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Every Student Deserves a Personalized Learning Plan

Every Student Deserves a Personalized Learning Plan | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it

All students can learn; however, not all students learn in the same way or at the same pace. Acknowledging this fact has driven the recent shift toward personalization in education.


In 2013, the state of Vermont committed itself to the value and promise that personalized learning holds for its students by passing Act 77, often referred to as the Flexible Pathways Initiative. The initiative requires every student in grades 7-12 to have a personalized learning plan—a document that guides each learner through a meaningful learning experience that leads to college and/or career readiness.


The concept of flexible pathways is what empowered Surdam to pursue her passion and enabled her to change course with ease. Vermont’s Agency of Education (AOE) defines flexible pathways as “any combination of high-quality academic and experiential components leading to secondary school completion and postsecondary readiness.” This doesn’t refer to a finite menu of pre-selected pathways from which a student must choose, but instead implies that there may be as many unique pathways as there are students, and that the possibilities are limited only by our imaginations and the resources available.


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6 Targets To Teach The Way The Brain Learns - TeachThought

6 Targets To Teach The Way The Brain Learns - TeachThought | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
When you’re standing in front of a classroom of students who’re not quite sure they even want to be in your class, much less pay attention to what’s being said, things like neuroscience, research studies, and teaching the way the brain learns are an abstraction.

Yet, brain-targeted teaching can engage and excite students because it taps into factors that stimulate the brain, grab the attention, and set the stage for learning.

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The Power of Empathy - Edutopia 

The Power of Empathy - Edutopia  | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it

"Empathy for others doesn’t necessarily lead them to change their behavior, but it does help you better navigate difficult situations. "


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Research every teacher should know about self-control and learning

In his series of articles on how psychology research can inform teaching, Bradley Busch picks an academic study and makes sense of it for the classroom. This time: research looking at self-control

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11 Ways to Make Learning Easier | Social Learning | #ModernLEARNing #SocialMedia #PLN #PKM

11 Ways to Make Learning Easier | Social Learning | #ModernLEARNing #SocialMedia #PLN #PKM | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
Learning doesn't have to be a "loner" experience.


Russian psychologist Lev Vygotsky suggested that knowledge is constructed through our interactions with others.
MOOCs (Massive Open Online Learning) leverage our inherent social needs by bringing people together to learn the same material in a virtual group. Students can express what they're feeling and experiencing with others in a shared space, making the learning journey more enjoyable and less daunting.

 

As people gain confidence, they often enjoy friendly competition with fellow learners to push themselves to compete exercises and assignments. Recognition is part of our need for building self-esteem—and some courses have gamification built in to reward student accomplishments and community helpfulness.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Social+Learning

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 12, 11:33 PM
Learning doesn't have to be a "loner" experience.


Russian psychologist Lev Vygotsky suggested that knowledge is constructed through our interactions with others.
MOOCs (Massive Open Online Learning) leverage our inherent social needs by bringing people together to learn the same material in a virtual group. Students can express what they're feeling and experiencing with others in a shared space, making the learning journey more enjoyable and less daunting.

 

As people gain confidence, they often enjoy friendly competition with fellow learners to push themselves to compete exercises and assignments. Recognition is part of our need for building self-esteem—and some courses have gamification built in to reward student accomplishments and community helpfulness.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Social+Learning

 

Doug Reid's curator insight, February 13, 6:23 AM

This is an interesting intro to social constructionism as it applies to eLearning.  I hope the MOOCs do what they suggest and are not just an attempt to throw jargon out there.

Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, February 15, 11:02 AM
Laat je niet overdonderen door het feit dat het er elf zijn. Van zodra je er enkele uitkiest en toepast kun je (leer)winst boeken. 
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8 Ways to Encourage Family Engagement in Secondary Schools | Edutopia

8 Ways to Encourage Family Engagement in Secondary Schools | Edutopia | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
When a school makes the decision to actively engage its diverse community of families, the benefits far outweigh the effort. Check out these eight ways to do it.

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5 Ways to Learn Anything Faster and Better, According to Science

Learning is the core foundation of personal growth, and it’s a habit that everyone should make time for to achieve improvement in every aspect of one’s life.

But during a busy workweek, how does one actually learn while their brain is being pulled in a million different directions?

Thankfully, because of its importance, various studies have been conducted to find out how people can maximize and improve the way they engage into their learning habits.

