Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Popular Swiss insect burgers fly off the shelves |

Popular Swiss insect burgers fly off the shelves | | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Geneva — A Swiss supermarket chain has started selling burgers and balls made from insects, a move being billed as a legal first in Europe.

Seven of Coop's nearly 2 500 stores in Switzerland are serving up the critter concoctions from Zurich-based food startup Essento. A broader launch is planned by year's end.

The bug burgers are made of rice, chopped vegetables, spices and mealworm larvae.
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What to do in Bangkok this weekend, Nov. 17-18, plus one cheeky art opening tonight | Coconuts Bangkok

What to do in Bangkok this weekend, Nov. 17-18, plus one cheeky art opening tonight | Coconuts Bangkok | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Though there are always endless options for things to do in Bangkok, here are our top picks for this weekend.
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Expanding Your Horizons | 4ento

Expanding Your Horizons | 4ento | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

But how to make a good impression with something so misinterpreted, so unsexy and rejected like INSECTS? It is to hard to sell , when insects are something that most people fail to show any affection or concern?

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Cooking with Bugs: Mealworm Grilled Cheese!

Cooking with Bugs: Mealworm Grilled Cheese! | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
You are probably wondering if you read that headline correctly. We are here to tell you that bugs can not only be delicious when prepared the right way, they are also the food group of the future!  

Eating insects is the future of food because they: 

1.  are a sustainable food source.

2.  are a good source of protein. 

3.  have been used for food in cultures around the world for thousands of years. 

4.  are in many of the packaged food you consume already! Read more here.

Just to show you how easy it is to incorporate bugs into the dishes you love, check out our new series of cooking videos featuring Chef Joseph Yoon. 
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Exo and Tiny Farms—hope to leverage the humble cricket and make it the next great protein #MAEKAN

Exo and Tiny Farms—hope to leverage the humble cricket and make it the next great protein #MAEKAN | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

From stadium concession stands to DIY mealworm farms, edible insects have been making headlines in the last couple of years. But bugs are not just another viral food trend—they could potentially be the answer to the world’s growing food security problems. Edible insects are, after all, a sustainable food source that is both as good for us as it is for the planet.
Two companies—Exo and Tiny Farms—hope to leverage the humble cricket and make it the next great protein. But while many cultures around the world eat insects, Western countries are finding the concept a little harder to swallow. Could companies like cricket protein bar producer Exo and cricket flour supplier Tiny Farms be the next step towards bugs in our diet?

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Bees, edible insects and vegetarians - Dani Jump - legendary tour guide in Siem Reap, Cambodia - YouTube

Cambodia is a hotspot of entomophagy in the world. Psa Leu is the market in Siem Reap where you can see everything available to human consumption. And Dani Jump, the legendary tour guide can explain everything to you. Some impressions and a talk.
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NPD Tracker - Hain adds to UK soup range; Oppo healthy ice cream; Essento Insect Bar; Orkla reduced-sugar Risifrutti

NPD Tracker - Hain adds to UK soup range; Oppo healthy ice cream; Essento Insect Bar; Orkla reduced-sugar Risifrutti | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Swiss retailer Coop adds third Essento edible insect variety

Coop, the Swiss retailer, has added to the range of edible insect products it is selling.

The products, created by Zurich-based start-up firm Essento, are now available in 12 of Coop's stores.

Since last August, Coop has been selling Essento flour worm burgers and meatballs.

The Insect Bar is made from natural ingredients - crickets, dates, apples, sultanas and cranberries - and sells for CHF3.60 (US$3.60).

Silvio Baselgia, responsible for fresh produce at Coop, said: "The trend is for healthy snacks, which allow you to quickly fill up energy bars. The energy bars respond perfectly to this demand and insects, by their pleasant taste and their high nutritional values, integrate perfectly with their composition. "

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Plongez dans un nouveau monde de saveurs

Plongez dans un nouveau monde de saveurs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Appétit éveillé? Vous trouverez les produits d’Essento dans les magasins suivants:
Coop Sihlcity (Zurich) 
Coop Südpark (Bâle)
Coop Wankdorf (Berne)
Coop Stadttor (Winterthour)
Coop Canobbio Resega (Lugano)
Coop Grancy (Lausanne)
Coop Eaux-Vives (Genève)
et sur coop@home

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Coop Switzerland Launches Energy Bars Made From Insects | ESM Magazine

Coop Switzerland Launches Energy Bars Made From Insects | ESM Magazine | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Coop Switzerland has followed up the launch of burgers and meatballs developed from insects last August with ‘Insect Bars’, a range of energy bars made from dried crickets, along with dates, apples, sultanas and cranberries.

