan Anema from exergames
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The Future of Gaming: a Portrait of the New Gamers

The Future of Gaming: a Portrait of the New Gamers | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it

"The study offers 3 key insights into the evolution of gaming (explained in more detail below):

- Games go beyond the screen

- Life becomes play

- Social matures into societal

 

The study included a Web survey amongst 290 smartphone owners between the ages of 15-54 who self-identified as at least “casual gamers,” with nearly half labeling themselves “game enthusiasts.”"

 

The demographics presented are quite interesting too, because they have a lot in common with the people I'm trying to reach in higher education via distance learning even though it was of smartphone casual gamers.  The other interesting thing to note is how many thought they'd like to see games more applied to education and learning. There's a video portrait of the new gamers embedded in the article.


Via Randall Case, David Spreux
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Rescooped by Jan Anema from eHealth - Social Business in Health
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The Doctor's Office of 2024: 4 Predictions for the Future

The Doctor's Office of 2024: 4 Predictions for the Future | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it

What’s next on the horizon for doctors and patients? Medical experts predict the biggest changes likely to occur in primary care over the next decade.
[...]

- Doctors will rely on Wearbale tech for Real-time Insights..

[...]

- Waiting Rooms will be phased out ..

[...]

- Up to 35 Percent of Visits Will Happen Virtually—Or Not at All

[...]

- Patients Will Increasingly Control Their Medical Charts

[...]

The key for success, Burgert says, is for physicians to push through the learning curve and anxiety associated with many new technologies and be open to the changes that lie ahead. She explains: “Physicians who maintain their willingness to listen and learn, despite the common anxiety of not knowing everything in uncharted territory, will be better positioned in the future.”..


Via rob halkes
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rob halkes's curator insight, July 8, 2014 6:20 AM

In the spirit of the trends, this oversight confirms them. See here and more specifically about what should be the trends here

Interesting ans inspiring however are the data mentioned in the referred studies, from Wolters Kluwer and from Software Advice.

  And surely: health care professionals need to "push through the learning curve.." - Great statement ;-)

See also my next scoop here and here - Thanks!

Rescooped by Jan Anema from Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
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Eight ways the Microsoft Kinect will change healthcare | mobihealthnews

Eight ways the Microsoft Kinect will change healthcare | mobihealthnews | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it

We never really know where the next game-changing innovation will come from. The smartphone started out as just that — a smarter phone. But when Apple opened up its API to developers, that open source project started to unlock the true potential of a handheld, connected touchscreen computer. Nowadays, the ability to make a phone call might just be the least important thing your smartphone does for you.

In the next few years, we might be saying something similar about the Microsoft Kinect, which has a similarly open software development kit. What began as a video game controller is rapidly becoming much more, as developers turn the power of computerized gesture recognition onto a bevy of healthcare uses.

Today, MobiHealthNews launches “Kinect the Docs: How Microsoft’s video game technology is changing healthcare,” a 30-page report on the impact of the technology on the healthcare space. In it, we discuss eight different ways people are already looking into using the Kinect to help people lead healthier lives. Here they are in brief. To get the full report, check out MobiHealthNews’s research store.

1. Fitness and Exergaming

The hands-free, full body control scheme of the Kinect makes it ideal for creating video games that get people active and moving. In addition, the Kinect’s camera can watch you move and record your movements, so it can give feedback on how much you’re moving or whether you’re doing a particular exercise correctly. The gamification possibilities for that kind of instant feedback are extensive, and research work by groups like the Mayo Clinic has shown that exergaming works for seniors as well as younger people.

2. Physical Therapy

The same feedback functionality makes the Kinect an ideal tool for at-home and in-clinic physical therapy. MobiHealthNews wrote about seven startups working in Kinect-based physical therapy in May, including West Health spin-off Reflexion Health and former game developer Respondesign. Many of those startups are now in clinical trials or even launched and working with patients.

