Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Bugs in your protein bar: are edible insects the next food craze?

Bugs in your protein bar: are edible insects the next food craze? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A wave of startups is pushing chips, bars, flour and more made out of crickets and other critters
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
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Popular Swiss insect burgers fly off the shelves |

Popular Swiss insect burgers fly off the shelves | | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Geneva — A Swiss supermarket chain has started selling burgers and balls made from insects, a move being billed as a legal first in Europe.

Seven of Coop's nearly 2 500 stores in Switzerland are serving up the critter concoctions from Zurich-based food startup Essento. A broader launch is planned by year's end.

The bug burgers are made of rice, chopped vegetables, spices and mealworm larvae.
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Edible Insects Market Worth 1,181.6 Million USD by 2023

Edible Insects Market Worth 1,181.6 Million USD by 2023 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
LONDON, March 21, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- According to this latest publication from Meticulous Research™, the global edible insects market is expected to be valued at USD 1,181.6 million by 2023, growing at a CAGR of 23.8% from 2018, mainly due to “growing population and decreasing food resources, increasing demand for protein rich food, high cost of animal protein, environmental sustainability with production and consumption of edible insects, high nutritional value of insects, and low risk of transmitting zoonotic disease.”

Request Sample Report: https://www.meticulousresearch.com/request-sample-report/?cp_id=3881

The report also notes that, crickets commanded the largest of the global edible insects market in 2017, primarily attributed to “its high nutritional value, easy farming, easy processing and incorporation into various food recipes & products, and increasing demand for cricket-based products, such as protein powder, protein bars, and snacks, among others”.
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Don't Knock this Unexpected Protein Source until you Try It. | elephant journal

Don't Knock this Unexpected Protein Source until you Try It. | elephant journal | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Enter insects into the picture.

Insects like crickets and mealworms are high in B12, protein, iron, calcium, fibre, prebiotic fiber, and all nine essential amino acids, and they boast an impressive ratio of Omega 6 and 3. And, if that’s not enough, their ecological footprint (or “foodprint” if you like) is far smaller than any other protein source on the planet…including soy (a main source of protein for most vegans and vegetarians).

But, bugs? Really?!
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It may not be mainstream yet, but insect protein won’t bug out retailers for long

It may not be mainstream yet, but insect protein won’t bug out retailers for long | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The case for using crickets is actually very compelling: A serving of 2.5 tablespoons contains 90 calories and 13 grams of protein. It also contains enough B12 vitamins to carry you through the day. Per kilogram, crickets contain as much protein as pork. The University of Oxford published a study on the nutritional value of crickets versus meat products. When measuring protein content, vitamins, sugar and fat, crickets ended up ahead in most categories. While some studies may have pointed out some of the limitations around cricket consumption, scientific consensus is building. Not surprising then, that Loblaw has been looking at this for a few years.
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Ikea's New Meatballs Are Not for the Squeamish

Ikea's New Meatballs Are Not for the Squeamish | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Now, they're really getting into the alternative protein game with two new real meatball prototypes. Space10 is calling it the Neatball, and one version is made with mealworms. According to Wikipedia, mealworms are "the larval form of the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, a species of darkling beetle." Meatballs made with mashed bugs, anyone? Space10 says they like to eat them served traditional-style with mashed potatoes, gravy and lingonberry sauce.  
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The bug in our diet: Throw away everything you think about eating insects; it’s the future of protein and the future is now

The bug in our diet: Throw away everything you think about eating insects; it’s the future of protein and the future is now | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In Canada, eating crickets has gone mainstream. Loblaw Companies Ltd. is giving credence to the projection that insect protein could be the future of food by adding Entomo’s cricket powder to its PC Insiders Collection for spring. Now sold at every Loblaw grocery store in the country, the immense availability of cricket powder signals a significant shift in attitudes. The fact that you can pick up a bag at your local supermarket firmly establishes insect protein as a choice for Canadian consumers.
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Raft of changes to the legal status of edible insects around the globe

Raft of changes to the legal status of edible insects around the globe | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
This time last year, Bugsolutely founder Massimo Reverberi provided us with a comprehensive assessment of the legal status of edible insects. Revising the topic 12 months on, he has found some significant changes.
Entomophagy is a new phenomenon in the West, and as a result it is rarely regulated. This leads to public institutions like food agencies, customs and health departments often finding themselves helpless in the face of new product development based on processed insects. 

