Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Would you taste this Irish pest controller’s insect treats? (VIDEO)

Would you taste this Irish pest controller’s insect treats? (VIDEO) | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Taste-testing silkworms, scorpions, beetles and more: an interesting way to attract a crowd.
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
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Popular Swiss insect burgers fly off the shelves |

Popular Swiss insect burgers fly off the shelves | | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Geneva — A Swiss supermarket chain has started selling burgers and balls made from insects, a move being billed as a legal first in Europe.

Seven of Coop's nearly 2 500 stores in Switzerland are serving up the critter concoctions from Zurich-based food startup Essento. A broader launch is planned by year's end.

The bug burgers are made of rice, chopped vegetables, spices and mealworm larvae.
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Charity Looks to Larva as Food For African Orphans

Charity Looks to Larva as Food For African Orphans | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
INDIANAPOLIS -
The Indianapolis-based Global Orphan Foundation has a bold mission -- to care for the world's most vulnerable children -- and is turning to a protein source unusual to the western world. The organization is on the ground in the Democratic Republic of the Congo to implement an easy-to-use system of raising vitamin, protein and micronutrient-packed palm weevil larvae to feed the orphans. Executive Director Nicole Brandt tells Barbara Lewis in The Business of Health the insect is typically a delicacy in central Africa and "no one has really farmed it before." The farming cycle, for which the organization has created a process and training program, yields a new crop of edible insects in about a month and uses plastic storage bins and split sugar cane.
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Experts Warn About Allergies to Edible Insects

Experts Warn About Allergies to Edible Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
CHUNCHEON, Dec. 8 (Korea Bizwire) — A series of reports of allergic reactions following the consumption of edible insects have raised concern over a food source that is expected to be of significant importance in the future.

According to a survey conducted by the Korea Consumer Agency with a sample of 500 respondents, 46 people have experienced allergy symptoms after eating insects for food, accounting for 9.2 percent of the total.

Among those who experienced allergies to edible insects, approximately 1 in 4 suffered from skin rashes and breathing problems.

The 12 people who experienced skin conditions were found to have eaten more traditional choices like silkworm pupas and grasshoppers, as well as other edible insects such as two-spotted crickets.

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The future of protein really bugs us ('cause it's crickets)

The future of protein really bugs us ('cause it's crickets) | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Your protein shakes could soon be loaded with insects - seriously. Eating bugs could be the newest trend to hit the wellness world in 2018, and it's already generating a lot of buzz.

The key is cricket flour - it's eaten similarly to protein powder and is rich with nutrients. A single serving of cricket flour has triple the protein of a serving of steak and twice that of chicken.

Of course, cricket protein is definitely not vegan. But it does offer an alternative to more typical animal proteins (such as meat or whey) that harm the environment when produced on a mass scale.
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It's Not Just A Bug, It's A Fine-Dining Feature At This Thailand Restaurant

It's Not Just A Bug, It's A Fine-Dining Feature At This Thailand Restaurant | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In his tiny kitchen, chef Thitiwat Tantragarn throws a handful of raw bamboo caterpillars into a hot skillet and sautés them with olive oil, paprika, cumin, salt and pepper. Seconds later, the cream-colored larvae are crispy on the outside and soft on the inside. Tantragarn adds white wine, then spoons the bugs, brown beady eyes and all, over grilled scallops and Jerusalem artichokes before sending the plate out to the dining room.

This is Insects in the Backyard, a restaurant in Bangkok that is turning bugs into haute cuisine. It opened in the city's trendy Chang Chui market in July.
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Grub’s up!

Grub’s up! | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
After watching locals in Malawi snacking on flying termites, British charity worker Shami Radia opened a pop-up restaurant in London with a seven-course menu dedicated to insects.

With 400 satisfied customers in five days, Radia and his friend Neil Whippey took the plunge in 2014 and set up Eat Grub, a business selling insect-based foods to major online retailers and supermarkets, including Ocado, Amazon and Planet Organic.

“We are trying to make people think about what they are doing,” 35-year-old Whippey, a former television sound mixer, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.
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Livsmedelsverket: Sweden won't allow edible insects as food 2018 - Bug Burger - äta insekter!

Livsmedelsverket: Sweden won't allow edible insects as food 2018 - Bug Burger - äta insekter! | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Today, the same day as the state of Finland celebrated its 100 year birthday, Swedens National Food Agency Livsmedelsverket declared that they won’t follow Finland’s and Denmark’s example, and set up its own rules on how to handle edible insects.

