ENS1.6 Aboriginal Relationship to the Land and Ways of Caring for the Land
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World Environment Day - Raise Your Voice, Not the Sea Level

World Environment Day - Raise Your Voice, Not the Sea Level | ENS1.6 Aboriginal Relationship to the Land and Ways of Caring for the Land | Scoop.it

World Environment Day is held on June 5th annually to raise awareness and action for the environment. It is supported by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).

Angela Huang's insight:

This website is an excellent resource for teachers to consider when your class is studying the 'Environment' topic other than that it is an excellent idea that can be incorporated into schools to further promote caring for the environment. World Environment Day aims to join forces with schools, groups and organisations around the globe to raise awareness and action to save the environment for the future. For this purposeful day, groups and organisations contribute in a variety of ways such as creating a concert/or a gathering, composing musical pieces and more. The website provides a few examples of events and things made for the day from around the globe providing a global perspective of how the environment is seen around the world. The UNEP has provided a range of ways to be inclusive of everyone to partake in this purposeful day. Teachers can get their school involved in this event simply by registering their activity on the website. Involvement in this event will reassure students the importance of caring for the environment and attain student engagement because it is a real experience rather than purely receiving information from texts and the internet. 

 

To assist students to gain a global perspective of Aboriginal people and ways of caring for the land, using the interactive whiteboard students will look at images of another group of Aboriginal people from another country (Inuit people of Canada) and compare how they lived within the land and cared for the land compared to the Aboriginal people of Australia. This website provides excellent information about the Inuit people and ways they lived to survive the cold (http://firstpeoplesofcanada.com/fp_groups/fp_inuit2.html). Create a differences and similarities list on the whiteboard to identify how both groups cared for their land as the environments are significantly different. 

 

As said above, this event is purposeful for the world and incorporating into schools is highly recommended however this may be difficult in certain situations. To be involved, students can create a short film with the teachers assistance about why people should care for and protect the lands and environment. This is an excellent task that can highly engage students to step into the roles of Aboriginal people and further their experiences about the topic. According to Ewing & Simons (2004), "Drama in education is both a method of teaching/learning and a body of knowledge in its own right. Essentially its about enactment: using the body in time and space to explore issues, questions, perspectives and ideas". From this task, students step into the shoes of different people and possibly allow them to view issues and perspectives from different angles. 

 

Ewing, R. & Simons, J. (2004). Beyond the script: Drama in the classroom. Take 2. 2nd ed. Sydney: PETA. 

 

Goldi Productions. (2007). Canada's first people. Retrieved April 5, 2014 from http://firstpeoplesofcanada.com/fp_groups/fp_inuit2.html

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Changes to the Environment

Changes to the Environment | ENS1.6 Aboriginal Relationship to the Land and Ways of Caring for the Land | Scoop.it

'Window' by Jeannie Baker. 

Angela Huang's insight:

'Window' by Jeannie Baker is a excellent resource that can be used in the classroom for students to comprehend the significance of caring for the environment although it can also be used in relation to many other big topics in the curriculum. The picture book is wordless and depicts meaning through the detailed visuals. The story revolves around a family with a newborn that lives in an area that is filled with nature. The story progresses with the newborn growing up surrounded by the beautiful nature, but slowly the nature is replaced by houses and shops of the expanding community. Lastly, the once newborn is a grown-up and holding a baby looking out the window where the land is filled with trees and animals again. 

 

In the classroom, teachers can introduce the picture book to students  and have them closely look at the images to determine a storyline of their own. This youtube video is an excellent example, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F1Q9ml0PLGg. Then, looking at the bigger picture discuss with students what the author might be trying to tell readers from the story - in this case lead into 'caring for the land/environment'. Students will then brainstorm about things they do personally at home, school or other places to help care for the land. To reflect on their learning, students can create a simple brochure in groups to promote different ways that individuals can care for the land. As suggested by Gilbert and Hoepper (2011), student learning is successful when learning experiences are closely related to students' context of use to facilitate their application in daily situations beyond school. This activity is able to influence students different ways of caring for the land in general of our country instead of specifically focusing on particular lands. This activity is applicable to the outcome ENS1.6 where students suggests  ways of caring for sites, features, places and environments to which they can contribute. 

 

Lachlan Hartung. (October 31, 2013). Sustainability Jeannie Baker. Retrieved 1 April, 2014 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F1Q9ml0PLGg

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. Victoria: Cengage Learning

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What is Aboriginal People's Relationship with the land? How might they feel towards the land?

What is Aboriginal People's Relationship with the land? How might they feel towards the land? | ENS1.6 Aboriginal Relationship to the Land and Ways of Caring for the Land | Scoop.it

'Why I Love Australia' by Bronwyn Bancroft

Angela Huang's insight:

The picture book, 'Why I love Australia' is written and illustrated by Bronwyn Bancroft who is a descendant of the Bundjalung people of northern New South Wales. Through this visually rich text, Bronwyn has strongly depicted her connection to the landscapes of Australia that has been influenced by her cultural background. The book reflects to audiences that Aboriginal people have a deep relationship with the nature that surrounds them through traditional, physical, spiritual and cultural aspects. The use of text in the book has also been carefully chosen to emphasise the passion the author has for the land as she describes it to be quite 'royal' and 'gentle'.

