Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Reducing the global environmental impact of livestock production: the minilivestock option

Reducing the global environmental impact of livestock production: the minilivestock option | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Highlights

Livestock production is among the most eco-degrading of anthropogenic activities.

Sharply increasing demand for animal protein is set to compound the problem.

The paper deals with a more eco-friendly alternative to livestock–minilivestock.

It is comparable to macrolivestock in terms of protein and other nutrient content.

The enormous potential and the advantages of utilizing minilivestock are described.
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Cory Farley: Insects are coming inevitably to a table near you

Cory Farley: Insects are coming inevitably to a table near you | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Every now and then, an idea comes along that's so world-changingly sensible that the nation instantly rises against it. This is such an idea.
Ana C. Day's insight:

" The Dutch government has invested $780,000 in research and preparing legislation governing “mini-livestock” farms."

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Could caterpillars be the new beef? | VibeGhana.com

A new report by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) calls to eat more insects.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"

Cattle, pigs, chickens and other commercial livestock have been reported to contribute nearly 20 per cent of the global warming gases and use excessive amounts of land and water. Ants, bees, termites, crickets, locusts, caterpillars, beetles and wasps are now being called “mini livestock”. Insect farming has been found to produce far less pollution and environmental impact than traditional farming.

Insect farming is an emerging business opportunity. A South African fly factory recently won a $100,000 UN innovation prize for animal feed. The factory found a way to raise edible insects by feeding them discarded food, manure and meat by-products. The Netherlands has also invested $1.3 million into rearing edible insects from food waste."

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Meat the Food of the Future - Slashdot

Meat the Food of the Future - Slashdot | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Hugh Pickens writes writes "BBC reports that rising food prices, the growing population, and environmental concerns are just a few issues that have food futurologists thinking about what we will eat in the future and how we will eat it.
Ana C. Day's insight:

" As a result we are looking for new ways to fill the meat gap.' Insects will become a staple of our diet. They cost less to raise than cattle, consume less water and do not have much of a carbon footprint. Plus, there are an estimated 1,400 species that are edible to man. 'Things like crickets and grasshoppers will be ground down and used as an ingredient in things like burgers.' But insects will need an image overhaul if they are to become more palatable to the squeamish Europeans and North Americans, says Gaye. 'They will become popular when we get away from the word insects and use something like mini-livestock (PDF)"

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Bugs as Grub

Bugs as Grub | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Entomophagy and minilivestock have become popularized concepts in 80 percent of the world's nations, and their use in developed nations could drastically change the face of farming and agriculture.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"According to the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization, almost 20 percent of greenhouse gas emissions globally are produced by meat production (from factory operation to transportation to feed production to methane gas “released” by livestock like cattle)."

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Lunch with microlivestock

June 15 2013: Entomophagy: it could be a useful income source for small landholders in Gippsland … and according to the UN it might overcome looming global food shortages. Farming insects will be t...
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The Big Apple: Minilivestock

The Big Apple: Minilivestock | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
An etymological dictionary of American words, names, quotations and phrases, including regional dictionaries of New York City, Florida, Oregon and Texas.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Livestock” means farm animals that are domesticated; “minilivestock” (or “mini-livestock") has developed to mean domesticated bugs for edible consumption. “Mini-livestock” has been cited in print since at least 1989, when it meant small livestock. “Microlivestock” was used in 1990 to mean what “minilivestock” now does.

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Here's Why You Should Eat Bugs

Here's Why You Should Eat Bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Sarah Han munches on bugs

An orange light illuminated the inside of the oven, and through the
oven window I could see hundreds of wriggling mealworm bodies. I tried
to look away before ...
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Rosanna Yau of MiniLivestock invited me to her Lower Haight apartment to help her prepare mealworm granola bars, a recipe she was testing for a class project on branding at California College of the Arts. The 27-year-old artist wanted to see how branding can be used as a tool to redefine a feared practice like entomophagy, or insect eating. For part of this project, she will provide several students with kits to rear, harvest, and eventually prepare and eat mealworms."

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Solving the Global Food Crisis – Agriculture’s Amazing Future!

Solving the Global Food Crisis – Agriculture’s Amazing Future! | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
What the next generation will eat is one of the biggest unanswered questions facing mankind.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Scientists believe they have a solution to the food crisis, but it may mean changing your taste buds. Some forecast that mankind will be trading beef burgers, steaks and sausages for versions made from insects such as caterpillars, grasshoppers and dung beetles. Morgaine Gaye, a “food futurologist,” proposed changing the term “insects” to “mini-livestock” to make it more palatable for the masses (BBC).

This may seem like a foreign concept, but the Netherlands is already beginning to implement it: “The Dutch government is putting serious money into getting insects into mainstream diets. It recently invested one million euros…into research and to prepare legislation governing insect farms” (ibid.). But most throughout Western society are still too squeamish about replacing their cheeseburgers with “beetleburgers” and would not be fooled by the “mini-livestock” label."

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What will we be eating in 20 years' time?

What will we be eating in 20 years' time? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Why insect burgers could replace the hamburger on dinner plates.
Ana C. Day's insight:

It's a win-win situation. Insects provide as much nutritional value as ordinary meat and are a great source of protein, according to researchers at Wageningen University in the Netherlands. They also cost less to raise than cattle, consume less water and do not have much of a carbon footprint.

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Edible insects will replace meat as standard fare says researchers

Edible insects will replace meat as standard fare says researchers | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
DUTCH student Walinka van Tol inspects the worm protruding from a half-eaten chocolate praline she's holding, steels herself with a shrug, then pops it into her mouth.
Ana C. Day's insight:

According to professor Van Huis, about 500 types of insects are eaten in Mexico, 250 in Africa and 180 in China and other parts of Asia - mostly they are a delicacy.

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