Thanks to science, there are newly discovered effective ways on how you can make the most out of learning, making it an enjoyable daily habit for continuous self-improvement.

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The Best Ways to use Video in Class

The Best Ways to use Video in Class | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
Jason Griffith, Ken Halla, Dr. Rebecca Alber, Jennie Farnell, Cheryl Mizerny, and Michele L. Haiken share their suggestions on how teachers can most effectively use video in the classroom.

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10 Questions Principals Should Ask Their Staff - Kara Knollmeyer

10 Questions Principals Should Ask Their Staff - Kara Knollmeyer | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
n my upcoming book, #UnleashTalent, a major element that I discuss is supporting your staff. Whether you are a principal, teacher, custodian, nurse, secretary, or superintendent, we must support each other as adults to support our kids. Everything trickles down. Happy and supported staff equal happy and supported students.

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Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, December 20, 2017 7:56 AM
Ik weet niet of ik ze elke week zou stellen. Maar dat deze vragen gesteld mogen (en moeten) worden tijdens het schooljaar, dat lijkt me wel. 
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How Do You Know When A Teaching Strategy Is Most Effective? John Hattie Has An Idea

How Do You Know When A Teaching Strategy Is Most Effective? John Hattie Has An Idea | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
Untangling education research can often feel overwhelming, which may be why many research-based practices take a long time to show up in real classrooms. It could also be one reason John Hattie’s work and book, Visible Learning, appeals to so many educators. Rather than focusing on one aspect of teaching, Hattie synthesizes education research done all over the world in a variety of settings into meta analyses, trying to understand what works in classrooms.

He has calculated the effect sizes of every teaching technique from outlining to project-based learning, which often tempts people to believe the strategies with low effect sizes don’t work and the ones with large effect sizes do. But Hattie — who is director of the Melbourne Educational Research Institute at the University of Melbourne — is the first to disavow this interpretation of his work. Instead, he and colleague Gregory Donoghue have developed a model of learning that proposes why different strategies may be effective at different stages of the learning cycle.

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D33ana Sumadianti's curator insight, December 12, 2017 2:50 AM
Skill, will and thrill in each learner. 
Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, January 9, 9:32 AM
Het blijft lonend om Hattie te volgen. 
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What Makes a Good Teacher?

What Makes a Good Teacher? | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
Many educators who succeed at raising test scores also fail at keeping students fulfilled, new research suggests.

 


Is a good teacher one who makes students enjoy class the most or one who is strict and has high standards? And are those two types even at odds?


A new study that tries to quantify this phenomenon finds that on average, teachers who are good at raising test scores are worse at making kids happy in class.


“Teachers who are skilled at improving students’ math achievement may do so in ways that make students less happy or less engaged in class,” writes University of Maryland’s David Blazar in the study, published in the peer-reviewed journal Education Finance and Policy.


The analysis doesn’t suggest that test scores are a poor measure of teacher quality, but does highlight the different ways teachers may be effective.


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Grupo 6's curator insight, December 9, 2017 4:30 PM
Reflexión Grupo 6:

Una vez leído el artículo, en el cual se recoge que un estudio reciente ha demostrado que los profesores que consiguen grandes puntuaciones para sus alumnos no logran hacer a estos felices, nos surge la pregunta: ¿Cómo podemos compensarlo? El artículo no señala que el resto de profesores sean malos o menos efectivos, pero ofrece la posibilidad de reflexionar sobre lo que sucede en las aulas. 

Es un hecho que los profesores tenemos un impacto en las actitudes y comportamientos de los alumnos. El hecho de que un alumno aprenda ha estado tradicionalmente ligado a recibir información por parte de un “experto” y digerir esa información para poseer el conocimiento necesario. Esto hace que el alumno tenga un papel muy pasivo y por tanto, se aburra. 

Sin embargo, actualmente contamos con cantidad de herramientas que hacen que el proceso de enseñanza y aprendizaje sea más dinámico y motivador para el alumno, con un papel activo en la construcción de su aprendizaje, favoreciendo la socialización al mismo tiempo. Esto es gracias a las TIC.

