Remote Sensing
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The Chemicals Behind the Colours of Autumn Leaves

The Chemicals Behind the Colours of Autumn Leaves | Remote Sensing | Scoop.it
With autumn looming on the horizon, the leaves on some trees have already begun the transition towards the vibrant hues of autumn. Whilst this change may outwardly seem like a simple one, the many vivid colours are a result of a range of chemical compounds, a selection of which are detailed here.Before discussing the different
Karen Joyce's insight:

We might not see the same seasonal colours in northern Australia, but it's still instructive to see just how chemistry affects what we see

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Catalyst: Fundamentals with Bernie Hobbs: Darker When Wet - ABC TV Science

Catalyst: Fundamentals with Bernie Hobbs: Darker When Wet - ABC TV Science | Remote Sensing | Scoop.it
All great discoveries in science begin with somebody asking a question Newton asked “Why do things fall to the ground?” Darwin asked “How did we end up as we are?” And Bernie Hobbs isn’t afraid to
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Tina's comment, March 16, 2014 7:54 PM
Things looks darker when they're wet as the H2O molecules are mixed with the object that gets wet. This means that the light beams travel further into an object because they are using the water molecules as a pathway. Because of this the light beams are better absorbed and therefore take longer to reflect, appearing darker to the eye.
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BRDF Explained - University of Massachusetts Boston

BRDF Explained - University of Massachusetts Boston | Remote Sensing | Scoop.it
The oceanfront campus is minutes from downtown Boston and nationally recognized as a student-centered urban public research university.
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Jenni's comment, March 9, 2014 10:42 PM
BRDF returns the reflectance of a target as a function of illumination geometry (the angle of light hitting the object or land surface) and the viewing geometry (the angle of the sensor taking the picture). In remote sensing BRDF is used for many things (see this article) including the corrections of view and illumination angle effects. This is particularly useful with image standardisation and mosaicing. BRDF put simply describes how objects look different when viewed from different angles and with light hitting the object at different levels. Two examples are; when looking on the water, 1) looking in to the sun you see lots of glare shining into your eyes, turn the other way and the water and sunlight is all the same but your viewing angle is different and hopefully more comfortable, 2) Karen's example was of a mown lawn, cricket ground where you can see 'lines' that show where the grass was mown. as the grass is bent different angles, the lights hit the grass differently and the 'lines' of mowing appear.
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How we see color - Colm Kelleher

How we see color - Colm Kelleher | Remote Sensing | Scoop.it
There are three types of color receptors in your eye: red, green and blue. But how do we see the amazing kaleidoscope of other colors that make up our world? Colm Kelleher explains how humans can see everything from auburn to aquamarine.
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Patrice Weber's comment, March 9, 2014 8:07 PM
We see colour by combining the signals given by the three primary colours (Red Green and Blue) cone receptors present on our retina.
Patrice Weber's comment, March 9, 2014 8:10 PM
Any visible wavelength will excite a combination of cone receptors as to render the corresponding colour in our brain
ROBIN LUNGELI MAGAR's comment, March 9, 2014 8:12 PM
combination of three color blue, green, red by three cones.
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A trip to the Land of the Magic Windows :: NASA's The Space Place

A trip to the Land of the Magic Windows :: NASA's The Space Place | Remote Sensing | Scoop.it
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Lucy Evans's comment, March 9, 2014 8:11 PM
*390-700 nanometres
Ann Grattidge's comment, March 14, 2014 8:11 AM
Interesting - windows on the universe - according to the different electromagnetic radiation energies. we know very little about gamma rays and where they come from.
Xin Li's curator insight, March 16, 2014 10:13 PM

There are several windows of wavelength for people to detect radiations from space. For example, gamma radiation is emitted by black holes and  supernova etc and has very high energy. Measuring the radiation with different wavelength from space would give us a better understanding of the universe.

