How Earth Made Us - Wind
41 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Hannah Burnett
Scoop.it!

Romsey Australia: The great Australian drought.

Romsey Australia: The great Australian drought. | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it
Romsey Australia: The great Australian drought
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Burnett
Scoop.it!

2009 Melbourne Dust Storm

In 2009, a dust storm swept across the Australian states of New South Wales and Queensland from 22 to 24 September. The capital, Canberra, experienced the dust storm on 22 September,[1][2] and on 23 September the storm reached Sydney and Brisbane.

On 23 September, the dust plume measured more than 500 kilometres (310 mi) in width and 1,000 kilometres (620 mi) in length and covered dozens of towns and cities in two states.[3] By 24 September, analysis using MODIS at NASA measured the distance from the northern edge at Cape York to the southern edge of the plume to be 3,450 km.[4]

Air particle concentration levels reached 15,400 micrograms per cubic metre of air. Normal days register up to 20 micrograms and bushfires generate 500 micrograms. This concentration of dust broke records in many towns and cities.[5] The CSIRO estimated that the storm carried some 16 million tonnes of dust from the deserts of Central Australia,[6] and during the peak of the storm, the Australian continent was estimated to be losing 75,000 tonnes of dust per hour off the NSW coast north of Sydney.[7] The dust storm coincided with other extreme weather conditions which affected the cities of Adelaide and Melbourne.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Burnett
Scoop.it!

Dust Storm in Sydney, 2009

September 23, Sydney, Australia. This morning sydneysiders woke to a red haze after strong winds brought large amounts of dust from inland NSW and South Australia

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Burnett
Scoop.it!

The economic impact of the floods and Yasi

As you might expect, Cyclone Yasi will compound the impact of the December and January floods in Queensland.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Burnett
Scoop.it!

Cyclone Yasi destroyed 150 homes - ABC News

Cyclone Yasi destroyed 150 homes - ABC News | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it
Cyclone Yasi destroyed almost 150 homes and left another 650 uninhabitable, preliminary figures show.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Burnett
Scoop.it!

George Hadley

George Hadley (February 12, 1685 – June 28, 1768) was an English lawyer and amateur meteorologist who proposed the atmospheric mechanism by which the Trade Winds are sustained. As a key factor in ensuring that European sailing vessels reached North American shores, understanding the Trade Winds was becoming a matter of great importance at the time. Hadley was intrigued by the fact that winds which should by all rights have blown straight north had a pronounced westerly flow, and it was this mystery he set out to solve.

Hadley was born in London, England to Katherine FitzJames and George Hadley. He had an unremarkable childhood, and was eclipsed in his early years by his older brother John Hadley (1682–1744), the inventor of the octant (a precursor to the sextant). With John and his brother, Henry, George had constructed effective Newtonian telescopes.

George Hadley entered Pembroke College, Oxford, on 30 May 1700, and on 13 August 1701 became a member of Lincoln's Inn, where his father purchased chambers for him. He was called to the bar on 1 July 1709. He remained more interested in mechanical and physical studies than in legal work.[1]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Burnett
Scoop.it!

Climate of Australia

Climate of Australia | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it
Australia is the Driest continent on Earth (if Antarctica is excluded because its millions of tonnes of water are in the form of ice or snow).
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Burnett
Scoop.it!

Tropical Cyclone Trends

Tropical Cyclone Trends | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it
Australian region tropical cyclone warnings, forecasts, seasonal outlooks, cyclone history, climatology and related information
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Burnett
Scoop.it!

Eyewitness News 1983 on Melbourne dust storm & heatwave

aired on channel 10's eyewitness news Melbourne. 8th February 1983. end of the dust storm report and all or most of the Melbourne heatwave report (new record...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Burnett
Scoop.it!

1983 Melbourne Dust Storm

1983 Melbourne Dust Storm | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it
The 1983 Melbourne dust storm occurred 30 years ago on the 8th February. Red soil, dust and sand swept across Victoria and hit Melbourne just before 3pm. The storm was fuelled by high winds and loose topsoil in the Mallee and Wimmera region.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Burnett
Scoop.it!

A year on from Yasi's fury

MARIA Domanti's chest tightens every time a storm brews. When the 86-year-old closes her eyes, she can still hear the wind roaring. She can also hear the deafening bang as the roof of her home is torn away.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Burnett
Scoop.it!

Climate of Australia

The climate of Australia varies widely due to its large geographical size, but by far the largest part of Australia is desert or semi-arid. Only the south-east and south-west corners have a temperate climate and moderately fertile soil. The northern part of the country has a tropical climate, varied between tropical rainforests, grasslands, part desert.

Australia's climate is ruled by the hot, sinking air of the subtropical high pressure belt which moves north and south with the seasons. This causes the rainfall pattern over Australia to be highly seasonal. Australia's rainfall is the lowest of the seven continents (besides Antarctica). Rainfall is variable, with frequent droughts lasting several seasons and is thought to be caused in part by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation.

Since it is a small continent separated from polar regions by the Southern Ocean, Australia does not get the harsh snaps of polar air that swarm over Northern Hemisphere continents during winter. The continents in the Northern Hemisphere have a considerable temperature contrast between summer and winter, whereas in Australia the temperature contrast is small. In many parts of the country, seasonal high and lows can be great with temperatures ranging from above 50 °C (122 °F) to well below zero. Minimum temperatures are moderated by the lack of mountains and the influence of surrounding oceans.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Burnett
Scoop.it!

What is the difference between a hurricane, a cyclone, and a typhoon?

What is the difference between a hurricane, a cyclone, and a typhoon? | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it
Hannah Burnett's insight:

Sometimes it can be very hard to actually tell the difference...

more...
BSCBRA0047's comment, August 1, 2013 7:28 PM
I had no idea there was a difference! Thanks for sharing this informative article.
Scooped by Hannah Burnett
Scoop.it!

Why Does Earth Have Deserts?

Subscribe to MinuteEarth - it's FREE! - http://dft.ba/-minuteearth_sub Why Does Earth Have Deserts? For the same reason it has Rainforests: Hadley Cells!!! T...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Burnett
Scoop.it!

Cyclone Yasi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi /ˈjɑːs/ was a powerful tropical cyclone that made landfall in northern Queensland, Australia in the early hours of 3 February, 2011, causing severe damage to affected areas. Yasi originated from a tropical low near Fiji. The system intensified to a Category 3 cyclone at about 5 p.m. AEST (07:00 UTC) on 31 January 2011.[1] Late on 1 February the cyclone strengthened to a Category 4 system, then early on 2 February, the cyclone intensified to a Category 5 system.[2]

According to Tropical Cyclone Advice Number 21, at 9pm AEST (11:00 UTC) the system was centred near 17°24′00″S 147°06′00″E / 17.40000°S 147.10000°E / -17.40000; 147.10000, "110 kilometres east of Innisfail and moving west southwest at 25 kilometres per hour," with a central pressure of 930 mbar (27 inHg).[3] The system had a well-defined eye and a dvorak intensity of T6.5.[4]

According to Tropical Cyclone Advice Number 24 at 11:54pm AEST (13:54 UTC), the large destructive core had commenced to cross the coast between Innisfail and Cardwell with a central pressure of 930 hectopascals and maximum 10-minute sustained winds of 215 km/h. Maximum 3-second gusts are estimated at 285 km/h, with these likely to affect an area spanning from Ingham to Cairns according to the Threat Map [5] for a period of 3–4 hours. The eye crossed the coastline at Mission Beach just before 12:00am AEST (14:00 UTC) and passed over Tully soon after.

more...
No comment yet.