Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Popular Swiss insect burgers fly off the shelves |

Popular Swiss insect burgers fly off the shelves | | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Geneva — A Swiss supermarket chain has started selling burgers and balls made from insects, a move being billed as a legal first in Europe.

Seven of Coop's nearly 2 500 stores in Switzerland are serving up the critter concoctions from Zurich-based food startup Essento. A broader launch is planned by year's end.

The bug burgers are made of rice, chopped vegetables, spices and mealworm larvae.
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EMEA (Europe, Middle East and Africa) Animal Feed Protein Market:...

EMEA (Europe, Middle East and Africa) Animal Feed Protein Market:... | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
EMEA (Europe, Middle East and Africa) Animal Feed Protein (Thousands Units) and Revenue (Million USD) Market Split by Product Type such as Insect Meal, Algae, Fish Meal Replacers . Further the research study is segmented by Application such as Farming, Household, Other with historical and projected market share and compounded annual growth rate.
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European Commission : CORDIS : News and Events : Breaking barriers to the uptake of insects as food source

European Commission : CORDIS : News and Events : Breaking barriers to the uptake of insects as food source | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
An abundant food source in a time of food insecurity, just one snag – how can we break the ‘yuck’ barrier and get insects onto our plates?
© Charoenkrung.Studio99, Shutterstock
Insects are high in protein, can be raised with less impact on natural resources than the demands made by conventional farming and in great quantities. But there are no clear regulations in place to get them into our food chain and challenges remain when it comes to uptake – one EU project’s findings are helping to construct the bigger picture.
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FDIN | UK Food & Drink Industry news & events, seminars, and conferences. - The Food & Drink Innovation Network

FDIN | UK Food & Drink Industry news & events, seminars, and conferences. - The Food & Drink Innovation Network | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Source: Nutrition.org.uk

Headlines claiming “eating insects is the future of food” and asking “are edible insects the next superfood?” have been appearing in recent years. According to researchers at Wageningen University, some 2,000 edible species are known to exist and are eaten by an estimated quarter of the world’s population. However, insects are not traditionally part of Western diets.

Why the interest in eating insects?

Dietary choices not only impact on dividual health, but also have significant implications for the health of the planet. Our food system contributes significantly to climate change through greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; and impacts negatively on ecosystems, including through deforestation, water use, overfishing, pollution and biodiversity loss. Traditional sources of protein, such as meat and dairy foods, are recognised as having a high environmental footprint.

So how can we meet the protein needs of a growing global population in a way that is affordable, healthy and good for the environment? Could insects be part of a more sustainable future?

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Chinese blockchain chickens and a cricket farm to feed the world - The Sociable

Chinese blockchain chickens and a cricket farm to feed the world - The Sociable | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Producing the appropriate environment for crickets on such a large scale might seeming challenging at first, however, if successful, the benefits could be huge. Pound for pound, crickets, and edible insects in general, produce the highest ROI for food, from the planet’s resources. For example, crickets need just 1.5 pounds of feed for every pound of edible cricket product made.
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Edible insects and food sustainability

Edible insects and food sustainability | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Could edible insects play an important role in tackling a growing global humanitarian problem?

Liliane Binego, who has eaten wild edible insects since childhood, believes that the a diet of grasshoppers and locusts could be the answer. While she’s always found them delicious, she knows not everyone shares her view. But the facts are they provide an excellent source of protein and are already a delicacy in some tropical countries, where they are often also a lucrative source of income.
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Symposium Edible Insects

Symposium Edible Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A global protein shortage might arise in the future. How can we face this increasing challenge of nutrition security? Insects offer a high quality, efficient and sustainable alternative, and have the capacity to valorize organic side streams. As such, insects can close the loop in a circular economy.
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Will Atlanta restaurants soon serve insects? This scientist hopes so.

Will Atlanta restaurants soon serve insects? This scientist hopes so. | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Chelsea Thomas cuts celery stalks into bite-sized pieces and slathers each with peanut butter. A few dozen kids and their dutiful parents have taken seats in the Atlanta Botanical Garden’s outdoor kitchen, where the 27-year-old is demonstrating how to make “ants on a log.” She picks up a vial the size of a blood sample and removes the lid to extract her secret ingredient: actual ants, lightly roasted.