Las TIC tienen un gran elemento motivacional para los alumnos y proporcionan herramientas útiles para garantizar aprendizajes de calidad. Por ello, podemos integrarlas en el proceso de enseñanza y aprendizaje. Pero para tal fin, es necesario reformar muchas concepciones previas de este proceso de enseñanza y aprendizaje, así como planificar de forma muy clara cuales son los objetivos y metas que queremos que nuestros alumnos alcancen y os mejores caminos para ello. 

Tecnología y aprendizaje no pueden estar reñidos, es más, a nuestro parecer están condenados a entenderse, ya que ofrecen la clave para promover aprendizajes efectivos, de calidad, con una gran implicación por parte de los alumnos y promoviendo las ganas de aprender.
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The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know

The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
As education continues to evolve, adding in new trends, technologies, standards, and 21st century thinking habits, there is one constant that doesn’t change.

The human brain.

But neuroscience isn’t exactly accessible to most educators, rarely published, and when it is, it’s often full of odd phrasing and intimidating jargon. Worse, there seems to be a disconnect between the dry science of neurology, and the need teachers have for relevant tools, resources, and strategies in the classroom.

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Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, December 7, 2017 9:39 AM
Verrijk uw neurologisch-didactische vocabularium en spreek voortaan eenzelfde taal in uw team. 
Simon Vuillaume's curator insight, December 15, 2017 8:54 AM

The Neuroscience of Learning: 41 terms every teacher should know.... As well as trainers and instructional designers ... Here are my top 17:

- Affective filter

- Cognition

- Dopamine

- Executive Functions

- Hippocampus

- Limbic System

- Long-Term Memory

- Metacognition

- Neuronal Circuits

- Neuroplasticity

- Numeracy

- Patterning

- Prediction

- Prefrontal Cortex

- Rote Memory

- Serotonin

- Short-Term Memory (working memory)

Don't forget to take care of your brain !

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8 Strategies To Help Students Ask Great Questions

8 Strategies To Help Students Ask Great Questions | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it

Questions can be extraordinary learning tools.

A good question can open minds, shift paradigms, and force the uncomfortable but transformational cognitive dissonance that can help create thinkers. In education, we tend to value a student’s ability to answer our questions. But what might be more important is their ability to ask their own great questions–and more critically, their willingness to do so.

The latter is a topic for another day, but the former is why we’re here. This is part 2 of a short series (can two articles be considered a series?) built around the idea of questions as learning tools. Part 1  “A Guide For Questioning In The Classroom.”

 

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When a Rubric Isn’t Enough

When a Rubric Isn’t Enough | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
THE NEED FOR SCAFFOLDING
My school partners with Mills Teacher Scholars, a professional learning organization that facilitates collaborative inquiry for educators. In working with Mills, I was focusing my inquiry project on finding the appropriate level of scaffolding: Too much scaffolding and students all write the same thing, too little and they engage in off-task behaviors or produce work that doesn’t make sense.

I wondered if my students’ uncertainty around my learning expectations prevented them from fully engaging in learning tasks. If they more clearly understood my expectations, would they more competently and confidently explain their ideas? How could I find the right balance in scaffolding my students’ learning?

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What is the Biggest Barrier to Achieving Instructional Leadership?

What is the Biggest Barrier to Achieving Instructional Leadership? | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
The goal for principals is to spend a majority of their time in the role of instructional leader, and help those around them reach their full potential. That should always be the goal. However, there are so many facets to leadership that those same principals have to be in the role of manager as well. After all, if a school boiler is down in the middle of winter and it's 20 degrees outside, the principal in charge has to deal with that before they can continue going into classrooms to focus on learning.

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Teachers Observing Their Peers: Compliance is not Engagement

Teachers Observing Their Peers: Compliance is not Engagement | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
Peer observations are a great way for teachers to reflect on their instructional practices as well as build a culture of collaboration among staff members. Here are a few guidelines to consider before embarking on classroom observations.
Have a clear lens of focus before entering the classroom. Before entering classrooms have a specific area you are looking to observe. Whether it’s student engagement, classroom setup, or opening or closing procedures, have an idea of what you are looking for beforehand so that you can focus and not grow distracted by all the moving parts in a classroom.

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Why Playing is Essential to Achieving Effective Learning

Why Playing is Essential to Achieving Effective Learning | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it

Learning should be fun! Here's why the idea of play in achieving effective learning should be a fundamental consideration for educators of all subjects and grade levels.