3. Surgery Support

One of the very first healthcare use cases attempted even before Microsoft opened up the Kinect SDK was to allow surgeons to access medical imagery like X-rays without scrubbing out or having to work through an assistant. With gesture-based controls, surgeons can not only interact with static medical imagery onscreen, but can even refer to a live-feed from a flouroscopy camera. A Canadian company called GestSure is already deploying the technology in a handful of hospitals.

4. Autism Screening and Therapy

MobiHealthNews recently wrote about a project in development from Kaiser Permanente, using a Kinect game to screen young children for autism spectrum disorders. A study at the University of Minnesota also used Kinect sensors, deployed passively in a nursery, to scope out telltale signs of the condition. And autism centers like the Lakeside Center for Autism in Issaquah, Washington have found the technology just as useful for working with children who are already diagnosed.

5. Virtual Visits and Virtual Nurses

Sense.ly is using the Kinect as an advanced video camera for virtual consultations. The company hopes to reduce the resources hospitals need to commit to following up with chronic disease patients, while still reducing readmissions. The key to that cost saving is a virtual nurse, an avatar that uses Kinect gesture recognition and Nuance voice recognition to communicate with patients just like a human doctor.

6. Virtual Group Therapy

Group therapy can be helpful in the treatment of conditions like alcoholism and PTSD, but people sometimes have a hard time opening themselves up even to strangers. Using the Kinect, groups of patients could meet up virtually and truly anonymously, represented by avatars who would share their voice and body language but without an identifiable face. This technology hasn’t really been realized, but both Microsoft itself and the Pentagon have expressed interest in it.

7. Aging in Place and Fall Prevention

Could a passive Kinect sensor in an elderly person’s home analyze their gait and deliver an early warning about an increase risk of falling? That’s what one startup, Atlas5D is trying to find out. So is a team at the University of Missouri, with backing from the NIH and the NSF. Fall prevention is one of the most elusive goals in mobile health, but the Kinect has shown some promise in tackling it.

8. Helping the Blind to Navigate and the Deaf to Communicate

Researchers have demonstrated the potential of the Kinect to both guide a blind person through a building, and to translate from sign language to text and speech in near-real time. One uses the camera’s ability to detect 3D objects while the other uses the software’s ability to track human hand movements. Both are far from commercialization, but they demonstrate the extraordinary potential of the technology.

Head over to the MobiHealthNews research store to pick up your copy of “Kinect the Docs: How Microsoft’s video game technology is changing healthcare.”


Via Sam Stern, dbtmobile
Jan Anema's insight:

Eight ways the Microsoft Kinect will change healthcare | mobihealthnews

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ExerGame Lab: Exergaming Revolution (infographic)

ExerGame Lab: Exergaming Revolution (infographic) | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it

Exergaming has its critics but it also has its believers. I was passed this infographic (viaHSN) covering some of the studies that show the benefits and effectiveness if using video games for fitness. Did you see your favorite exergame included?


Via Stephen P. Yang, Ph.D.
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Rescooped by Jan Anema from Bewegingsonderwijs
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Gastblog van Linda Duits: Kinderen worden slimmer van de Wii

Gastblog van Linda Duits: Kinderen worden slimmer van de Wii | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it
Terug een gastblog van Linda Duits van Dieponderzoek, volg haar op @dieponderzoek en @lalalalinder.


Exergaming is een samentrekking van de woorden exercise en gaming. Het begrip wordt gebr...

Via Michel Boer
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Eight ways the Microsoft Kinect will change healthcare | mobihealthnews

Eight ways the Microsoft Kinect will change healthcare | mobihealthnews | eSport&eHealthcenter FUN-IE-FIT | Scoop.it

We never really know where the next game-changing innovation will come from. The smartphone started out as just that — a smarter phone. But when Apple opened up its API to developers, that open source project started to unlock the true potential of a handheld, connected touchscreen computer. Nowadays, the ability to make a phone call might just be the least important thing your smartphone does for you.