The bars have been developed by Essento, the same Swiss startup that developed the burgers and meatballs, which were developed from mealworms.

"The trend is for healthy snacks, which allow you to quickly fill up, said Silvio Baselgia, fresh produce manager at Coop. “These energy bars respond perfectly to this demand and insects, via their pleasant taste and their high nutritional values, integrate perfectly with this composition.”

Expanded Offer

Since the launch of the Essento range in the summer, just seven outlets have been selling the burgers and meatballs, due to the low availability of edible insects, however following this launch, this has now been extended to twelve, including stores in Zurich, Lusanne, Geneva, Neuchatel, Basel, Bern and other locations.
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A Fine Dining Experience...with Insects - Made in Shoreditch Magazine

A Fine Dining Experience...with Insects - Made in Shoreditch Magazine | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Crické Executive Chef and Culinary Lab Head Marco Parrinello is the mind behind this Mediterranean-inspired six-courses menu, in which crickets, black ants, and bamboo worms are the special secret ingredients.

Expect burrata with black-ant caviar, pasta made with cricket flour, cricket falafels and a mealworm dessert. The menu is paired with a special Tuscany wine selection singled out by Enoteca Pomaio’s sommeliers.

Have a look at the entire food menu and book your place via this link: http://www.crickefood.com/events/cricke-fine-insect-dinner/
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Edible insects: sustainable food of the future?

Since even the sight or sound of an insect can make some people’s skin crawl, the idea of eating them as part of our daily diet is not particularly appealing. While some Asian countries already use insects for both food and feed, they are a far cry from traditional Western food choices.

However, a review paper published in Nutrition Bulletin suggested their nutritional and sustainable qualities warrant us to disregard these squeamish thoughts, and start considering them as sustainable sources of food and feed for our continuously growing population.

Insects contain key micronutrients and high levels of protein that humans usually get from traditional protein sources such as cattle, chicken and pigs. In the review, it states that over 2000 edible species of insects have been a source of food for hundreds of years in more than 100 countries. For example, in central Africa up to 50% of dietary protein has come from insects, with their market value higher than many alternative sources of animal protein.
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These Insects May Soon Become Dinnertime Staples

These Insects May Soon Become Dinnertime Staples | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insect eating or “entomophagy” is common to 80% of the world’s countries. It’s estimated that two billion people partake in it around the globe. Environmental companies and economic forces alike are recruiting entrepreneurs to indulge in insect-driven dishes.

While some of these meals might entice you (who doesn’t like a good taco?), they’ll all definitely surprise you. Insect entrees may be all the buzz among start-ups, but would you eat these six-legged dishes?
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Bugs can heal the world, Bengalureans show how - Bangalore Mirror -

Bugs can heal the world, Bengalureans show how - Bangalore Mirror - | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Forget high-tech solutions to fight environmental woes, this growing tribe sees hope in microbes, insects and seeds

You are watching National Geographic,” Richard Gomes declares teasingly as he lifts the lid off a wooden crate. Inside, darkling beetles are wriggling their way through maize bran, and two blocks of thermocol. “The Swiss cheese-like holes that you see on thermocol is their hardwork. They have been munching on the thermocol for two weeks, and have reduced them from 50gm to 25gm. I am waiting for them to start mating and producing larvae (called mealworms), because it’s the hungry larvae that eat more, and faster,” he explains.

Thermocol-eating mealworms are as healthy as those feeding on a normal diet of bran, the Stanford University established in 2015. Plus, the worm waste is safe to use in soil for plants and crops. While the 100 mealworms under study could only consume Styrofoam, of the weight of a pill every day, all thanks to the bacteria in their guts, scientists see these insects as potential fighters of plastic pollution. The quest for their marine equivalent is on too.
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Portland brownies with a secret ingredient: Crickets

Portland brownies with a secret ingredient: Crickets | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Charles Wilson has created what may be the holy grail for chocoholics – a yummy, moist, low-sugar, gluten-free brownie with a concept that's just off-putting enough to make it un-bingeable.

The not-so-secret ingredient in his Cricket Flours brand brownie mix is crickets — yes, actual crickets – milled into a fine powder. Each brownie contains the equivalent of about 12 crickets and double the protein of a standard serving.

