Environments- natural, built and heritage features
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Environments- natural, built and heritage features
Natural, built and heritage features in the immediate environment and other areas.
ENS1.5 Compares and contrasts natural and built features in their local area and the ways in which people interact with these features.
Curated by Rosalind Lee
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Virtual Tour of Sydney Opera House, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia by Panedia

Virtual Tour of Sydney Opera House, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia by Panedia | Environments- natural, built and heritage features | Scoop.it
7000+ Australia virtual tours on maps in very high resolution + London virtual tours, Japan virtual tours & California virtual tours
Rosalind Lee's insight:

Panedia- Sydney Opera House and Circular Quay. 

 

This website offers virtual tours of the Opera House and Circular Quay, as well as other significant land marks and environments around Sydney. You can change the view from panorama to see whole areas on a map from birds’ eye view. The company seeks to combine panoramic visuals and information into an archive of our changing environments.

This website provides access to various locations which may not be accessible to students in different parts of Australia.

These images provide examples of different natural and built environments, including heritage environments.

 

 

Teaching Idea

 

Take students on a virtual tour of Circular Quay and The Opera House. Discuss some of the images (What features can you see? Are these places natural of built environments?)

(If possible you may wish to organise an excursion to Circular Quay and The Opera House to explore the local environment). Get the students to draw/record some of the natural, built and heritage features. Tell students about the history of The Opera House and its role as an iconic building in Australia’s history and it’s standing as a heritage site. Discuss what the building was/is used for and when was it built? /what is the purpose of the building today? / etc. Explore what the natural environment might have looked like before the building was built. These images can be found here as well as a timeline surrounding the construction of the Opera House: http://theoperahouseproject.com/ (if being completed as a unit, I would suggest using this website as a great information source aswell). 

Discuss how and why the natural environment has been changed. List possible reasons for these changes (growth and development, technology, human impact, etc). Develop a table with students, which contains information about different sites from the area, e.g. name of site and location, why the site is important, purpose (buildings- theatre, bridge, parks, etc), infrastructure (roads), natural environment (water, gardens), etc.

Identify together what environmental sites might need to be preserved or protected (water pollution, run off, littering). Get students to organise these sites in order of importance (will be individual). Together compare results of how students ranked the importance of various places in our environment (raises students’ awareness of how people values environments differently).

You may wish to tally results into a table so the students can compare and discuss how people value their changing environment differently.

 

Assessment

 

Students actively participate in exploring and making comparisons about the natural and built environments. Make observations if they can gather information to put into a table about the local area and its features. Students form an opinion about the local area and what it means to them (the importance of particular places or features).

 

Literacy/Numeracy Link

 

Interprets information presented in images and diagrams, selects texts related to the topic. Students may also represent the tally in the form of a column graph or similar (numeracy). 

 

Reference

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R.R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M., (2010). Literacy- Reading, Writing and Children's Literature. 4th Edition. Chapter 21. Oxford University Press, Australia and New Zealand.

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MapMaker Interactive

Use our tools to explore the world, learn about human and physical patterns, and make your own maps.
Rosalind Lee's insight:

Map Maker (Global Perspective)-

 

This website is a useful tool from National Geographic, that provides you access to a number of maps of the Earth and of individual countries. It offers various themes as a way of exploring different elements of a map. You can zoom in (to a degree) and view maps of individual countries or of the world.  Allowing children to explore the similarities and differences of countries from around the globe allows students to view their environment from a global perspective and as part of a wider environment. 


Teaching Idea


Discuss what a map is and what it can represent e.g. different types of maps can represent different things e.g. a bird’s eye view. Describe how symbols and different colours can represent places and features on a map.

Show students a world map on the site and identify landmasses, seas, north/south poles, Australia and own town or city. Develop students understanding of the way a three dimensional landscape is represented in two dimensions using lines, colours and symbols. Identify some of the countries that students of your class come from, or have been to. 

Locate Australia on the map (you can also access a map of Australia only for more detail). Get your students to choose another country to investigate as well (perhaps China where you can later introduce topic of the important political relationship between Australia and China). Make observations about the two different counties noting similarities and differences (different hemispheres, size, surrounded by water (island), surrounded by countries). Provide students a map of Australia and discuss what the symbols and colours on the map represent and why they are used. Use the Map Maker to have a closer look at Australia and prompt students’ observations of the map to locate and identify the names of various geographical features, such as mountains, rivers, and cities.