From a geographical point of view, there are three legal trends. First, there are the “Anglo-Saxon” countries: UK, USA, Canada, New Zealand and Australia, for whom edible insects do not represent a novel food, and the food agencies have authorised import and sales. 

Then there are the non-English-speaking Western countries, and the European Union, in particular, which have felt the need to have rules and provide approvals before allowing any marketing. 
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Farming Edible Bugs with Robotics and AI To Alleviate Global Food Insecurity | Horizons: Family Office & Investor Magazine

Farming Edible Bugs with Robotics and AI To Alleviate Global Food Insecurity | Horizons: Family Office & Investor Magazine | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
"No business today can meaningfully exist in the next decade without a clear digitization strategy and a whole-hearted embrace of technology," he tells Horizons. "I believe the greatest investment opportunities in the next decade will focus on companies solving some of the world's most perplexing challenges using advanced technologies. I am especially excited about the role of technology in food and agriculture."
For Ashour, the use of automation means being able to set up new farms quickly and achieving return goals without sacrificing product quality. Despite the unusual source material, Ashour points out that his operations could be a use case for future sustainable farming projects. "Insects are the cleanest source of animal protein in the world, requiring far less land, water, and energy than any other conventional form of livestock," he says.
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Insect Food Company Aspire Acquires Cricket Protein Bar Maker Exo

Insect Food Company Aspire Acquires Cricket Protein Bar Maker Exo | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Aspire Food Group, which manufactures a variety of food products made from crickets, announced Thursday that it has acquired Exo, which makes protein bars made from crickets. The acquisition is effective as of today.

Interestingly, Aspire cofounders Mohammed Ashour and Shobhita Soor and Exo cofounders Greg Sewitz and Gabi Lewis were all members of Forbes 30 Under 30 list in 2016. And it was that Under 30 connection that helped lead to the deal being made.

"Greg and I first talked about this at the Under 30 Summit in Boston," Ashour told me.
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Ovipost wants to help drop the labor cost of building cricket farms

Ovipost wants to help drop the labor cost of building cricket farms | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Trina Chiasson says a lot of cricket farmers will talk about how figuring out when they are laying their eggs is an art — and she hopes to turn it into a science.

She and her co-founder James Ricci started Ovipost, a new startup looking to optimize the right conditions for a cricket grower to get the most yield from a generation of eggs without having to lose a bunch of crickets in the process. At its heart, Ovipost is aimed at being a set of tools that will help farmers figure out the best way to optimize their cricket yield by managing initial problems, like the proper volume of cricket eggs, as well as traditional problems cricket farmers face. The end goal is to reduce the overall labor cost, taking the process from less of an art — and listening for the right song — to more one that farmers can augment with technology. Ovipost is launching out of Y Combinator’s winter class this year.

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Cricket protein companies combine | 2018-03-08 | Food Business News

Cricket protein companies combine | 2018-03-08 | Food Business News | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
AUSTIN, TEXAS — Aspire Food Group, a company specializing in edible insect farming technology, has acquired Exo, maker of cricket-based protein bars. The merger will combine Exo’s product line into Aspire’s data-driven farming operations and supply chain to “create new products and fuel the future growth of both customer bases and the larger industry in general,” Aspire said. Financial terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

Exo manufactures paleo friendly, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free and grain-free protein bars made with cricket flour. Available in cocoa nut, banana bread, PB & J, blueberry vanilla and apple cinnamon flavors, the bars deliver 10 grams of protein each.
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The Impossible Burger, Algae, Kernza, Crickets, and Other Future Foods You Won't Believe

The Impossible Burger, Algae, Kernza, Crickets, and Other Future Foods You Won't Believe | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
What You’ll Be Eating: Cricket flour
How You’ll Be Eating It: Energy bars, chips, and other processed foods

There are only hints of it on grocery store shelves, but cricket powder is rapidly gaining ground in Western foods. Whole crickets are staple snacks in many countries—on the Indonesian island of Java they are battered and fried as rempeyek, while Thailand’s ching rit are merely fried—but the idea of eating bugs has been a slow sell in the North American market.