A 2013 report by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization estimated that some 2 billion people incorporate insects into their diets, and expansion of the practice would have health, environmental and economic benefits worldwide.
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BUG GRUB: Join the I'm A Celeb stars with your very own home bushtrucker trial

BUG GRUB: Join the I'm A Celeb stars with your very own home bushtrucker trial | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
And my idea of an exotic meal is deciding whether to order a chicken jalfrezi or vindaloo down at my local curry house.

So the thought of chomping down on crazy critters from the Outback like the stars from ITV’s I’m A Celebrity leaves me in a cold sweat.

I’m not alone – this year’s contestants are already living in fear of the mad morsels they may be forced to eat as part of the challenges in the Jungle.

Football hardman Dennis Wise and Hollyoaks’ Jamie Lomas both admit that their worst nightmare would be tucking into an animal’s penis.
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London chef serves schoolgirls cricket crepes and bug burgers

London chef serves schoolgirls cricket crepes and bug burgers | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The menu includes curried cauliflower and cricket pakoras and black ant and chilli cheese paté for starters.

For mains there was a high protein bug burger made with mealworms, crickets, and grasshoppers. And for dessert, the chef prepared cricket crepes with chocolate sauce, vanilla ice cream, and bug praline. Tasty!

"It's not difficult to make a tasty meal using edible insects," Holcroft said. "You can be really creative with the way insects are incorporated within a meal." For instance, they can be used as decoration, or even as flour.
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ENTOMO FARMS - The Cube In Focus - YouTube

Introducing Darren Goldin, the co-founder of Entomo Farms - An alternative protein company that raises and processes insects into a form of protein powder!
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Food Wars: A New Hop

Food Wars: A New Hop | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Obtaining and Sustaining Protein Alternatives

The demand for high-quality, sustainable protein alternatives is predicted to skyrocket over the coming years. Yes, there are known substitute protein sources, such as algae proteins or cultured meat, but they have limitations of their own. Algae protein is infamous for its heavily distinctive taste, and cultured meat is at least a decade (if not more) away from becoming commercially viable. These are not the only recognized sources of alternative protein. Insect protein is drawing a great deal of attention – crickets in particular – although these are also accompanied by their own set of problems. Crickets possess a very distinct smell and flavor which is hard to mask, making them a complicated ingredient with which to work.
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Ten course edible insect dinner in Brooklyn

Ten course edible insect dinner in Brooklyn | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Ten course edible insect dinner in Brooklyn
Description
epa06329001 Gusano worms on top of fluke crudo with gusano salt are served during a ten course dinner of dishes featuring edible insects created by chef Joseph Yoon, of the company Diner Echo and the group Brooklyn Bugs, at the Brooklyn Kitchen, in Brooklyn, New York, USA, 13 November 2017 (issued 14 November). Yoon, who runs a high end catering and private chef business, became interested in edible insects earlier this year, both as a creative endeavor as a chef and because of the potential long term positive ecological impact of promoting insects as food. He works to make appetizing and visually appealing dishes with various insects including scorpions, hornets, mealworms, crickets, and grasshoppers. The dinner was co-organized and hosted by the adventurous eating club, 'Gastronauts'. EPA-EFE/JUSTIN LANE ATTENTION: This Image is part of a PHOTO SET
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Paleodiet and edible insects

Paleodiet and edible insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Being insects an excellent and indisputable protein source (among other things, destined to be increasingly “in vogue” with the passing of time), we may reflect that their use as food could belong to an even older tradition respect what we already imagine.

The Paleodiet for example, the typical Paleolithic diet, has its foundations in that period before the discovery of agriculture and stockbreeding: this diet goes back more than 10,000 years ago, and according to experts, the foods consumed at that time would be only those that could be collected or hunted (so insects as well!).

Authors like Voegtlin, Eaton or Cordain argue that the diet would evolve in too narrow times to allow our organism to adapt genetically to “new” foods such as legumes, cereals, dairy products and refined sugars, blaming them even to be the cause of all the illnesses of our millennium: in their view, a return to more ancestral food can only benefit our body. The foods “admitted” in line with this theory would be: fruit, vegetables, meat, fish, eggs, seeds, nuts, roots, tubers (topinambur, daikon, dandelion, parnsip or sweet potatoes), herbs, fungi and algae.
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NPD Tracker - Oppo healthy ice cream; Essento Insect Bar; Orkla reduced-sugar Risifrutti

NPD Tracker - Oppo healthy ice cream; Essento Insect Bar; Orkla reduced-sugar Risifrutti | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Swiss retailer Coop adds third Essento edible insect variety

Coop, the Swiss retailer, has added to the range of edible insect products it is selling.

