Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Worm: the Other Red Meat | OnEarth Magazine

Worm: the Other Red Meat | OnEarth Magazine | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

For a semester-ending celebration, the professor in my undergraduate entomology class served us up plates of termite cookies, chocolate-covered crickets, and spicy fried mealworms.

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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
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Popular Swiss insect burgers fly off the shelves |

Popular Swiss insect burgers fly off the shelves | | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Geneva — A Swiss supermarket chain has started selling burgers and balls made from insects, a move being billed as a legal first in Europe.

Seven of Coop's nearly 2 500 stores in Switzerland are serving up the critter concoctions from Zurich-based food startup Essento. A broader launch is planned by year's end.

The bug burgers are made of rice, chopped vegetables, spices and mealworm larvae.
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Could edible termites be next on the menu? | Cape Argus

Could edible termites be next on the menu? | Cape Argus | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Cape Town - Rich in proteins, fats, vitamins and nutrients, termites may prove to be a food alternative for many South Africans.
PHD student Shandukani Netshifhefhe said many studies had been conducted on edible insects, and that termites were being underutilised.

He said the Western Cape was rich in termites, but added that he was not sure which were edible.

“I grew up in very rural areas and we grew up avoiding them, and I thought let me do this and maybe one day when I am gone other generations will be able to use this.”

His study, published in the South African Journal of Science last week, showed that edible termites contributed significantly to the livelihoods of many rural families in parts of South Africa.


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Edible Insects Market Size - Industry Share Report 2023

Edible Insects Market Size - Industry Share Report 2023 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Shift in focus towards adopting bug consumption for both human and animal is likely to drive global edible insects market. Increase in bugs consumption owing to growing health concerns and avoiding unhealthy foods may favor product demand. Bugs finds applications animal feed mainly in poultry and fish.
 
It is estimated that one hectare of land could produce at least 150 tons of insect protein per year. Eatable bug production may increase over the due course, particularly in U.S., UK, China, and Brazil. Consumer awareness regarding health benefits and rising application in food industry has led to increase in edible insects market growth. Climate change has a major role over desired product farming.
 
Nutritional value bugs includes protein, fibres, dietary energy, minerals, vitamins, and fatty acids. Increase in bug consumption has led to rise in sustainable diet owing to low environmental impact to food and leading healthy life. Sustainable diets are healthy and safe, easily accessible, affordable and nutritious for human consumption.
 
Protein content depends on feed such as vegetables or waste and it varies by species. Bugs have mineral content which is important in biological process. These bugs are rich in iron, zinc, magnesium, sodium and potassium. Consumption of mineral diet has a positive influence in fighting against diseases. Eatable bugs are source of fat, oils are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids. These factors may drive insect proteins market over the forecast timeframe.
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Worldwide Edible Insects Market Size and Forecasts (2016 - 2021)

Worldwide Edible Insects Market Size and Forecasts (2016 - 2021) | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Aug 2016: Arcluster's published market report on the Worldwide Edible Insects Market (2016 - 2021) Edible Insects market insights, analysis & opportunities.
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One Planet Week 2018 –

One Planet Week 2018 – | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Ever wanted to know what bugs taste like? Well, look no further because on Friday 16th February you have the opportunity to try edible insects (and talk about sustainable farming)! You can try this high protein, albeit unusual snack in the Biology Atrium from 10am – 12pm!

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.com | Crunchy Bugs & Grimy Grubs: The Future of Food?

.com | Crunchy Bugs & Grimy Grubs: The Future of Food? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
When you’re looking for a bite-sized snack, what could be better than a tiny, crunchable bug? Probably a lot in my personal opinion, but let’s dive into this crunchy topic anyway. I have never eaten one, but let’s set aside our biases and take this walk down “Ew, That’s Gross Road” together.

Entomophagy. A word you’ve probably heard about as many times as you’ve actually considered eating insects. It is defined as “the human use of insects as food,” and has been a part of human life since our early ancestors traversed the land with stone tools and is still part of many lives today. It could also be a solution to world hunger for the future.
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3 Out of 10 People Would Choose to Eat Insects: Are You One of Them? (Video)

3 Out of 10 People Would Choose to Eat Insects: Are You One of Them? (Video) | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
With many gym goers keen to increase their protein intake, U.K. gym operator PureGym surveyed over 1,000 people to see if they would be interested in jumping on the latest protein trend by adding protein-dense edible insects such as crickets and mealworm into their diets.

