Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Une ferme d'insectes sur le point d'éclore

Une ferme d'insectes sur le point d'éclore | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
AGRICULTURE. Un élevage particulier verra le jour sous peu à Frelighsburg. Deux associés, Nabil Chaib Draa et Étienne Normandin, en sont à mettre sur pied une ferme d'insectes, dans une ancienne écurie à l'orée du village, a appris JournalLeGuide.com. Et les plans liés à l'entomophagie, l'intégration des insectes dans l'alimentation humaine, ne manquent pas pour les deux entrepreneurs.
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Former UN Chief: Americans Should Eat Insects to Fight Global Warming

Former UN Chief: Americans Should Eat Insects to Fight Global Warming | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Marie Antoinette may or may not have said “Let them eat cake” at the outset of the French Revolution 200-plus years ago, but former United Nations General Secretary Kofi Annan just made Marie Antoinette’s alleged dictate seem downright magnanimous. Pointing his finger at America and other Western democracies, Annan this week said Americans should begin eating insects to do our part to address the fictitious global warming crisis.

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Cooking with the Bug Chef - YouTube

Cooking with the Bug Chef - YouTube | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

We follow David George Gordon, aka the Bug Chef, as he prepares a variety of insects for the Explorers' Club's most ambitious dinner yet. For more videos, su...

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Edible Cricket Farm Sets Up Shop In Van Nuys

Edible Cricket Farm Sets Up Shop In Van Nuys | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Coalo Valley Farms is cultivating crickets to make into a protein food supplement. Kaj Goldberg reports.

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Notes from the Bug Revolution !

Notes from the Bug Revolution ! | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Starting a business is never easy, but when your business model is based upon changing an entire food culture you have a few extra challenges. The funny thing is that actually convincing people to eat bugs is not the hard part − the hard part is convincing skeptics that you are able to get people to eat bugs. Is this just a passing fad or is America really ready to embrace entomophagy (eating insects)?

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Oregon Business Serves Up Crickets As A Food Choice

Oregon Business Serves Up Crickets As A Food Choice | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Of all the things you're considering for your next meal today, bugs are probably not on the menu. 


Ana C. Day's insight:

"The company's name is Cricket Flours. Founder and CEO Charles Wilson said he got interested in crickets as a protein supplement when he found out he had food sensitivities to dairy, gluten and a bunch of other ingredients."

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Forests could be the trump card in efforts to end global hunger, report says

Forests could be the trump card in efforts to end global hunger, report says | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
About one in nine people globally still suffer from hunger with the majority of the hungry living in Africa and Asia. The world's forests have great potential to improve their nutrition and ensure their livelihoods. In fact, forests and forestry are essential to achieve food security as the limits of ...
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Mmmm, Crickets: How Exo Protein Bars Found Its Wings

Mmmm, Crickets: How Exo Protein Bars Found Its Wings | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Two entrepreneurs are singing the praises of cricket-based protein bars.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"After a few months of selling handmade bars packaged in sandwich bags, Sewitz and Lewis made their business official. They launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund their first manufacturing run and reached their $20,000 goal in less than 72 hours; the 30-day campaign raised a total of $54,911. Exo launched in 2014."

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Eating Bugs Has Never Been More Popular, But Will It Ever Go Mainstream?

Eating Bugs Has Never Been More Popular, But Will It Ever Go Mainstream? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A future in which cricket chips could be found on the shelves of an American grocery store next to their potato- and corn-based peers might not be that far off -- or at least that’s the hope of
Ana C. Day's insight:

"So, what's the holdup in the Western world? A new paper published in the journal Food Quality and Preference argued that current strategies to focus on insects’ environmental and nutritional benefits are falling short. Instead, the authors suggest, the insects should not be treated as something that must be "hidden" and should also be presented in a way that's pleasing to all the senses -- as all food should be."

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Bugs may solve food sustainability problems

Bugs may solve food sustainability problems | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
While many people search for a solution to a pestering insect problem, Kenzie Wade, junior in anthropology, looks at insects as the solution to a more complex problem. Wade said she saw the crawling creatures as exciting opportunities. She said she hoped to transform her bug-eating school project into a growing business.

“I would like to bring food sustainability to cultural preservation,” Wade said.