 

This picture book is an excellent resource that can be used in the classroom as a stimulus for students to consider how and why Aboriginal people have such a strong connection with the land by closely analysing the vibrant visual images that are used, and also consider how Aboriginal people might have emotionally felt about the lands. Students can then think about their favourite place that they are connected to and consider how they might feel towards this place which they will 'Think, Pair and Share' with another student. Coming together, the class makes a list on the board about emotions that are possibly felt by the Aboriginal people from their personal experiences. Finally, they will write a description about their favourite place where they can include how they feel and how they found it. These activities are directly applicable to the outcome ENS1.5 where students expresses feelings for particular environments and why they have these feelings. According to Winch et al. (2010) writing is a great collector of ideas and also a clarifier of thinking that can further student learning because they become aware of the information they are writing down that supports them learn to be selective of what information is most appropriate that reflects their thinking and personality. Through this idea, students are continuously re-organising their ideas to make explicit meaning. 

 

Another activity can involve the students creating an artwork of their favourite place on paper and then using paint to create a variety of Aboriginal patterns on it. This activity enables students to compare how the society has changed from earlier time periods and also recognise that Aboriginal people have a special relationship with the land (ENS1.5). For example, Aboriginal people loved the natural environment, and in contrast the young generation today are steered away from the nature by electrical devices. The artwork will juxtapose the different times of society and allow students to recognise that people from other cultures interact with the land differently. 

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdah, L., & Holiday, M. (2010). Literacy: reading, writing and children's literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

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Discovering the Aboriginal Lifestyle in the Nature

Discovering the Aboriginal Lifestyle in the Nature | ENS1.6 Aboriginal Relationship to the Land and Ways of Caring for the Land | Scoop.it

'Our Local Place' excursion is designed for stage one students to discover how Aboriginal people lived in and with the bush through interactive games and activities. 

Angela Huang's insight:

The 'Our Local Place' excursion is a precious experience that young students are able to attend to physically understand how Aboriginal people lived in and with the bush. Realistic experiences are extremely important for students' learning throughout school. This excursion will allow students to experience and understand how Aboriginal people lived within the bush without any type of modern appliances that they may come across daily. (Program information: http://gibberagongeec.nsw.edu.au/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/S1OurLocalPlace.pdf)

 

From the excursion, teachers can prompt a discussion after about what students may have learnt from the excursion and any impressions they may have (e.g. ways of protecting natural environments), and ideas will be written on a big butchers paper spread across the whiteboard allowing for students to engage in active talk to review their excursion. This can also lead to having students write a description about their experiences at the excursion and what they had learnt about Aboriginal people and the land, this will allow teachers to assess the level of knowledge and what content may need to be taught next. Reflection writing for students is extremely significant as they revisit concepts and ideas that are new to them and break up the ideas to make meaning in their own way (CUS1.3, CUS1.4, ENS1.6). 

 

In groups, students can create a poster in any way using visuals and words to describe their understanding of Aboriginal people's relationship to the land (ENS1.6), for example a collage or a information poster. The activity gives students the opportunity to expand their knowledge and ideas with other students as well allowing the teacher to assess their understanding of the topic. 

 

The Royal Botanic Gardens also hold similar education programs/excursions for schools: http://www.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/

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What Kind of Practices do Aboriginal People follow in relation to the land?

What Kind of Practices do Aboriginal People follow in relation to the land? | ENS1.6 Aboriginal Relationship to the Land and Ways of Caring for the Land | Scoop.it

My Place: Yolgnu Country is a series profiling the people and the places in the north-east Arnhem land, explaining the Yolgnu way with the land, and how it teaches you. 

Angela Huang's insight:

In the video, 'My Place 10' stars Djawa Yunupingu who is a descendent of the Yolgnu Country. In the video, he explains to audiences that all nature have a story embedded within them that are passed on from generation to generation to educate them about the importance that is held by the land to their tradition of sharing knowledge, culture and beliefs. 

 

The series is by produced by National Indigenous Television (NITV), they are a not for profit public company providing a nationwide Indigenous television. This is a suitable resource portrayed from an Indigenous perspective for students that allows them to easily identify some of the practices that are taken on by the Aboriginal people daily simply by watching the video (CUS1.3, CUS1.4, ENS1.6). The site also provides other videos from the series that provide other perspectives from more Yolgnu members about resources that are made from bush materials and way of life. 

 

Using the video as a stimulus, brainstorm on the whiteboard with students thinking about why Aboriginal people have a strong connection with the land (e.g. they lived in the bush, their utensils are made out of resources from the bush). Then show students several appropriate images that are inclusive of Aboriginal people connecting with the land which they can use as a stimulus to write a respectful narrative. For example, using this image (http://s.ngm.com/2013/06/aboriginal-australians/img/aboriginal-girl-arnhem-land-wading-615.jpg) students can write a narrative in the point of view of the Aboriginal person in the image in relation to their connection to the land. According to Winch et al. (2010), when children begin to write different types of learning are occurring as they are experimenting with their ideas, words and their creativity to create meaning. Creative writing is a significant strategy to truly identify student learning through gathering knowledge and re-organising them into an interactive and engaging source. 

 

National Geographic. (2013). Australia's Aboriginals. Retrieved April 5, 2014 from http://s.ngm.com/2013/06/aboriginal-australians/img/aboriginal-girl-arnhem-land-wading-615.jpg/

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdah, L., & Holiday, M. (2010). Literacy: reading, writing and children's literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

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