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Light waves, visible and invisible - Lucianne Walkowicz

Light waves, visible and invisible - Lucianne Walkowicz | Remote Sensing | Scoop.it
Each kind of light has a unique wavelength, but human eyes can only perceive a tiny slice of the full spectrum -- the very narrow range from red to violet. Microwaves, radio waves, x-rays and more are hiding, invisible, just beyond our perception. Lucianne Walkowicz shows us the waves we can’t see.
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What is color? - Colm Kelleher

What is color? - Colm Kelleher | Remote Sensing | Scoop.it
Have you ever wondered what color is? In this first installment of a series on light, Colm Kelleher describes the physics behind colors-- why the colors we see are related to the period of motion and the frequency of waves.
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Malcolm Hauser's comment, March 9, 2014 8:12 PM
Color is in actual fact how we describe different wavelengths. An object will reflect particular wavelengths more readily and absorbs others. The properties of an object is a reflection of that particular wavelength.
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Landsat 8 Delivering On Its Promises : Feature Articles

Landsat 8 Delivering On Its Promises : Feature Articles | Remote Sensing | Scoop.it
It was built to extend a four-decade record of Earth observations. One year after launch, Landsat 8 has deepened the archives and our insights — not just of the land, but of the sea and sky. Here are some of our favorite images to date.
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Jess Harris's comment, March 9, 2014 8:08 PM
Very pretty pictures, looks like true colour as well as infrared images taken from Landset 8. They appear to be used to observe changes/ developments over time.
Ann Grattidge's comment, March 14, 2014 7:57 AM
This site has a lot of information. There are a broad range of Landsat images covering a variety of contexts from glacial, to coastal, agricultural areas, significant national parks, cities. and volcanic eruptions. For each image there is some explanation of the application of the Landsat imagery and the bands used to compile the image. There is a bit of a history of the various Landsat satellites. Landsat 5 has hung in there since the 1980's and was only recently turned off - well that was a good investment. You can also explore some of the terminology through the links. A good site for a general overview.
Barbara Bernal's comment, March 16, 2014 9:33 PM
by looking at images from the Landsat 8 a lot can be understood. For example with the death valley image, the Landsat was able to measure high temperatures on the ground. Conversely, the picture of the fault and rocks, shows the detection of different geogical features and histories.
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Why is glass transparent? - Mark Miodownik

Why is glass transparent? - Mark Miodownik | Remote Sensing | Scoop.it
If you look through your glasses, binoculars or a window, you see the world on the other side. How is it that something so solid can be so invisible? Mark Miodownik melts the scientific secret behind amorphous solids.
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Barbara Bernal's comment, March 9, 2014 8:11 PM
The glass is transparent because the light does not provide enough energy for the electrons to cross rows. Ultraviolet light does provide enough energy for this to happen.
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Why the mantis shrimp is my new favorite animal - The Oatmeal

Why the mantis shrimp is my new favorite animal - The Oatmeal | Remote Sensing | Scoop.it
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Uyen Nguyen's comment, March 9, 2014 8:12 PM
yes the mantis is pretty cool. It does highlight that humans are seeing the world through a limited vision range with only three main colours. The mantis has 16.
Emma Graham's comment, March 16, 2014 7:58 PM
The mantis shrimp is awesome!!! It can see amazing things, and do amazingly weird things to kill its preys!! Wish I could see rainbows the way the mantis shrimp can!!!
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Cool Cosmos

Cool Cosmos | Remote Sensing | Scoop.it
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Patrice Weber's comment, March 16, 2014 7:54 PM
The topic is about infrared atmospheric windows. Interresting that the atmosphere heat content radiates mostly around 10 microns.
Patrice Weber's comment, March 16, 2014 7:56 PM
Most of the infrared light coming from space is blocked, if it were not for small narrow windows.
Ann Grattidge's comment, March 16, 2014 9:39 PM
Atmospheric windows are areas in the ERM spectrum for which interference /absorbance by the atmosphere is minimal and therefore infra red astronomers can make reasonable observations of objects outside of our atmosphere.
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Why is the sky blue? :: NASA's The Space Place

Why is the sky blue? :: NASA's The Space Place | Remote Sensing | Scoop.it
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Stephanie de Buhr's comment, March 16, 2014 7:54 PM
Sunlight travels through the atmosphere, where it is scattered by gas molecules. Blue light is scattered more than other colours due to its shorter wavelength. Hence we see the sky as blue.