The survey revealed that 35 percent of people surveyed would be prepared to try edible bugs and this figure rose to nearly half (47 percent) when it was answered by those who exercised daily. This keenness to try edible bugs and insect products is also reflected in a 29 percent increase in Google search volume for "insect protein powder" over the last year. It would seem that all the bug-eating on ITV's "I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here!" and years of "Fear Factor" haven't put people off insectivorism.
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China silkworm-based snack scoops top innovation accolade ahead of official launch

China silkworm-based snack scoops top innovation accolade ahead of official launch | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

China's first packaged-good insect-based snack food, which is yet to formerly launched on the market, has already scooped a leading innovation accolade.
Bugsolutely's Bella Pupa, a silkworm-based chip, has received The Food and Beverage Innovation Forum’s Most Innovative Food prize.

Bella Pupa was voted number one out of a selection of 54 competitors from different categories, including diary, drink, snack and instant foods.

The product is made with 26% silkworm powder and has been created by serial entrepreneur Massimo Reverberi, along with a team of Chinese and French food designers and food scientists.

It was one of a handful of projects to be backed by Shanghai-based food accelerator Bits x Bites.

However, despite the innovation award success, Reverberi told us he was still trying to clear regulatory hurdles to officially launch the product in China.

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Mealworm farming made easy: grow a new protein source that's eco-friendly with hive from Hong Kong start-up

Mealworm farming made easy: grow a new protein source that's eco-friendly with hive from Hong Kong start-up | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Katharina Unger is founder and CEO of Livin Farms, a start-up that produces a system called a hive to harvest mealworms in the home. She didn’t always have an affinity for bugs let alone have them populate her plate. When the industrial designer came to Hong Kong, she saw that most of the food is imported and began to look at alternatives.
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Crickets are food of the future, says university entomologist:

Crickets are food of the future, says university entomologist: | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Would you like crickets with your “takoyaki”? The deep-fried octopus balls and other dishes could soon be served up like that if Taro Mito gets his way.

Two-spotted crickets, when freeze-dried and pulverized, taste “great” as a topping, according to Mito. The entomologist is ambitious to promote the use of the insects, which measure around 2 centimeters long, as food for humans.

Mito, 46, an associate professor with Tokushima University, is working with a colleague in hopes of setting up, as early as this summer, a university venture for developing and marketing cricket powder and processed foodstuffs made of it.

No products will have a “buggy” feel to avoid putting off potential consumers, said Mito, who was fond of collecting insects and other creatures as a boy when growing up in Tokyo and Chiba Prefecture.
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The world will fail to achieve the SDGs—here's how business can fix that

The world will fail to achieve the SDGs—here's how business can fix that | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
To advance SDG 12 on responsible consumption and production, solutions such as the circular economy—where resources are recovered and reused at the end of the product’s life cycle rather than discarded as waste—and dramatically different lifestyle choices such as insect protein need to be scaled up, the report recommended. 

For the latter trend, the global market for edible insects was US$33 million in 2015, but is expected to soar to US$773 million by 2024, the report predicted, calling this alternative food source “a breakthrough market to watch”. Examples of companies already cashing in on this trend include Chirps Chips, a US-based firm which makes cookies and chips from cricket flour; and BiteBack, an Indonesian firm which extracts oil from edible insects as a sustainable alternative to palm oil. The latter commodity has long been linked to driving deforestation and habitat loss in Indonesia and other tropical nations where it is cultivated. 
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Taste-testing crickets – a gateway bug to a diet of insects

Taste-testing crickets – a gateway bug to a diet of insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
To many, the idea of eating insects is repulsive. But, as Helen King discovered, there were some crunchy surprises at her neighbourhood restaurant.

Biting into a cricket, the first thing you notice is the crunchiness. Then a small burst of flavour before it dissolves to dust in your mouth. 

The offer of a snack of bugs elicited mostly responses of horror around the Stuff office. Those who were willing to try the unusual snack gingerly took a bite. Most were nonplussed, once they moved past the fact they were eating insects. 
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People should have no problem digesting bugs. But will anyone eat them?