According to the statement, Livsmedelsverket holds on to its old interpretation of the Novel Food Act, and claim that they do it to protect consumers:

-Livsmedelsverket’s mission is to ensure that no one gets sick from food, while we want to help companies to do the right thing. Since the intention of the EU legislation is clear, we have chosen not to open up any alternative interpretations – the health and safety of consumers comes first, says Annica Sohlström, Director General at Livsmedelsverket, according to todays press release.
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Effects of formulation and process conditions on microstructure, texture and digestibility of extruded insect-riched snacks

Highlights

Extrusion-cooking was used to produce wheat snacks enriched with edible insects.

Insects fat was the main determinant for changes in snack microstructure.

Snacks at 10% insects substitution maintained acceptable textural qualities.

Microstructure of snacks was the main determinant of digestibility.
Abstract
Extruded cereals made of wheat flour and grinded Yellow mealworm larvae (Tenebrio molitor) were produced to investigate the effect of insect inclusion (0%, 10%, 20%) and processing conditions (barrel temperature and screw speed) on their nutritional content, microstructure, texture and digestibility. Snacks enriched with 10% mealworm powder shifted their macronutrient composition towards a protein content high enough to claim the food as “source of protein” according to European food regulation. At 10% of enrichment, the adoption of high barrel temperature and screw speed significantly improved the microstructure, in terms of expansion and pore structure, delivering acceptable textural qualities. At 20% substitution, snacks showed poor expansion properties, mainly due to the presence of fat in the larvae. Starch and protein digestibility of were correlated with microstructure properties as a function of porosity, pore size and wall thickness. Interestingly, mechanical forces generated in extrusion likely improved the digestibility of T. molitor proteins which are tightly bound and sclerotized to the exoskeleton.
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The Food Guy: From crickets to cannabis, a look at 2018 food trends

The Food Guy: From crickets to cannabis, a look at 2018 food trends | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
What else do these culinary prognosticators foresee in 2018?

More cricket flour and other nongrain sustainable proteins, the rise of fermented foods, handmade cocktail mixers and bitters created for home use, savory flavors where you’d traditionally expect sweet, and collagen-infused foods that give you the opportunity to “eat for beauty.”

You heard it here first, folks, but you might want to take these predictions with a grain of salt.

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Feed DR Congo's Orphans through Insect Farming

Feed DR Congo's Orphans through Insect Farming | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Summary

The DR Congo (DRC) is one of the poorest and most food insecure countries of the world, and the country's 5 million orphaned children face particularly grave hunger and malnutrition. To address the challenge of under-nutrition in orphanages, Farms for Orphans launched an insect farming program. Insects are a nutritious and popular food in DRC but are typically wild-harvested. By farming insects, orphanages can grow their own protein source and generate income through the sale of surplus yields.

$10,000
total goal
$3,656
remaining
79
donors
2
monthly donors
6
months
Challenge

One child under the age of 5 dies of starvation every 3.6 seconds. For millions of kids, chronic malnutrition will result in stunting - a condition that stunts a child's physical and cognitive growth. Good nutrition is the foundation of child survival, health and development. Farms for Orphans is working to alleviate hunger and malnutrition in one of the world's lowest socioeconomic sectors- orphaned children- through the introduction of small scale edible insect farming, starting in the DRC.
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London Chef Cooks Up Bug-Based Meal For Children’s Entomophagy Education | Skyline Newspaper

London Chef Cooks Up Bug-Based Meal For Children’s Entomophagy Education | Skyline Newspaper | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
If you’re like most people, you probably don’t particularly like bugs. But according to IB Times, the students at Clapton Girls’ Academy in Hackney, London came face-to-face with all sorts of insects during their entomophagy education, which is intended to prepare them for a new GCSE (General Certificate of Secondary Education).

Not just that, but the insects had been turned into items resembling normal foods!

Andy Holcroft, head chef at Grub Kitchen, was in charge of creating the unique recipes and putting them to the test. He cooked for an establishment known as Rentokil’s Pestaurant Lunch Club, which specializes in entomophagy — the consumption of insects.
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Opportunities and hurdles of edible insects for food and feed

Opportunities and hurdles of edible insects for food and feed | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Abstract

Entomophagy, the consumption of insects, is promoted as an alternative sustainable source of protein for humans and animals. Seminal literature highlights predominantly the benefits, but with limited empirical support and evaluation. We highlight the historical significance of entomophagy by humans and key opportunities and hurdles identified by research to date, paying particular attention to research gaps. It is known that insects present a nutritional opportunity, being generally high in protein and key micronutrients, but it is unclear how their nutritional quality is influenced by what they are fed. Research indicates that, in ideal conditions, insects have a smaller environmental impact than more traditional Western forms of animal protein; less known is how to scale up insect production while maintaining these environmental benefits. Studies overall show that insects could make valuable economic and nutritional contributions to the food or feed systems, but there are no clear regulations in place to bring insects into such supply systems.
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Bugs: the food of the future?

