Environmental management (and problems) of Japan
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IAEA starts review at Fukushima

IAEA starts review at Fukushima | Environmental management (and problems) of Japan | Scoop.it
A team of experts formed by the International Atomic Energy Agency began Monday reviewing Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s ongoing efforts to scrap the crippled reactors at its Fukushima No. 1 ...
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Anti-nuclear campaigners launch Japan's first green party

Anti-nuclear campaigners launch Japan's first green party | Environmental management (and problems) of Japan | Scoop.it
Greens Japan promises voters to put environment first and abolish nuclear power plants
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Slippery clay major cause of tsunami

Slippery clay major cause of tsunami | Environmental management (and problems) of Japan | Scoop.it
Slippery clay at a Pacific seabed fault near the Japan Trench was a major cause of the tsunami created by the March 11, 2011, earthquake, an international research team said. ...
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According to researchers from the Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, the tectonic plate's edge consists mostly of clay and is only up to 5 meters thick, which became slippery as water inside it expanded from friction caused by the quake. They say this is the major cause of the tsunami of March 11th, 2011. (First published in the U.S. journal Science)

 

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Radiation in rainwater overflow spikes at No. 1

Radiation in rainwater overflow spikes at No. 1 | Environmental management (and problems) of Japan | Scoop.it
Rainwater that overflowed Sunday from the concrete-ringed enclosures around the water storage tanks at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant had excessively high radiation readings, Tokyo Electric Power Co.
Eveline Punie's insight:

How is the government planning to (help) solve the problem though?

 

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New Green Party formed in Japan |

New Green Party formed in Japan | | Environmental management (and problems) of Japan | Scoop.it
Eveline Punie's insight:

A lot of info over the Green Party, including a summary of its origins and election prospects, is quite usefull as background knowledge.

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Bullet trains on a pro-nuclear curve

Bullet trains on a pro-nuclear curve | Environmental management (and problems) of Japan | Scoop.it
In the debate over the future of nuclear power, which provided about a third of Japan's electricity needs before the Fukushima disaster began in 2011, commentators for and against resuming ...
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NHK WORLD English

NHK WORLD English | Environmental management (and problems) of Japan | Scoop.it
NHK WORLD is the international broadcasting service of NHK.
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After the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster, it was thought that most of fallout in had ended up in the ocean. But now it seems like the radioactivity in the sea is less than previously thought. It is possible that most of the radioactive particles have dispersed.

 

Recently, the 20km off-limits zone for ships was also brought back to a zone of 5km by 5km around Fukushima Daiichi. Still, fish with radioactivity measurements above government safety limits are being found in waters near the plant. As a consequence, fishing is still restricted.

 

Researchers from the US and Japan are now doing tests to determine the possible causes for the radioactivity in the water and fish. They have done several surveys, for example on plankton (to determine the possibility of radioactivity spreading through the foodchain), mud from the seabottom and groundwater (which was searched for the radioactive element radion).

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No-go zone cleanup way behind schedule

No-go zone cleanup way behind schedule | Environmental management (and problems) of Japan | Scoop.it
Radiation cleanup in some of the most contaminated towns around the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant is far behind schedule, so residents will have to wait a few more years ...
Eveline Punie's insight:

The cleanup of the regions around Fukushima is behind schedule because of various problems with the decontamination, though visits are allowed. It may be more important to guarantee the safety of the inhabitants, but the government still hasn't decided how much longer they want to extend the cleanup period, which could cause problems later. It seems better to set concrete goals from the start and stick to them as much as possible.

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No. 1 water woes laid to Tepco's ineptitude

No. 1 water woes laid to Tepco's ineptitude | Environmental management (and problems) of Japan | Scoop.it
Two and a half years after the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant experienced its three reactor-core meltdowns, efforts to clean up what remains of the complex is turning into another ...
Eveline Punie's insight:

Some of the possible solutions seem a bit impractical or hard to execute (underwater wall). The government itself doesn't seem to be taking a lot of initiative in the decommisioning. This article gives the impression that Tepco is more concerned about saving money than solving the leakage-problems.

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Japan's first green party formed by anti-nuclear movement

Japan's first green party formed by anti-nuclear movement | Environmental management (and problems) of Japan | Scoop.it
With the ongoing protests in Tokyo against the government and its return to using nuclear power, Japan's anti-nuclear movement has now grown large enough to establish the nation's first green polit...
Eveline Punie's insight:

A good initiative, but it might be a bit difficult to get votes at first. And even if they do manage to get enough votes; how much will they be able to change with their rather limited amount of members? Can they have enough influence?

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