From an environmental perspective, the appeal of bugs—particularly crickets—is clear. Crickets offer more protein and micronutrients per pound than beef. They thrive in dark, densely crowded conditions, so they can be farmed vertically, allowing for large-scale production on a tiny footprint. They produce relatively little waste, avoiding the manure lagoons that plague hog and cattle farms.
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EDITORIAL: Getting used to the idea | Editorials | Opinion | The News

EDITORIAL: Getting used to the idea | Editorials | Opinion | The News | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Probably the last time anybody out there ate a bug it was the result of a double dog dare. But as it turns out, that bug is better for you than, oh, say, a Tide pod or something.

All joking and yuck factor aside, insects of certain kinds could well start to become a part of our daily diets. They already are in some parts of the world, and in fact are making a showing in Canada.


Loblaw Companies Ltd. are adding a new President’s Choice product in their stores called cricket powder, and it’s not just a clever name for something else, it is as it sounds. This is a flour made of crickets that is high in protein and other nutrients.

For those who are religious about checking their weekly flyers, the product was advertised the other week in the Superstore flyers and is indeed already available in the health food section of the New Glasgow store.

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Classic British dishes under threat due to climate change WWF warns | Daily

Classic British dishes under threat due to climate change WWF warns | Daily | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Warmer seas could see populations of cod – which has long been the staple in fish and chips meals - displaced by other species such as anchovies, WWF said. 

Chicken may suffer from worse welfare as the world warms and will have to be fed on alternatives such as algae and insects if soy production is hit by higher temperatures and changes to rainfall, ending the era of cheap chicken.
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Bugs on the menu at Lifelong Learning series event | Community | dailystarjournal.com

Bugs on the menu at Lifelong Learning series event | Community | dailystarjournal.com | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

The University of Central Missouri's Lifelong Learning series will present the program "Wilder Edibles: If You Can’t Beat ‘Em, Eat ‘Em" at 6 p.m. Thursday, April 12, in the meeting room at Trail’s Regional Library, 432 N. Holden St.

Paul Landkamer, a Missouri Master Naturalist whose recipes have appeared in the book "Edible: An Adventure into the World of Eating Insects" and Time.Com’s "20 Delicious Bug Recipes from Chefs," will lead the session.

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Bug Nutrition - Nutrition Facts For Crickets

Bug Nutrition - Nutrition Facts For Crickets | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
One of the world’s most common and nutritious food sources has been ignored for decades in the United States and many other prominent countries. This source of sustenance has even been considered taboo in those nations, despite being a common part of the average diet in 80% of the world’s population.

This mystery food?

It’s bugs. Yes, we mean it.

Edible insects have been a part of human diets for centuries, and for most of the world they never left the table. Given the incredible nutritional value packed into the most commonly eaten insects, it’s kind of surprising that eating bugs hasn’t been the centerpiece of a hit fad diet already.
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Start-up focus: Taking insect protein into America’s snacks pantries

FoodIngredientsFirst: What were the main challenges you faced?
Chirps Chips: In food, nothing is easy. There have been challenges at different stages and we have had challenges at every stage – I think that’s what happens when you start a completely new food category. Firstly, we had to approach 400 manufacturers before finding one that would work with us. We had to work with the State Health Department for nine months in Massachusetts before they gave us the go-ahead to use cricket powder. It also took a while to get the formulation right; ultimately it has to be a great tasting product.
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Eating Insects Could Be the Future of Culinary Innovation

Eating Insects Could Be the Future of Culinary Innovation | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Here in the U.S., we tend not think of insects as food, and are horrified when they turn up in food. Though finding a bug in one's meal is often cause for alarm and disgust, the laws around U.S. food standards recognize that bugs making their way into what we eat is simply a fact of life.

FDA regulations known as the "Food Defect Action Levels" allow certain enumerated amounts and types of insects to be present in many foods. Take frozen orange juice. FDA rules specify that frozen orange juice is acceptable for sale if it contains fewer than "5 or more [fruit fly] and other fly eggs per 250 ml or 1 or more maggots per 250 ml."
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COMMENTARY: Youth far more likely to be vegetarians

COMMENTARY: Youth far more likely to be vegetarians | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Canadians love meat. Many of us have been dedicated to our favourite protein source for years.