Bugs: the food of the future? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The Nutrient Value Score (NVS) is a tool used to evaluate the nutritional content of food based on energy, protein, fat, and eight micronutrients. A 2016 study used NVS and found that palm weevil larvae and mealworms were significantly healthier than both beef and chicken. The study also revealed that the median iron content of crickets and honeybees were 180 and 850 per cent greater than beef, respectively.
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Rising demand for protein rich food is anticipated to bolster the growth of edible insect food market in near future detailed in new research report

Rising demand for protein rich food is anticipated to bolster the growth of edible insect food market in near future detailed in new research report | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
“Edible Insect Food Market: Global Demand Analysis & Opportunity Outlook 2021” The global edible insect food market is segmented into type such as mealworm, locusts, grasshoppers, caterpillar, beetles, termites and others. Among these segments, beetles segment is envisioned to grasp a remarkable CAGR by the end of 2023. Likely, growing popularity of edible insect food in developing and developed nations on the back of high protein content is envisioned to flourish the growth of global edible insect food market.
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Campbell's: The top 6 food trends for 2018

Campbell's: The top 6 food trends for 2018 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Stage 4, Mainstream: Alternatives Rule

Whether it's cricket flour, ancient grains or burgers made in a lab, CCBI expects consumers to continue to search out alternatives to traditional staples. CCBI expects this to be a major trend not only next year, but for the foreseeable future.
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Advisory: Beware of Allergies to Edible Insects

Advisory: Beware of Allergies to Edible Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Following reports of allergic reactions suffered after the consumption of edible insects, the Korea Consumer Agency conducted a survey sampling 500 respondents. Of those, 46 people (9.2%) had experienced allergic reactions.

The 12 people who experienced skin reactions had eaten more traditional choices such as silkworm pupas and grasshoppers, as well as other edible insects such as two-spotted crickets.

The agency also disclosed that between the years of 2013 and 2016, 156 cases of allergic reactions were reported related to the consumption of silkworm pupa, widely known as bundaegi. Of those, 76.9% experienced rashes and other skin-related conditions, while 9% suffered from stomach pain and other digestive conditions.
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What will 2018 bring for pub food?

What will 2018 bring for pub food? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Exciting new eating trends, from Hawaiian bowl food to insect protein, could be coming to the fore in 2018.
This was the year of the avocado boom and ‘fake news’ was added to the dictionary. But that was 2017 and next year looks set to be full of exciting new trends, with some familiar themes thrown into the mix too.

Food trends set to rock the culinary world over the next 12 months, according to research carried out by Waitrose’s Food and Drink Report 2017-18​, include Indian street food, but not the traditional takeaway style. No heavy sauces or chicken korma, it is all about smoked, grilled or seared dishes, such as scallops with pickled ginger.
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Grub’s up! Climate-conscious foodies swap cows for crickets

Grub’s up! Climate-conscious foodies swap cows for crickets | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The edible bug business is booming, with a global market of US$33 million (RM134 million) in 2015, according to the research firm Global Market Insights, which expects it to grow 40 per cent by 2023.

“There’s a certain age group now that really consider sustainability as a factor in their choices,” Whippey said.

“There are many people who keep fit and are concerned about looking after the planet.”

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Great deals on edible scorpions and more at Village Vanguard

Great deals on edible scorpions and more at Village Vanguard | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
TOKYO
Every New Year’s season, most shops around Japan offer lucky bags (fukubukuro) which are large packs of various items usually sold at a nice discount. They tend to go on sale early January, but national novelty store chain Village Vanguard has got one so hot that they are accepting pre-orders from now until Dec 15.

It’s called the Takeo Insect Food Lucky Bag, and as its no-frills name suggests, it is an assortment of foods made from insects – the term “made from” is used loosely here as for the most part these are just whole insects.

The first item in the Takeo Insect Food Lucky Bag is one 15-gram pack of Mixed Pupae. This hearty snack food is comprised of mealworms, superworms, silkworms, and sago palm weevil larva. While these are technically larvae rather than pupae, they certainly are mixed, and they also come lightly salted for your snacking pleasure.
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The F&A-Tech Blog - Alternative protein for human consumption

The F&A-Tech Blog - Alternative protein for human consumption | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The disruption potential of alternative proteins for human consumption

As we thoroughly discussed in our most recent newsletter, a separation between the demand and available supply of animal protein is expected to occur over the coming decades.  

