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Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News: Ammonia threatens national parks

Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News: Ammonia threatens national parks | Environmental Science | Scoop.it
Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News
Aaiz Zawawi's insight:

Scientist at Harvard University are concerned over the ammonia emissions.  85 percent, of nitrogen deposition originates with human activities. The  air quality regulation and continuing development of clean energy technology are expected to reduce the amount of harmful nitrogen oxides released by coal plants and cars over time. Sadly no government regulations currently limit the amount of ammonia  that enters the atmosphere through agricultural fertilization or manure from animal cultivation which are now responsible for one-third of the anthropogenic nitrogen carried on air currents and deposited on land. What is shocking is that only about 10 percent of the nitrogen makes it into the food the rest escapes, and most of it escapes through the atmosphere.

 
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China at Crossroads: Balancing The Economy and Environment

China at Crossroads: Balancing The Economy and Environment | Environmental Science | Scoop.it
After three decades of unbridled economic growth and mounting ecological problems, China and its new leadership face a key challenge: cleaning up the dirty air, polluted water, and tainted food supplies that are fueling widespread discontent among...
Aaiz Zawawi's insight:

Today, China has became one of the super power of the world, possessing one of the largest economy. With a vast economy, comes with an environmental damage. The chinese citizens living in Beijing were not happy with the government due to their insufficient acts upon the poor air quality. Due to the government's ruling Communist party's believe in GDP growth, not much actions can be taken.

 

China was a place I once called "home" for nearly three years of my life. My experience living in China was unforgettable although during my father's tenure as a diplomat lasted only for a short while. Back then, the air quality in Shanghai (where I was living) was already suffering from the effect of releasing too much carbon dioxide. The Yangtze River, longest river in Chana that flows through Shanghai was suffering from heavy environmental damage due to the fact that it being used to transport massive cargo ships 

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