 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 14, 7:55 AM
Learning should be fun! Here's why the idea of play in achieving effective learning should be a fundamental consideration for educators of all subjects and grade levels.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Effective+Learning

 

Ricard Garcia's curator insight, February 14, 11:58 AM
Always important to reflect on the need to incorporate play in learning processes, regardless of the students' age
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 15, 9:51 AM
Effective Learning
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8 Ways to Encourage Family Engagement in Secondary Schools | Edutopia

8 Ways to Encourage Family Engagement in Secondary Schools | Edutopia | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
When a school makes the decision to actively engage its diverse community of families, the benefits far outweigh the effort. Check out these eight ways to do it.

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6 Types Of Assessment Of Learning TeachThought

6 Types Of Assessment Of Learning TeachThought | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
If curriculum is the what of teaching, and learning models are the how, assessment is the puzzled “Hmmmm”–as in, I assumed this and this about student learning, but after giving this assessment, well….”Hmmmmm.”

So what are the different types of assessment of learning? This graphic below from McGraw Hill offers up six forms; the next time someone says “assessment,’ you can say “Which type, and what are we doing with the data?” like the TeachThought educator you are.

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5 Questions Every Kid Is Trying to Answer @davidguerin

5 Questions Every Kid Is Trying to Answer @davidguerin | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
When we think about creating a stronger school culture, we know how important it is to focus on relationships. But why are relationships such an important part of an outstanding learning environment? It seems clear when you think about it. Everyone needs to feel connected. Everyone needs to feel like he or she matters.1 

Everyone needs to matter!

All. Of. Us.

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This is what happens when you stop speaking your native language

This is what happens when you stop speaking your native language | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
Science suggests that though people struggle to remember their native language, they never really lose it.

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, December 22, 2017 8:07 PM
It doesn't. When I am immersed in a French speaking setting for a few days, it comes back slowly but surely.
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It's Not How Long You Spend in PD, It's How Much You Grow

It's Not How Long You Spend in PD, It's How Much You Grow | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
The research is clear: The “sit ‘n’ get” model of professional development doesn’t work.
Yet the majority of states continue to base the requirements for maintaining a teaching license on clock hours or seat time. And very often that looks like teachers heading en masse to one-off conferences and seminars, disconnected from their everyday classroom work.

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Classroom Management Resources

Classroom Management Resources | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
Here are some of the best articles I’ve written on the topic that have appeared in various publications:
Teacher: What happened when my students’ behavior took a ‘major turn for the worse’
Why Viewing Classroom Management as a Mystery Can Be a Good Thing
Teacher: How my 9th graders graded me
Cultivating a Positive Environment for Students
Positive, Not Punitive, Classroom Management Tips
More Positive, Not Punitive, Classroom Management Tips
A “Good” Class Gone “Bad”…And Back To “Good” Again
Five Guidelines For Effective Classroom Management

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When Will We Get Serious about Teacher Stress? – Ideas and Thoughts - Dean Shareski @shareski

When Will We Get Serious about Teacher Stress? – Ideas and Thoughts - Dean Shareski @shareski | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
I’m privileged to work with some of the very best educators around the world. I’m continually inspired and in awe of their expertise, energy and commitment to their craft. They are true artists.  I marvel at these artists and the different ways they approach teaching and learning.

Of late, I’ve become acutely aware of one sad commonality among these very good people. Teachers are stressed. One could argue teachers have always been stressed but I’m sensing something new and disturbing. Today’s headline confirms some of my hunches. I’m sure some will read this article and suggest teachers are weak or lazy or manipulative. However, it’s the increase that needs to be noted. Perhaps teachers are taking better care of themselves and thus are taking time to recover rather than bringing their sickness back to the classroom. If that’s the case I see a problem in a job that requires employees to take that much time off.

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Professional Learning That Inspires Change

Professional Learning That Inspires  Change | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it

Cultivate a Shared Vision


Creating a graduate profile with clear outcomes that the community values is a great way to anchor conversations about teaching and learning in desired outcomes for learners. When a learning community is clear on the purpose, the conversations about strategies, resources, and expectations are grounded in what and how to achieve desired outcomes for students—not program mandates that may or may not be best for the learners in your unique context. When I was working at the University of San Diego, We developed a model to help districts think about the desired competencies that they seek to develop in their students. It’s not meant to be adopted as is, but to inspire conversations, based in research, about the desired student outcomes in your community.


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