The products, created by Zurich-based start-up firm Essento, are now available in 12 of Coop's stores.

Since last August, Coop has been selling Essento flour worm burgers and meatballs.

The Insect Bar is made from natural ingredients - crickets, dates, apples, sultanas and cranberries - and sells for CHF3.60 (US$3.60).

Silvio Baselgia, responsible for fresh produce at Coop, said: "The trend is for healthy snacks, which allow you to quickly fill up energy bars. The energy bars respond perfectly to this demand and insects, by their pleasant taste and their high nutritional values, integrate perfectly with their composition. "
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Why killing crickets is morally ok | SENS Cricket Flour Bars

Why killing crickets is morally ok |  SENS Cricket Flour Bars | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
I think most people would agree that harming anything that can suffer or feel pain is a negative thing. Unfortunately, our current food and agricultural industries contributes to this bad practice regularly. So what can a person do if she wants to reduce the inhumane treatment of animals while getting all the nutritional benefits that animal foods provide? The answer lies in the insect kingdom.
Are they sentient creatures? Do they feel pain?
Whether an organism is sentient or not has a big impact on how humans think about it and how they treat it. That’s why, at least for vegans, plants are ok to eat, but animals are not. Insects are sort of a special case in this sense, because while they belong to the animal category, their sentience is still up for debate.
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Essento Insect Bar - Essento - Essbare Insekten auf den Tisch

Essento Insect Bar - Essento - Essbare Insekten auf den Tisch | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The Essento product family is richer by a member!
Essento continues to pioneer in the field of Food Revolution around edible insects and brings you the Essento Insect bar.  The little sisters of Essento Insect burgers and Essento Insect Balls is sweet and energetic. Yet but the bar from Grill flour, dates, apples, raisins, figs and cranberries based still on the family traditions. Like its siblings the bolt of pure natural ingredients is composed and designed with attention to taste.

The energy bar is suitable as a snack between meals as well as for the health conscious and gourmet. In athletes the product with barbecue meal fits perfectly into the diet and provides the necessary energy boost at the right time. Crickets have only a high protein content of important vitamins and minerals and can satisfy such important needs of the body.
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It’s crunch time for crickets: Is there a sea change for insects?

It’s crunch time for crickets: Is there a sea change for insects? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
13 Nov 2017 --- As the world’s population continues to bulge, the issue of food security is a hot topic in the food industry, particularly how best to meet the challenges of providing protein – that’s where insects come in. Eating them is nothing new for the East, but in Western cultures, tucking into creepy crawlies is riddled with challenges, despite their indisputable protein and nutritional credentials, and there are many questions when it comes to industry turning to insects to address the protein shortfall.

Despite the fact that feelings often run high where insects are concerned – many people are even squeamish to look at them, let alone touch or swallow them. And yet they present a huge nutritional opportunity as an increasing global population seeks sustainable sources of food and feed.

Insects have generally high levels of animal protein and key micronutrients with lower environmental footprints than traditional alternatives, and they can be raised on leftovers. But cultural, social and economic hurdles remain, reports a review paper that has just been published in Nutrition Bulletin.
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Berlin Street Taste: INSECTS

Berlin Street Taste: INSECTS | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Microcosm is the ambitious food project of the actress and restaurateur Nicole Sartirani. At the same time will take the disgust and the fear of insects them yourself referred microcosm as a "Growtainer" of ideas and actions of the people of Europe for the diet with insects and awareness. What sounds pretty crazy at first glance, is actually a rather innovative food movement, which is growing currently in in Europe. According to a report by the UN itself about two billion people to feed in countless countries around the world every day from insects. Especially in Asian cuisine and also in some African and South American countries, the preparation of insects is not exotic, but normal.
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Taste Education helps Edible Insects Attract Consumers – Food Tank

Taste Education helps Edible Insects Attract Consumers – Food Tank | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Second, taste education can help one reach beyond their “culinary comfort zones” and value the unknown. Consumer preference is incredibly important when determining whether or not insects will be accepted as a food choice in the West. With gastronomy being dynamic and based on culinary norms in a particular society, taste education is a chance to help challenge set tastes and values towards entomophagy and slowly transform the initial “ick factor” into intrigue.

This is particularly important among children and adolescents, a demographic that have not developed such strong habits and emotions towards specific food groups. For example, at Tandem Festival in Oxford, U.K. around a third of the group was aged between 5–10 years old; the perfect participants for creating a nutritious “bug banquet.” Picnic benches offered an array of roasted vegetables, locally baked breads and wraps, cheeses, and edible insects.
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