“Have you tasted them before?” one boy asks. “Yes,” Thomas, who is wearing a dress printed with ladybugs, answers before assuring him that they’re “yummy.”
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2018's Biggest Food Trends—And How to Incorporate Them at Your Wedding

2018's Biggest Food Trends—And How to Incorporate Them at Your Wedding | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
It's that time of year again: With New Year's resolutions underway, everyone's scoping out predictions for the biggest 2018 food trends so they can get healthy and stay relevant at the same time. Luckily for all of us, Whole Foods gathered their food experts and buyers to create a list of what they expect will be the most popular foods this year.
In case you're having trouble envisioning trendy foods being part of your wedding plans (edible insects made this list last year...ick), we'll give you an idea of how each item on this list can help keep your wedding menu on the cutting edge.
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Cricket flour for proteins: are edible insects really the future of healthy eating?

Cricket flour for proteins: are edible insects really the future of healthy eating? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Recently, eating insects has become more than just a trend these days. Even though most people feel grossed out even when thinking about eating insects, there is no denying that this trend is slowly taking over the world. Out of all the other foods prepared with insects what has really become popular is ‘cricket flour’. It is actually four made out of crickets. People have been consuming crickets in countries like Phillippines, Mexico, Thailand, etc. But thanks to online shopping websites you can easily get insect food products and cookbooks even in India.
What exactly is cricket flour or any other insect flour?
Cricket an insect that looks like a grasshopper, known for its
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Novel natural ingredients: Proti-Farm looks to scale up insect production

08 Jan 2018 --- The demand for natural and specialty foods has increased dramatically in recent years and is expected to continue to rise even further in the near future. Meeting this demand may require producers to take a closer look at “alternative” ingredients. Among the various novel “natural” ingredients that are available, ingredients derived from insects in various forms are now seen as “the new kid on the block” taking their place alongside algae, seaweed and legumes.

In July last year, new novel food implementing rules have the support of insect producers. The International Platform of Insects for Food & Feed (IPIFF) welcomed the EU’s recent publication of a package of proposals setting out detailed requirements for the European Union’s “novel food” legislation. The IPIFF federation now seeks rapid adoption of these new rules.
 
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In the future, insects could save us from hunger, scientists say

In the future, insects could save us from hunger, scientists say | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Twenty years since cricket farming became a legitimate industry, Thailand has started to export crickets to the US and Europe – not so much as a food item, but as cricket powder, an ingredient for things like energy bars, cookies, and even crackers.

“Cricket powder contains 70 percent protein,” says Rahael Samozino, co-founder of  Eco Insect Farming. “There are a lot of vitamins, iron, omega.”

Samozino continues, “crickets consume less water and only require a small space.”
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Campbell: These trends will shape 2018 cooking - ROI-NJ

Campbell: These trends will shape 2018 cooking - ROI-NJ | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

New Jersey, with its $105 billion food industry and agriculture sector, nearly 1,900 food manufacturing companies and thousands of food distribution centers, retailers, restaurants and farms, should pay close attention to these particular food trends in 2018:

Culinary Heritage: Personal, authentic stories and traditions will continue to define the food that we love to eat.
Feel-good Treats: People want to eat healthier, nutrient-dense indulgences, such as fortified ice cream, vegetable desserts, protein-packed chips and mood-enhancing ingredients.
Meat: While Meatless Mondays and plant-based diets are on the rise, there is still a strong interest in utilizing unique butcher cuts and antibiotic-free meat options.
Alternative Options: The future of food includes options that meet a wide variety of dietary needs, including products such as non-dairy milk, cricket flour and lab-cultured burgers.

Ana C. Day's insight:

"Alternative Options: The future of food includes options that meet a wide variety of dietary needs, including products such as non-dairy milk, cricket flour and lab-cultured burgers."

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Insects could be the next hot ingredient used by European restaurants

Insects could be the next hot ingredient used by European restaurants | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insects might soon become the next favourite ingredient in European dishes. 

A new set of EU rules allowing insect food to be sold in the European Union market came into force on January 1. 

Everyone from cricket farmers to producers of insect protein bars will be happy to learn that the new directive - called the 'novel foods regulation' centralises standards, making it easier for EU food businesses to sell insects in the bloc's market.

Previously, rules on insect food were left to each member state to decide, making it difficult for the European insect industry to unite behind a unified regulation.

Insect-food applications will now be handled by the European Commission. The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) will provide safety evaluations to determine whether the product meets food safety requirements enforced by the EU.
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New EU rules put insects on the menu

New EU rules put insects on the menu | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
When Italian authorities discovered that Roberto Flore was planning to serve bee larvae on toast at an event in Milan, they shut it down.

But only days before, in Brussels, the Sardinian chef had fed members of the European Parliament his signature lunch without a hitch.