But other sources of protein are emerging as potent alternatives to animal protein. Demand is up for vegetable proteins like pulses, as well as for fish and seafood. Loblaw has even started selling cricket flour and is trying to make insect consumption mainstream. As a result, some believe vegetarianism and veganism may be on the rise in Canada.
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Insects for dinner? These foodies bring bugs to your table - WSMV News 4

Insects for dinner? These foodies bring bugs to your table - WSMV News 4 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
(AP/Meredith) -- We're used to avoiding or swatting them, but few of us in the Western world choose to put insects in our mouths.

Two Italian women are now introducing diners to the joy of eating bugs at their home, and they claim they are a delicious and sustainable choice.

Walking from fridge to counter, Giulia Tacchini looks like any other cook rustling up a meal at home.

But look closer at the contents of the bowl and you'll notice something more often seen in the forest than on the dinner plate.

They're crickets and they're just one of many types of bugs going into this meal in Milan, Italy.
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Cricket farmer pleased to see products in grocery stores

Cricket farmer pleased to see products in grocery stores | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

The owner of North America's first human-grade insect farm said he is hoping a recent announcement from one of the country's biggest retailers will have a big impact on his business.

Jarrod Goldin, with Entomo Farms in Southern Ontario, said he was very excited when he heard Loblaw Companies Ltd. would be adding cricket powder to its lineup of President's Choice products. The crickets used in the President's Choice powder will be sourced from Goldin's farm.

"When you have a Loblaws or a President's Choice, with a trusted brand that people know and love, put their brand behind the category, it's a game changer," Goldin said.

In a statement, Loblaw said the cricket flour is high in protein and packed with vitamins and minerals. Cricket powder also has a "neutral flavour," making it a versatile ingredient for many kinds of recipes. Crickets are also more sustainable than other forms of animal protein, because they require less food and water.

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Ovipost

We make tools for insect farms

Ovipost is a team of entomologists, engineers, and entrepreneurs who believe in a healthy and sustainable future.

Hundreds of thousands of insect producers around the globe grow sustainable protein for human food and animal feed, beneficial insects for chemical-free pest control, and research organisms for scientific discovery. We build technology to help insect farms reduce costs, scale production, and help the planet.

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Free ice cream with bugs at Manly Wharf | News Local

Free ice cream with bugs at Manly Wharf | News Local | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
FREE ice cream is being handed out in Manly this Sunday.
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Not a bug: insect 'novel food' fines vary widely across EU

Not a bug: insect 'novel food' fines vary widely across EU | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Food companies selling unauthorised 'novel foods' made from insects or algae face substantially different penalties depending on the EU country where they operate.
An access to documents request by EUobserver revealed that small businesses in the Netherlands would be given a €525 fine, while the potential punishment in Slovakia is anywhere between €1,000 and €500,000.


Outside Europe, for example in Thailand, bugs are part of a normal diet. (Photo: Barnaby Dorfman)
It also showed that member states had not informed the commission of their fines, until asked by this website.

Companies that want to sell a novel food product – generally speaking food types that were not widely consumed before 15 May 1997 – are obliged to check if the product is on the EU list of authorised products.
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Crickets for breakfast? Loblaw taps bugs as the latest food trend

Crickets for breakfast? Loblaw taps bugs as the latest food trend | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Loblaw is banking that powder made from milled crickets will be the next big protein-packed food source to enrich morning smoothies across Canada

TORONTO — Move over, chia seeds — Loblaw Cos. Ltd. is banking that powder made from milled crickets will be the next big protein-packed food source to enrich morning smoothies across Canada.

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Major Grocery Store Now Selling Edible Insects | Mississauga | insauga.com

Major Grocery Store Now Selling Edible Insects | Mississauga | insauga.com | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Farmed at a cricket farm in Canada, Loblaws says the unusual product answers the need for "great tasting" and sustainable protein.
“With our President’s Choice brand we’re always looking to bring the new and the next to Canadians,” says Kathlyne Ross, VP of product development and innovation at Loblaw. “By making products like Cricket Powder widely available in our grocery stores, we are giving Canadians the option to not only try something new, but to also make a conscious decision on what they eat and how it impacts the environment.”
While this product will definitely turn heads, insect protein is actually pretty popular in other parts of the world.
In fact, Loblaws says 80 per cent of the world’s population already incorporates insects into their diet in some form.
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