People should have no problem digesting bugs. But will anyone eat them? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insects move weirdly. They're sort of alien, in a way. And while insects aren't really that different from shrimp or lobster—which people will pay handsomely to serve at fancy parties—most Westerners don't really want to think about getting protein from bugs. But here's the thing: The United Nations estimates that around two billion people across the globe regularly eat bugs (at least 1,900 species are considered edible and nutritious), which are far more ecologically sustainable than other forms of animal protein, and which happen to contain healthy fats, protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals.
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On printability, quality and nutritional properties of 3D printed cereal based snacks enriched with edible insects

On printability, quality and nutritional properties of 3D printed cereal based snacks enriched with edible insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Abstract
3D printing technology was employed to obtain snacks with a designed cylindrical geometry from wheat flour dough enriched by ground larvae of Yellow mealworms (Tenebrio molitor) as novel source of proteins. The main microstructural features, overall quality, and nutritional attributes were studied as a function of formulation, time and temperature of baking. The addition of ground insects up to 20 g/100 g (d.b.) resulted in softer dough. This caused an overflow in dough deposition producing the increase in diameter, height and weight of snacks. Baking conditions did not alter the overall aspect of the snacks, but modification of the main dimensional and microstructure attributes were observed due to the better water evaporation. The optimization of baking conditions found that 22 min and 200 °C allowed obtaining a maximum desirability of 0.693. Baked in these conditions, the printed snacks enriched with 10 and 20% of ground insects significantly increased the total essential amino acid, from 32.5 (0% insects) to 38.2 and 41.3 g/100 g protein, respectively.
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Edible Insect Status in Europe 2018

Edible Insect Status in Europe 2018 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
There is confusion in the European markets as to what insects are legal in what countries. Anders Engstrom's chart helps make sense of it all.
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Press: Inagro takes new research spaces for insect breeding into use 

Ana C. Day's insight:

Three years after the start-up of small-scale research into the possibilities of professional insect breeding, the culture is being pumped at Inagro. On January 30, the practice center officially put its new breeding cells into use. Some 170 stakeholders from the sector gathered in Beitem to discover the novelties. Thanks to the modern infrastructure, the research can grow to an adult stage in a professional breeding environment. This focuses on the automation and use of waste flows.

Using opportunities with insects 
The possibilities with insects are numerous and are still increasing. The little creatures are great waste processors. In addition, they contain high-quality proteins, fats and minerals, which can form a sustainable alternative to human food and animal feed. Industrial oils can also be extracted from industrial separation processes.

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Entomophagy Special Interest Group

Entomophagy Special Interest Group | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

"Insects as Food and Feed - 2018 workshop." Venue: Royal Agricultural University, Stroud Road, Cirencester, GL7 6JS There will be a shuttle bus available in the morning and evening from Kemble train station. Please could you contact James Wright james.wright@multibox.farm with your estimated time of arrival so that we can schedule the bus accordingly. Keynote speaker: TBC AGENDA

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Cisco's John Chambers wants everyone to eat crickets

Cisco's John Chambers wants everyone to eat crickets | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Former Cisco CEO John Chambers says we'll all be eating insects in 10 years.

"The next form of protein will be cricket power," Chambers told CNBC's "Squawk Alley" Friday.

"We're running out of geographic area to even grow the meat products and the agriculture products as the population expands worldwide," he said. "The damage you do to the environment when you produce a pound of beef — and I'm a roast beef guy — is seven times what you do if you [farm] through robotic cricket farming capability."

Chambers is an investor in robotic cricket farm operator Aspire Food Group. The company uses "proprietary sensor technology and internet-of-things to capture real-time data on our insects," according to its website.
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Insekten | Swiss Food Research

Insekten | Swiss Food Research | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Swiss Food Research
Ana C. Day's insight:

4th Meeting of the Innovation Group Insects - 18 April 2018

For registration

In the field of insects, the research topics are being worked on for and with the developing industry.

The focus here is on the entire processing chain from breeding to "consumption".
The use of insects is primarily considered as food in the context of the use .

In the field of food for humans, insects are currently in the approval phase in Switzerland. Within Europe, especially Belgium, the development is already on. This opens up opportunities to develop technologies and methods that can be tested and marketed in other countries.

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Ants in your pans – can I get the bug for eating insects? | Life and style | The Guardian

Ants in your pans – can I get the bug for eating insects? | Life and style | The Guardian | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Shortly before his Super Bowl performance on Sunday, Justin Timberlake held a listening party for Man of the Woods, his new forest-themed album. As journalists listened to songs about flannel, they were served woodsy canapes, including grasshoppers and fried ants. The caterer was Noma founder René Redzepi, king of the weird and foraged, who had been hauled out of his kitchen – Noma 2 opens this month in Copenhagen – to frighten the music industry.

Does the return of Noma suggest that edible ants are back? Promoted as part of the sustainable-food drive, insects are often discussed, but rarely eaten. Ants suffer particularly short shrift, probably because they are small, bitter and viewed as a novelty for events such as expensive album launches. They contain protein, but in the meritocracy of sustainability they pale in comparison to the I’m a Celebrity classic, the witchetty grub, which is high in protein and vitamin C and tastes like almonds.