In fact, that separation proves so glaring that it is currently the driving force of the unprecedented innovation in the alternative protein space.  Entrepreneurs of all backgrounds, whether they be economists or engineers, have jumped at the opportunity to tap into the multibillion dollar animal protein industry.  We focused primarily on animal feed in our last newsletter, so it is important to reiterate why dozens of startups and millions of dollars are being invested into companies focused on providing an alternative protein source for human consumption
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Cricket-Infused Dinner a Club Ento Success

Cricket-Infused Dinner a Club Ento Success | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Club Ento hosted a dinner at Azel Backus House on Saturday, Dec. 2, that enabled guests, some formally attired, to experience a meal enriched with protein sourced from crickets. Beginning with goat cheese and cricket appetizers and concluding with cricket-infused brownies, the evening was deemed a success by attendees. Organizers included Club Ento President Spencer Woolfson '20 and Vice President Lila Reid '20.

Club Ento promotes entomophagy, the human consumption of insects and arachnids as food, and other sustainable food - from cricket flour cookies to chocolate covered silkworms. 
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Grub's up! Climate-conscious foodies swap cows for crickets

Grub's up! Climate-conscious foodies swap cows for crickets | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
With 400 satisfied customers in five days, Radia and his friend Neil Whippey took the plunge in 2014 and set up Eat Grub, a business selling insect-based foods to major online retailers and supermarkets, including Ocado, Amazon and Planet Organic.

“We are trying to make people think about what they are doing,” 35-year-old Whippey, a former television sound mixer, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

“If a family of four were to eat one meal with insects per week for a year, it would save 500,000 litres of water,” he said, referring to the vast amounts of water needed to produce beef in an increasingly water-stressed world.

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Creepy crawlies - this newest future food has hit the ground hopping | The Memo

Creepy crawlies - this newest future food has hit the ground hopping | The Memo | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
SUMMARY
The ultra-sustainable food movement of the future

On the tail end of The Memo’s Future Food month, we’ve taken a look at one more trend that experts say is the sustainable food source of the future.

Though you might squirm at the thought now, we’ll all be eating bugs soon enough. They require much less water than cows or pigs to produce, but pack an impressive protein punch.

From protein powder to cocktail bitters, The Memo spoke to five companies with creepy crawly products already on the market.
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Global Edible Insects Market 2017 Research Report By Industry Trends – Positive Newspaper

Global Edible Insects Market 2017 Research Report By Industry Trends – Positive Newspaper | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Intense Research published today its Edible Insects Market Report, providing a comprehensive analysis of consumer behavior, demographics, and preferences, as well as a complete account of industry trends in the worldwide Edible Insects market in 2017. This latest edition of the industry-leading report presents several new datasets and analyses including an expanded list of new states. The report captures key observations of local, regional and national Edible Insects in both residential and commercial markets.

Edible Insects Market and its full set of analysis are now available through Intense Research, including comprehensive Edible Insects data on pricing and savings. Client gets 100% satisfaction about product and their current market trends & opportunities.
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Op-Ed: The Triangle should give crickets a chance

Op-Ed: The Triangle should give crickets a chance | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The Triangle is known as a food destination. Durham even boasts the title of "The South’s Tastiest Town” according to Southern Magazine. Amid all the buzz over food, North Carolinians are also becoming more conscious of what’s served on their plate, and the popularity of local and responsibly produced food reflects that.

Not all food is produced responsibly, though, and there are many issues associated with industrial farming that are hard to ignore. In North Carolina alone, the hog industry raises about nine million pigs that create 15.5 metric tons of feces annually. Living near these hog operations is not only crappy, but also harms health.
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Why do we still avoid eating insects? | The Medium

Sometimes, when my dad is craving something salty to accompany his meal, he will grab a can of beondegi from the pantry. The small brown silkworm pupae appear like small oval pennies. My dad eats the canned insects with relish, but to me, the thought of putting one into my mouth is enough to kill my appetite. So why is it that the idea of eating insects is so unappealing?

One-hundred-and-thirty of 195 countries around the globe, primarily in Africa, Asia, and South America, eat insects as part of their traditional diet. Yet here in North America, insects are rare or even absent from traditional cuisine. Instead, we rely on conventional sources of protein, such as chicken, pork, beef, or even tofu to get our daily protein.

Insects also have a smaller carbon footprint than most sources of protein. Food-conversion-ratio refers to how many kilograms of feed for the livestock is necessary for one kilogram of edible weight. Pork has a food-conversation-ratio of four kilograms to produce one kilogram of pork, and beef requires 8.8 kilograms of feed to produce a single kilogram of beef. In comparison, crickets have a feed-conversion-ratio of 2.3. But if insects are nutritious and so environmentally-friendly, why haven’t we adopted insects into our diet?
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