In the next few years, we might be saying something similar about the Microsoft Kinect, which has a similarly open software development kit. What began as a video game controller is rapidly becoming much more, as developers turn the power of computerized gesture recognition onto a bevy of healthcare uses.

Today, MobiHealthNews launches “Kinect the Docs: How Microsoft’s video game technology is changing healthcare,” a 30-page report on the impact of the technology on the healthcare space. In it, we discuss eight different ways people are already looking into using the Kinect to help people lead healthier lives. Here they are in brief. To get the full report, check out MobiHealthNews’s research store.

1. Fitness and Exergaming

The hands-free, full body control scheme of the Kinect makes it ideal for creating video games that get people active and moving. In addition, the Kinect’s camera can watch you move and record your movements, so it can give feedback on how much you’re moving or whether you’re doing a particular exercise correctly. The gamification possibilities for that kind of instant feedback are extensive, and research work by groups like the Mayo Clinic has shown that exergaming works for seniors as well as younger people.

2. Physical Therapy

The same feedback functionality makes the Kinect an ideal tool for at-home and in-clinic physical therapy. MobiHealthNews wrote about seven startups working in Kinect-based physical therapy in May, including West Health spin-off Reflexion Health and former game developer Respondesign. Many of those startups are now in clinical trials or even launched and working with patients.

3. Surgery Support

One of the very first healthcare use cases attempted even before Microsoft opened up the Kinect SDK was to allow surgeons to access medical imagery like X-rays without scrubbing out or having to work through an assistant. With gesture-based controls, surgeons can not only interact with static medical imagery onscreen, but can even refer to a live-feed from a flouroscopy camera. A Canadian company called GestSure is already deploying the technology in a handful of hospitals.

4. Autism Screening and Therapy

MobiHealthNews recently wrote about a project in development from Kaiser Permanente, using a Kinect game to screen young children for autism spectrum disorders. A study at the University of Minnesota also used Kinect sensors, deployed passively in a nursery, to scope out telltale signs of the condition. And autism centers like the Lakeside Center for Autism in Issaquah, Washington have found the technology just as useful for working with children who are already diagnosed.

5. Virtual Visits and Virtual Nurses

Sense.ly is using the Kinect as an advanced video camera for virtual consultations. The company hopes to reduce the resources hospitals need to commit to following up with chronic disease patients, while still reducing readmissions. The key to that cost saving is a virtual nurse, an avatar that uses Kinect gesture recognition and Nuance voice recognition to communicate with patients just like a human doctor.

6. Virtual Group Therapy

Group therapy can be helpful in the treatment of conditions like alcoholism and PTSD, but people sometimes have a hard time opening themselves up even to strangers. Using the Kinect, groups of patients could meet up virtually and truly anonymously, represented by avatars who would share their voice and body language but without an identifiable face. This technology hasn’t really been realized, but both Microsoft itself and the Pentagon have expressed interest in it.

7. Aging in Place and Fall Prevention

Could a passive Kinect sensor in an elderly person’s home analyze their gait and deliver an early warning about an increase risk of falling? That’s what one startup, Atlas5D is trying to find out. So is a team at the University of Missouri, with backing from the NIH and the NSF. Fall prevention is one of the most elusive goals in mobile health, but the Kinect has shown some promise in tackling it.

8. Helping the Blind to Navigate and the Deaf to Communicate

Researchers have demonstrated the potential of the Kinect to both guide a blind person through a building, and to translate from sign language to text and speech in near-real time. One uses the camera’s ability to detect 3D objects while the other uses the software’s ability to track human hand movements. Both are far from commercialization, but they demonstrate the extraordinary potential of the technology.

Head over to the MobiHealthNews research store to pick up your copy of “Kinect the Docs: How Microsoft’s video game technology is changing healthcare.”


Via Sam Stern, dbtmobile
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Jan Anema's curator insight, July 30, 2015 6:42 AM

Eight ways the Microsoft Kinect will change healthcare | mobihealthnews