According to Wade, she had to choose a topic and write a blog from her environmental anthropology class. Wade used the assignment to pursue her interest in food sustainability by eating insects, or entomophagy.
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Global Pestaurant Event | 3 June 2015 | Rentokil - YouTube

On the 3rd June 2015 Global Pestaurant is back! Pop-up Pestaurants will appear across the Globe, offering sweet and savoury edible insects, BBQ's, and much m...
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The psychology of eating insects: A cross-cultural comparison between Germany and China

The psychology of eating insects: A cross-cultural comparison between Germany and China | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

The Chinese have more favourable attitudes toward insects as food.

The Chinese reported a higher willingness to eat insects compared to the Germans.

The Germans were more willing to eat processed compared to unprocessed insects.

The impact of food neophobia on the willingness to eat insects was equally high in both countries.

Ana C. Day's insight:
Abstract

Based on their high nutritional value and low production costs, insects are an excellent and sustainable source of animal protein. In contrast to countries such as China, in western societies, the consumption of insects is not rooted in traditional diet. Data for the present study was collected from adults in Germany (n=502) and China (n=443). A cross-cultural comparison was conducted based on consumers’ willingness to eat different insect-based, processed (e.g., cookies based on cricket flour) and unprocessed (e.g., crickets) food. The influence of food neophobia on consumers’ willingness to eat insects was examined. The Chinese rated all insect-based food more favourably with regard to taste, nutritional value, familiarity and social acceptance compared with the Germans. Also, they indicated greater willingness to eat the tested food products, and no differences were observed between their ratings of processed and unprocessed food. The Germans reported higher willingness to eat the processed insect-based foods compared to the unprocessed foods. Further results revealed that low scores for food neophobia, positive taste expectations, high scores for social acceptance and experiences with eating insects in the past were significant predictors of consumers’ willingness to eat insects in both countries. Consequently, the introduction of insects as a food source in Western societies seems more likely to succeed if insects are incorporated into familiar food items, which will reduce neophobic reactions and negative attitudes towards insect-based foods.

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A newcomer's guide to edible bugs

A newcomer's guide to edible bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
They're packed with protein and can taste pretty delicious. Here are some bugs worth biting.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Many different species of insects are eaten around the world, but in Western countries, we’re still generally grossed out at the thought. A report released by the United Nations in 2013 encouraged people to eat more insects. That’s because insects are rich in protein, and farming of insects has a much lower environmental footprint than cattle, for instance. So what’s best to try if you’re an insect-eating newbie? We’re to help you figure out which insects can be quite delicious, and which you can leave for the birds (literally)."

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Start Eating Bugs; Insects: The Protein of The Future - YouTube

Valhalla Movement
Ana C. Day's insight:

Published on May 7, 2015

Marty stumbles on an Insect Tasting! 

Throw a Like to The Insect Farm Facebook Page: http://on.fb.me/1ETp4No

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15 insects you can eat

15 insects you can eat | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
From beetles and butterflies to dragonflies and lice, bugs from the following orders are all good enough to eat.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Given the food crunch the globe is in, all I can say is this: Bring on the cricket skewers and roasted water bugs, the smoked tarantulas and candied ants. If you’re an eater of creatures already, get on this!" Melissa Breyer.

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▶ Pot Luck Night Insect Delights - YouTube

https://youtu.be/5jSBgoItmRg
Ana C. Day's insight:

Published on May 8, 2015

An insect cooking video featuring a few recipes which are great for pot lucks or other events. This was done with the learning centre at UBC in Vancouver, BC. Website coming soon.

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Un lobby presiona para que los insectos entren en la dieta de los europeos - La Celosía

Un lobby presiona para que los insectos entren en la dieta de los europeos - La Celosía | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Productores de insectos de Países Bajos, Francia, Alemania y Sudáfrica unen fuerzas en el lobby, IPIFF, para que se les incluya en la dieta de los europeos
Ana C. Day's insight:

"En la Unión Europea las empresas de insectos producen principalmente alimento para mascotas. El potencial para la harina de insecto es enorme, especialmente para el sector de la alimentación de la acuicultura. IPIFF solicita la revisión de la legislación sobre piensos de la UE con el fin de permitir que los productos de insectos criados en sustratos 100% vegetales puedan ser utilizados como fuentes de proteínas para la acuicultura, aves de corral y cerdos. “Los productos derivados de insectos se pueden utilizar en aplicaciones de alimentación nutricionales y funcionales a precios competitivos, cumpliendo con los estándares más altos de la UE en términos de alimentos y piensos de seguridad”, sostiene Tarique Arsiwalla,  vicepresidente de este lobby."