Flore — the head of culinary research at the Nordic Food Lab, which was set up by the head chef at Copenhagen’s world-renowned restaurant Noma — had fallen victim to the tangle of differing national regulations that governed bug eating in Europe until the beginning of this year.

The entomophages of this world don’t have to worry about the bureaucrats in various European capitals anymore.
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New EU rules put insects on the menu

New EU rules put insects on the menu | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Experts see creepy-crawlies as a protein-rich alternative to environmentally unfriendly meat.
By EMMET LIVINGSTONE 1/14/18, 4:00 PM CET Updated 1/15/18, 2:43 PM CET
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BVL - Press and background information - Edible insects: disgust food or food of the future?

BVL - Press and background information - Edible insects: disgust food or food of the future? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Edible insects: disgust food or food of the future?

A new EU regulation includes the existing legal gap

Mealworm burgers, grilling pesto or grasshoppers on skewers: What is long life in other countries, in Europe a relatively new trend - insects as food. But how to ensure at such novel foods that it no health risk to consumers run out? Since January 1 this year there is clarity here, such as the Federal Office of Consumer Protection and Food Safety ( BVL ) announced in Berlin. A new European regulation governs how edible insects can come on our plates.

Insects are eaten naturally in many parts of the world. They are considered rich in protein and have a budget for humans nutrient composition. The attitude speaks for insects. You need far less food than conventional meat suppliers and produce only a fraction of the greenhouse gases that produce about cattle. Insects can cope so far are considered food of the future and a real alternative to conventional meat products.

At the same time the use of insects as food raises many questions, because insect is not the same insect. Worldwide, there are an estimated 1,900 edible insect species. Before they end up in German supermarket shelves, potential toxicological and microbiological risks must be explored and evaluated. Likewise, the question of the allergenic potential of an insect has to be clarified (there is evidence of cross-allergenicity with shellfish). A health risk assessment is necessary for any insect species - before it reaches the consumer.
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Chamber of commerce supporting local students and New Food - The Leader Newspaper

Chamber of commerce supporting local students and New Food - The Leader Newspaper | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

At the event there were 9 different stands with 9 different products, each developed by teams of 4 students. The products included delicious crisps made from sweet potato, a low-fat sugar-free ice cream made from cabbage and dates, a tasty low-fat pork pate with quinoa, a sweet pomegranate sauce for meats, gnocchi pasta made from sweet potato and beetroot, a wholesome crunchy bar consisting of chia, quinoa, dates, rice and oats, a sugar-free sweet flan with chia, pomegranate and 50% less egg, , a spicy meat roll with a redberry sauce, and finally a (sugar-free palm oil-free) cricket flour chocolate paste with sweet potato and dates.

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Sustainable Forests for Food Security and Nutrition

Sustainable Forests for Food Security and Nutrition | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Wood is used by about one-third of the world’s population to cook their food, while 750 million people use wood to boil water to make it safe for drinking. In economic terms, the sale of wood and non-wood products is valued at approximately US$730 billion globally, providing about 80 million people with an income. Moreover, forest foods are a regular part of rural diets and serve as safety nets in times of food scarcity. They include wild foods foraged from forests, which provide nourishment for millions of rural people, and wild animals and edible insects from forests which are often the main source of protein. Much of the world’s accessible fresh water comes from forested watersheds and wetlands, which supply 75 percent of domestic, agricultural, industrial, and ecological needs.
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Understanding the ‘yuck factor’ is crucial to increasing society’s acceptance of insect protein

Understanding the ‘yuck factor’ is crucial to increasing society’s acceptance of insect protein | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Can the “yuck factor” — one of the biggest barriers faced by edible insect producers — be overcome?
It’s that feeling of horror, revulsion or disgust that many consumers endure when they think about eating bug protein.

Obviously, as a manufacturer of pasta containing cricket flour, I have been looking at ways to counter this popular perception of our novel ingredient. To do so, it is important to understand if this feeling of distaste is rationally explainable — if it is innate or learned, dynamic or durable. To begin, let’s look at the appearance of a cricket.

This insect shares many properties with a shrimp. They are a similar size and colour. They have a shell and antennae. While the cricket might be considered as creepy-looking, do we think the same way about a plate of shrimp at a restaurant? Of course not, because we are well used to eating them.