 

Assessment

 

Each student draws a freehand map of the location they have studied, using some symbols and a simple keys to represent different features on their map. Ask students to explain some of the symbols they have used and what they represent.

Note that students should represent the location as a bird's eye view. No aspects of the map should be draw as a perspective.

 

Literacy/ Numeracy link

 

Student labels own maps using technical language and other organisers. There is also a numeracy link where students describe the position of places on a simple map. 

 

References

 

Hadjerrouit, S., (2010). Developing Web-Based Learning Resources in School Education: A User-Centered Approach, Retrieved April 20 2013 from http://www.ijello.org/Volume6/IJELLOv6p115-135Hadjerrouit688.pdf

 

Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian schools (2011), Retrieved April 20 2013 from http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/verve/_resources/GPS_web.pdf

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Google Earth

Google Earth | Environments- natural, built and heritage features | Scoop.it
Google Earth lets you fly anywhere on Earth to view satellite imagery, maps, terrain, 3D buildings, from galaxies in outer space to the canyons of the ocean. You can explore rich geographical content, save your toured places, and share with others.
Rosalind Lee's insight:

Google Earth

 

Google Earth is an interactive website where students can explore the Earth and develop an understanding of their locan neighbourhood as par of a wider environment. They are also able to observe that environments have features that are natural, managed and built.

 

Teaching Idea

 

Exploring local environment- ‘My Neighbourhood’

Use Google Earth with students as they pretend they are aliens or spacemen and journey from outer space to visit some different locations in the school neighbourhood. They do this by inserting an address in the Search function in the side menu. The Teacher will have to outline the simple steps on how to use Google Earth or explore this website together by using the SMARTBoard.

 

Using the ‘street view’ option in Google Earth students journey into streets and talk about features of the different places/locations around the school. Ask them to identify natural features of the school neighbourhood and features that are built by people. Make a list of on the board. Take the students into the playground and say that you are now going to observe some environmental features in real life. Review the meaning of the word ‘environment’ as a place or a space. Identify the differences between natural and built features in the environment. Find a safe spot in the playground to sit and observe things such as the trees, hill, creek, and school buildings, boundary fences. Identify the compass points of north, south, east and west and draw or indicate on the playground floor. Introduce location words e.g. ‘behind’, ‘in front’, ‘up’, ‘down’, ‘below’, ‘above’, ‘between’, ‘next to’. In pairs get the students to identify different environmental features using appropriate vocabulary, e.g. a large building to the right or east / west, what is it?

Ask students to identify whether the area is natural or built and the areas purpose.

Divide the class into small groups and assign each group a different area of the school. Ask students to imagine they are a bird looking down on the area.Have each group draw a plan of their assigned area and label their section of the school.On a large sheet of butchers paper construct a map of the school from the students’ drawings/plans.

 

Assessment

 

Each student correctly identifies and labels features of their given area of the school. Student’s maps contain correct symbols and vocabulary as used throughout lesson.

 

Literacy link

 

Students use vocabulary to label map and technical language. Descriptive language is also used to describe the natural and built features of the environment.

 

References

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society and its Environment K-6 syllabus. Sydney, Australia; Board of Studies NSW, Retrieved April 19 2013 from  http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/go/hsie

 

Laurillard, D. Learning Formal Representations through Multimedia. Retrieved April 19, 2013. http://www.etl.tla.ed.ac.uk/docs/ExperienceofLearning/EoL11.pdf

 

McInerney, D., & McInerney, V. (2010). Educational psychology: Constructing Learning, 5th ed. Chapter 8. Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Australia

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Twelve Canoes

12 Canoes is a broadband website presenting, in an artistic, cultural and educational context, the stories, art and environment of the Yolngu people who live around the Arafura swamp in north-eastern Arnhem Land.
Rosalind Lee's insight:

Twelve Canoes (Indigenous perspective) -

 

Twelve Canoes is a website that was created to share the stories, art and environment of the Yolngu people who live around the Arafura swamp in north-eastern Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory. The website was created from the collaboration between a filmmaker and the Indigenous Yolngu people of Ramingining and consists of twelve audio- visual pieces about key subjects that deal with particular aspects of the Yolngu culture, place or history. The website is a beautiful insight into the culture and lands of the Yolngu people and offers a medium through which to glimpse elements of their culture from the Indigenous perspective.

