Erosion of Cronulla Beach
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Map Maker

Map Maker | Erosion of Cronulla Beach | Scoop.it
Make your own map! 

Via Abigail Rea
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Abigail Rea's curator insight, April 9, 2016 1:56 AM
This resource is a great way to develop students' understanding of places they live in and belong to even further, through using an important geographical tool. After having been introduced to simple maps, such as the 'Take a Trip' game, and familiar places they might identify, students can explore more complex maps with a grid and key. Teachers could introduce what each square in the grid represents in reality, and what the key is useful for. This resource enables students to create their own map of the local area, furthering their understanding of how to represent places in a geographical way.

Teachers could lead into this resource by taking the students for a walk around their local area. Students from Glebe Public School, for example, could walk down Glebe Point Road taking notice of the landmarks they see - houses, shops, parks etc. This way the activity could involve both the "maps" and "fieldwork" (BOSTES NSW, 2016) tools outlined in the syllabus.
 
After creating their map, students could compare theirs with other students' maps of the same local area, and observe where they are the same and where they differ (Taylor et al., 2012). This could be an effective method for self-evaluation and improvement, and targets the syllabus inquiry skills of "Communicating geographical information: present information and reflect on their learning" (BOSTES NSW, 2016).
Hanh Bui's curator insight, April 9, 2016 8:45 AM
This game allows students to investigate features of maps whilst designing their own, using places they are familiar with (ACHGK001) (BOSTES NSW, 2016). This gives students the opportunity to learn through experimentation. 

Teaching ideas: 
• Transfer the game onto laminated paper and create a barrier game, where student A builds their city and student B has to attempt to remake it. Add in some extra icons that are appropriate and relatable to the students and include blank icons so that they can include their own drawings of places. To make it Early Stage 1 appropriate, use a 5x5 or 3x3 grid first. 
 • Another idea: students can be grouped on their locality and work together to create a map of their local area. Students can attempt based off memory first and then use Google Earth/Maps. 

Barrier games encourage positional language and more risk taking, thus making more attempts at achieving the target language as they work with their classmates (Hertzberg and Freeman, 2012). Furthermore, working in pairs and/or small groups allows students the chance to work collaboratively and develop their negotiation and decision-making skills. These activities are particularly supportive for EAL/D learners as it provides more learning opportunities ‘through talk … for affective reasons’ (Hertzberg and Freeman, 2012, p. 53). 

References: 
BOSTES NSW. (2016). NSW Syllabuses for the Australian Curriculum: Geography K-10. Retrieved from http://syllabus.bostes.nsw.edu.au/hsie/geography-k10/ ;

Hertzberg, M. and Freeman, J. (2012). Focus on oracy. In Teaching English language learners in mainstream classes. Marrickville Metro NSW: Primary English Teaching Australia.
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What is coastal erosion?

Coastal erosion is a natural, ongoing process that has been happening for thousands of years. This video explains how it happens and the factors that affect ...
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Education Cartoons - Coastal Processes

This cartoon dives right into coastal processes by looking at the impact of coastal erosion.
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Coastal erosion review nears completion

Coastal erosion review nears completion | Erosion of Cronulla Beach | Scoop.it
News release about coastal erosion review nears completion (19 June, 2014).
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Preventing Coastal Erosion

To review the four different ways that coastal erosion can be prevented.-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/ . Make your own a...
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Rescooped by Natalie Cooke from People Live In Places - Early Stage 1 Geography
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Visit the Torres Strait!

Visit the Torres Strait! | Erosion of Cronulla Beach | Scoop.it

"3000+ educational games, videos and teaching resources for schools and students. Free Primary and Secondary resources covering history, science, English, maths and more"

Link to Video: http://abcspla.sh/m/2182257


Via Andrew Wang
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Andrew Wang's curator insight, April 11, 2016 9:50 AM

This is a great short educational video that is easy to follow for students. This video gives a small overview of the Torres Strait and has a series of interviews with various different children talking about their home, what makes it special and what they love about it (ACHGK003). The video shows some aspects of their daily life, for example how they get to school, and also some things that they think could change to improve living in the Torres Strait (Home, 2016).


This educational video can be used by students to help develop their understanding of the importance of places to people (GEe-1). (NSW Bostes, 2016). Using this video students can investigate and discuss why the Torres Strait is important to its people, how the Torres Strait differs from their own homes and what the similarities are between their homes and the Torres Strait. Students can discuss what the similarities are between them and the children in the video as well as the differences in the geographical structure of their neighbourhood compared to the Torres Strait and what impacts it has on their lifestyles.


This video has been evaluated by using Craven's selection criteria and is appropriate to be used as a learning resource for students. It shows an authentic view of the Torres Strait from current residents and also includes accurate representations of its history (Craven, R., 2015). 


References:


NSW, B. (2016). Geography K–10 :: Early Stage 1 :: People Live in Places. Syllabus.bostes.nsw.edu.au. Retrieved 11 April 2016, from http://syllabus.bostes.nsw.edu.au/hsie/geography-k10/content/1175/


Home. (2016). Splash. Retrieved from http://splash.abc.net.au/home#!/media/2182257/visit-the-torres-strait


Craven, R. (2015). Selection Criteria: Aboriginal Cultural Studies and Aboriginal perspectives across the curriculum. [Handout]. Retrieved from http://libguides.library.usyd.edu.au/content.php?pid=27936&sid=3724909

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Lecture/Presentation: Coastal Erosion, featuring NY Times Science ...

Lecture/Presentation: Coastal Erosion, featuring NY Times Science ... | Erosion of Cronulla Beach | Scoop.it
New York Times science writer Cory Dean joins us for an in-depth and fascinating discussion on a topic that is near and dear to the hearts of many Vineyard residents–coastal erosion. Find out about the shifting sands and ...
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Probabilistic estimation of coastal dune erosion and recession by statistical simulation of storm events

#paper http://t.co/4lSHb9mQr4 Probabilistic estimation of coastal dune erosion and recession by statistical simulation of storm events
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Methods Used to Slow Down Coastal Erosion

This is a video describing the different kinds of methods that are currently used to slow down coastal erosion. Photos by: Tim Norris, Blue Square Thing, Don...
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Coastal Processes and Landforms (excerpt)

This film provides explanations and examples of the processes and landforms of erosion and deposition that shape coastal environments, bringing the subject a...
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Climate change means more storms, more risk of coastal erosion - The Telegram

Climate change means more storms, more risk of coastal erosion - The Telegram | Erosion of Cronulla Beach | Scoop.it
Climate change means more storms, more risk of coastal erosion The Telegram With hurricane Arthur bearing down on Atlantic Canada, Memorial University researcher Norm Catto says it's too late to fix the mistakes of the past, but people should think...
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