This begs the question of whether the yuck factor is less about appearance and more likely due to unfamiliarity with eating crickets. Is it just a matter of social norms?
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Understanding the ‘yuck factor’ is crucial to increasing society’s acceptance of insect protein

Understanding the ‘yuck factor’ is crucial to increasing society’s acceptance of insect protein | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Can the “yuck factor” — one of the biggest barriers faced by edible insect producers — be overcome?
It’s that feeling of horror, revulsion or disgust that many consumers endure when they think about eating bug protein.

Obviously, as a manufacturer of pasta containing cricket flour, I have been looking at ways to counter this popular perception of our novel ingredient. To do so, it is important to understand if this feeling of distaste is rationally explainable — if it is innate or learned, dynamic or durable. To begin, let’s look at the appearance of a cricket.

This insect shares many properties with a shrimp. They are a similar size and colour. They have a shell and antennae. While the cricket might be considered as creepy-looking, do we think the same way about a plate of shrimp at a restaurant? Of course not, because we are well used to eating them.

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The future of food includes insect cuisine, edible packaging, sea vegetables and more

The future of food includes insect cuisine, edible packaging, sea vegetables and more | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Insect cuisine. Edible packaging. High-tech rooftop gardens. The future of food is around the corner.

With a current world population of 7.2 billion, the United Nations is projecting an increase of 1 billion people over the next 12 years, and 9.6 billion by 2050. To meet the population’s needs, our food system is in transition. We need to produce, transport, sell and prepare more food, more efficiently. But which foods, and what kind of transportation?

It’s the start of a new year and nearly the end of a new decade. We decided it was time to sit down with experts in different segments of our food system to see what their professional prognostication looked like, in their own words. Each interview has been edited for clarity and brevity but reflects the opinions of the experts interviewed.

Strap in; it’s a wild ride.
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Sirius VC, SLJ Investment inject $600K seed funding in Israeli startup Hargol FoodTech

Sirius VC, SLJ Investment inject $600K seed funding in Israeli startup Hargol FoodTech | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Singapore-based venture capital firm Sirius Venture Capital and Netherlands-based SLJ Investment have led a $600,000 seed funding round in Hargol FoodTech, an Israeli startup that pioneered sustainable grasshopper farming to yield consumable protein.

The investment deals sees Wong Hin Sun Eugene, Founder and Managing Director of Sirius VC, will join Hargol’s board.
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Wheat bread with cricket flour

Wheat bread  with cricket flour | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The bread, made from flour ground from dried crickets as well as wheat flour and seeds, contains more protein than normal wheat bread. Each loaf contains about 70 crickets and costs $4.72, compared with about $3.53 for regular wheat loaf. Fazer, a bakery and food service company in Helsinki, Finland, launched recently the world’s first insect-based bread to their consumers. “It offers consumers a good protein source and also gives them an easy way to familiarize themselves with insect-based food,” said Fazer Bakery.

Eating insects, or entomophagy, is common in much of the world. The United Nations estimated last year that at least 2 billion people eat insects and more than 1,900 species have been used for food. In Western countries, edible bugs are gaining traction in niche markets, particularly among those seeking a gluten-free diet or wanting to protect the environment. Farming insects uses less land, water and feed than animal husbandry.
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The insect flour to give your 'new year, new you' regime a protein boost

The insect flour to give your 'new year, new you' regime a protein boost | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Judy and Jeremy Claasen have started selling cricket flour, along with a host of other edible insects, from their new Blenheim store, The Shop That's Not.

Salted-caramel scorpions, barbecued grasshopper and chili chocolate locusts have been flying off the shelves in the Queen's Market Mall store since they opened eight weeks ago.

They sourced their products from Crawlers, based in Auckland, which imports insects and insect products from Thailand.  
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Where to buy edible insects in 2018?

Where to buy edible insects in 2018? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
2018 has arrived, the year of edible insects has begun and we have many surprises for you...

The new year is also the moment for each of us to ask ourselves the objects, to start again in a healthy way after the holidays, to eat better and take care of the body and therefore of the mind.
Energy bars, organic mixes, spirulina and insects can be the right ingredients to achieve these goals.

Our collection of insect products is the most extensive on the web, here you can find all the products. Energy bars, snacks, sweets and flour to prepare tasty healthy dishes in your homes.
Soon other collections will arrive, we have tasted them for you ...
They are really interesting!
Why edible insects?
Because they are good! This is the first answer that comes to mind. Even if the visual impact can stop some, the taste repays.
Because they are good with the planet. Our slogan is Eat the future, save the Planet. Because the speech of environmental sustainability of our products is particularly close to our hearts. Raising insects has a much lower environmental impact than livestock breeding, both in terms of consumption (water, land, etc.) and in terms of waste.
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