The website was evaluated by its authenticity (created in collaboration with the Yolngu people), balanced nature of the presentation (provides various representations of the Aboriginal people), Aboriginal participation (role in creating this site) and its accuracy and reliability. The website also has a study guide that was created in association with the site and can be found here - http://12canoes.com.au/downloads/studyguide/Twelve_Canoes_Study_Guide.pdf

 

Teaching Idea

 

Identify any native animals that live, or have lived, in the local area. What were some of the animals seen or mentioned in the video? (Look at the artwork used to introduce this segment- what animals can you see?). Students may complete a table of the animals (categorise into land, air and water). Students can gather more information about the animals’ food(s), habitats, environmental issues, etc. You then can introduce and discuss appropriate local issues, based on the information gathered, e.g. What are some of the issues mentioned in the video? (Laws about fishing and killing crocodiles), What changes have happened to impact on the animal population? (New plant species). Have any animals disappeared from the local area? Are they safe in the new environment? (Imbalance of predators). Students become familiar with the changes that have occurred in this environment over time.

Compare and contrast student and Aboriginal views of the animals. You may use a range of text types to do this such as the artwork featured at the introduction of the segment, a local Dreamtime story (with permission), and European stories, songs or films about native animals (Possum Magic).

You may wish to conclude with inviting a range of people to talk to the class about the care and management of natural environments (Aboriginal Elder, Aboriginal Land Council, Parks and Wildlife Officer, Greenpeace, etc).  

 

Assessment

 

Check for comprehension where students are able to observe and list animals featured in the video (described or shown) and correctly categorise them. Students offer relevant suggestions based on information gathered. Students are able to compare and offer their own views on animals with the ones depicted in the video. Listens to and talks about features of the local area and animals from Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal perspectives.

 

Literacy Link

 

As students view the video there is an opportunity to reinforce important vocabulary. Students also get an opportunity to experience different electronic literacies (video and audio) and develop their concept of writing in multimodal formats.

 

References.

 

Aboriginal Cultural Protocols and Practices Policy, Retrieved April 20 2013 from
http://www.dpc.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0016/781/Indigenous_Ceremony.pdf

 

NSW AECG & NSW DET  (2004) The Report of the Review of Aboriginal Education, Retrieved April 20 2013 from https://www.det.nsw.edu.au/media/downloads/reviews/aboriginaledu/report/aer2003_04.pdf

 

Working with Aboriginal People and Communities, Retrieved April 20 2013 from

http://www.community.nsw.gov.au/docswr/_assets/main/documents/working_with_aboriginal.pdf

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One Million Reasons to Save The Reef

One Million Reasons to Save The Reef | Environments- natural, built and heritage features | Scoop.it
One Million Reasons to Save The Reef by Greenpeace Australia Pacific
Rosalind Lee's insight:

Great Barrier Reef- One million reasons to save the reef

 

This website was made by Greenpeace about the dangers the Great Barrier Reef is facing because of the Coal industry. The main allure of the website is a place where people (students) can go and post their own individual reason to save the Reef. There are information links and video clips about what is happening at and around Curtis Island and the implications this is having on the reef environment. The website provides links for further information.

 

Teaching Idea

 

For students who are unfamiliar with the Great Barrier Reef you may wish to use this website in association with this video clip about the Great Barrier Reef by National Geographic- http://video.nationalgeographic.com.au/video/places/parks-and-nature-places/oceans/oceans-barrier-reef/

Discuss why the Great Barrier Reef is an important place (natural, heritage environment). List ideas on the board (as a mind map or similar). Students categorise (draw or write) the information and ideas into a ‘Needs and Wants’ chart (some ideas may suggested from the video clip or some of the reasons listed by other students on the website). Use probing questions such as ‘What needs does the reef provide (habitat for endangered animals, coral, fishing, etc)?’ and ‘What may some people want to do with the Reef (coal industry, dredging, pollution, climate change, etc)?'

In groups, students identify an important reason to save the Reef, based on relevant information discussed in class. Students work together to write their reason and share it with the class. Students are able to post their reason on the website to be shared with a world wide audience.

 

Teachers may wish to highlight some of the more appropriate reasons listed on the website and over see student viewing of it. 

 

Assessment

 

Students can organise ideas in correct manner, according to task. They gather and use information from various sources to express an opinion or understanding about the heritage environment. Check each students spelling and grammar prior to final reason being posted on the website.

 

Literacy link

 

Students develop writing skills to convey whole ideas in short sentences. Student grammar and spelling in this multimodal format is important as in other text types.

 

Reference

 

Muir, D.J., Adapting Online Education to Different Learning Styles. Retrieved April 20 from

http://cursa.ihmc.us/rid=1150206513795_1809968232_7271/learning%20styles%20article.pdf

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