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Save the planet, eat an insect

Save the planet, eat an insect | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
People sometimes get bugged by insects, but we need them. They play essential roles in pollination, combatting unwanted agricultural pests, recycling organic matter, feeding fish, birds and bats, and much more. They’re the most numerous and diverse animals on Earth and form the base of many terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

Our admiration for these critters goes beyond their ability to adapt, their fantastically diverse colours and shapes, and their accomplishments that create dramatic impacts on our world’s functioning.

David Suzuki asks: Could insects revolutionize the way we eat and produce food?
Could the same six-legged creatures that form the backbone of ecosystem services also help minimize humanity's environmental footprint? Could insects revolutionize the way we eat and produce food?
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Science Matters Column: Bugs for lunch?

Science Matters Column: Bugs for lunch? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
People sometimes get bugged by insects, but we need them. They play essential roles in pollination, combatting unwanted agricultural pests, recycling organic matter, feeding fish, birds and bats, and much more. They’re the most numerous and diverse animals on Earth and form the base of many terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

Our admiration for these critters goes beyond their ability to adapt, their fantastically diverse colours and shapes, and their accomplishments that create dramatic impacts on our world’s functioning.

Could the same six-legged creatures that form the backbone of ecosystem services also help minimize humanity's environmental footprint? Could insects revolutionize the way we eat and produce food?

We will be nine billion people on Earth in 2050. To feed that many, we should double food production, according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization. But the way we currently produce food weighs heavily on the environment.
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Eat Bugs? Call Them Cheap, Nutritious Lobsters

Eat Bugs? Call Them Cheap, Nutritious Lobsters | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
By Robert Preidt

HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Feb. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The next time you see a grasshopper, try to imagine it as a snack.

If might help if you know that insects are nutritious and digestible.

"For a long time the prevailing wisdom was that mammals didn't produce an enzyme that could break down the exoskeletons of insects, so they were considered to be very difficult to digest," researcher Mareike Janiak said.

But Janiak and her colleagues at Rutgers University in New Jersey say that's not so.

They found that most primates -- including humans -- have at least one working copy of a gene called CHIA. That's the stomach enzyme that breaks down an insect's outer shell, or exoskeleton.

Their study was published recently in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution.
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Why eating insects won't end world hunger

Why eating insects won't end world hunger | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Plenty has been said about insects as an alternative source of protein with environmental benefits. And for good reason. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations predicts that by 2050 the world population will be 9.1 billion, which they say will require us to increase food production by 70 per cent. And as early as 2013, the FAO started promoting insects as an "unexplored nutrition source that can help address global food insecurity."

So naturally, entrepreneurs have begun lining up to sell insects to Canadians as an environmentally friendly cure-all, from Coast Cricket Protein (whose website claims, "Crickets leave a much lower impact on the planet than other protein sources") in British Columbia, Crickstart ("supersustainable") and Entomo Farms ("the planet's most sustainable super-food") in Ontario, to Midgard Insect Farm ("the next big thing in pet food") in Nova Scotia.
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Hot Dogs, Pizza, and Grasshoppers? The Rising Demand for Edible Insects in Chicago

Hot Dogs, Pizza, and Grasshoppers? The Rising Demand for Edible Insects in Chicago | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Feeling a little peaked? How about a plate laden with grasshoppers or fried silkworm caterpillars? Insects have wiggled their way into onto menus in New York City, Denver, and Los Angeles, and now, they’re also what’s for lunch in Chicago restaurants such as Mi Tocaya Antojería, a neighborhood Mexican restaurant opened in 2017 by acclaimed chef, Diana Dávila.

Interest in entomophagy—the eating of insects—is nothing new to the roughly two billion people around the world who incorporate them into their diets. In North America, insects have been used in gastronomy since pre-Hispanic times, and Dávila believes that by adding chapulines, or grasshoppers, to her restaurant’s dishes such as venison with a burnt orange salsa, she is representing her Mexican roots.
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Insects on the menu | All media content | DW | 01.02.2018

Insects on the menu | All media content | DW | 01.02.2018 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Locust lunch
With the global population increasing and the supply of agricultural land under threat — around a third of the world's arable land has been lost in the last 40 years — pressure is being put on the world's food supply. Then there is the strain meat production places on the environment. Many believe insects — such as the locust eaten here with an egg by a man in Tokyo — are a credible alternative.
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