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Cricket: It's What's For Dinner - Modern Farmer

Cricket: It's What's For Dinner - Modern Farmer | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Cricket-based treats may be coming to California sooner than expected.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"It’s been a refrain for years now: Cows, the most popular livestock in the U.S., need far too many natural resources (water, food, land) to produce each pound of edible protein. Bugs, and crickets in particular, have been suggested as a possible supplement (or, in the particularly Mad Max-ian stories, replacement) for beef: They require little water, little space, and can even be farmed at home with incredibly low-tech, inexpensive equipment. (Basically, all they need is a box.) The latest development is a huge farm in southern California, focused raising the little guys."

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Hair, aphids and bugs: the horrifying stuff we unwittingly eat

Hair, aphids and bugs: the horrifying stuff we unwittingly eat | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Think you know what you're eating? Think again. Read on if you've got a strong stomach
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In Search of the Blue Agave: Tequila Myths - Tequila Myth #1: the worm

In Search of the Blue Agave: Tequila Myths - Tequila Myth #1: the worm | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The worm in mezcal isn't even a traditional element in mezcal production. According to Del Maguey Mezcal, it's a recent development, a marketing ploy that appeared only in the 1940s to try and get more attention on a particular brand of mezcal - and they should know. It's worth reading their story at: www.mezcal.com/worms.html.
 
There are two types of gusano in mezcal: the red (gusano rojo - considered superior because it lives in the root and heart of the maguey) and the less-prized white or gold (gusano de oro), which lives on the leaves. The red gusano turns pale in the mezcal, the gold turns ashen-grey. Both larvae are commonly eaten as food and are sold in Zapotec markets.
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The 10 tastiest insects and bugs in Mexico - Lonely Planet

The 10 tastiest insects and bugs in Mexico - Lonely Planet | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Read The 10 tastiest insects and bugs in Mexico by Lonely Planet
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Once you get over the ew of eating spicy grasshoppers or a creamy winged-ant salsa, you’ll find some high-protein cuisine that is organic and definitely tasty. Really. For centuries it wasn’t meat that sustained Aztec warriors but protein-rich, fat-free stink bugs, mescal worms and fly eggs"

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Entomophagy in our world | Charles Spence | TEDxCityUniversityLondon - YouTube

Professor Spence pinpoints that with the issue of global obesity crisis only getting worse the unorthodox solution may be moving towards widespread enthomoph...
Ana C. Day's insight:

Published on May 5, 2015

Professor Spence pinpoints that with the issue of global obesity crisis only getting worse the unorthodox solution may be moving towards widespread enthomophagy. Maybe, it works for lowering salt in foods or perhaps using neurograstronomy, focusing on pleasurable aspects. Charles addresses all these questions above in his great interactive speech.

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Bug-eating expert visits Needham library

Bug-eating expert visits Needham library | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Pan-roasted mealworm and house crickets cooked with herbs and served over a bed of freshly warmed brown rice. How does that sound?Kids and a few adults
Ana C. Day's insight:

"David Gracer, an English teacher by trade whose love of eating bugs has earned him an appearance on the Colbert Report and a write-up in The New York Times Magazine, discussed the history and, yes, benefits of bug-eating. The program was part of the library's Nature Talks series."

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California’s first edible cricket farm to open in the San Fernando Valley

California’s first edible cricket farm to open in the San Fernando Valley | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
One day soon, the sound of a cricket’s chirp could make your mouth water.

That’s what entrepreneur Elliot Mermel is hoping will happen. The 25-year-old is jumping into the emerging edible insect industry by opening what he calls California’s first urban cricket farm for human consumption in Van Nuys.

“I asked the question everybody else asks at first,” Mermel said Friday. “Who the hell is going to eat a cricket?”
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OPPORTUNITIES AND CONSTRAINTS FOR INCLUSION OF INSECTS in the FOOD CHAIN

OPPORTUNITIES AND CONSTRAINTS FOR INCLUSION OF INSECTS in the FOOD CHAIN | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Publication » OPPORTUNITIES AND CONSTRAINTS FOR INCLUSION OF INSECTS in the FOOD CHAIN.
Ana C. Day's insight:

overview

  1. Context and Drivers in our Food and Feed supply:

    The (animal!) Protein crunch

  2. Why Insects ?

    Most suitable alternative, globally

  3. FAO’s role ?

    Awareness and info sharing

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