ENS1.6 Relationships with places- care of resources
66 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rebecca Luu
Scoop.it!

Indigenous perspective- Excursion

Indigenous perspective- Excursion | ENS1.6 Relationships with places- care of resources | Scoop.it
Primary Excursions
Rebecca Luu's insight:

When providing an indigenous perspective for students, it is important that the learning experience for students is genuine. It is therefore important when choosing Aboriginal resources to be discerning of what the source is and whether it is correctly aligned with Indigenous perspectives. In the Aboriginal education K-12 resource guide (2003), a resource with an Aboriginal perspective is one which recognises and values Aboriginal culture and identity, furthermore it places a context for Aboriginal culture within the Australian and global environment (p. 11).

 

The Gibberagong Environmental Education Centre offers a range of excursions for students to ‘experience and connect with the natural world and encourage the development of positive behaviour changes towards its protection’ (Gibberagong, 2014). The program relevant to the content of stage 1 HSIE is called ‘Our Local Place’. The excursion brings students into the Ku-ring-gai Chase national park to explore local history, flora and fauna. This excursion has an Indigenous perspective as they intentionally explain to students how the original owners of the land, the Guringai people related to the bush and lived in it. This is useful in teaching this outcome as students can be immersed in the natural culture and be taught firsthand how Indigenous Australians have a connection to the land through shelter caves and engravings.

 

It would be important as the teacher to prepare students before going on an excursion like this. Students require the basic knowledge and facts prior to the learning experience so they can make meaning and connections of content. The curriculum support from the NSW Board of studies provides a support document for teachers teaching about Aboriginal connections to land which can be found on http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/primary/hsie/assets/pdf/caring/caringplace.pdf.  Upon evaluating this resource, it is important to know that the resource has been produced through consultation with Indigenous people and states acknowledgement to Aboriginal elders who have contributed to the resource. This is one of the key points stated in the Aboriginal education resource guide (2003, pp. 16-17)  

 

Gibberagong EEC (2014). Our local place. Retrieved April 1, 2014 from http://gibberagongeec.nsw.edu.au/wpcontent/uploads/2014/03/S1OurLocalPlace.pdf

NSW Department of Education and Training. (2003). Aboriginal education K-12 resource guide. NSW: Aboriginal studies team.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rebecca Luu
Scoop.it!

Global perspectives: Poster

Global perspectives: Poster | ENS1.6 Relationships with places- care of resources | Scoop.it
Rebecca Luu's insight:

This resource would be useful for both students and teachers when teaching the ENS1.6 dot point which is about caring for resources including waste. This poster develops student’s global perspective as it is a spring board to allowing students to see the journey of waste. The poster shows how the neglect and lack of care for the environment can impact an array of different relationships in the environment. The poster shows a cause and effect and the impacts on the environment both locally and globally. Students could use this to identify how the right/ wrong disposal of waste and care of resources affect different parts of the environment.  

 

When teaching HSIE through critical inquiry approach, it is important to allow students to ask questions in order to form their own understanding. The poster can be used as a stimulus for students to think through the effects of poor waste management and neglecting the use of resources. According to Hoepper (2011), teachers can have a ‘critical’ orientation to curriculum which is the assumption that by encouraging students to think through values and practices which are unsustainable, students can take action to better the environment (p. 51). This poster poses many issues to students through which they can consider and come up with a more sustainable way of waste disposal which is environmentally friendly.

 

This poster can be enlarged and displayed on the smart board for students to view. Posters like this one are useful when introducing a new topic as they can start to stimulate discussion as a class (Marsh, 2010, p. 241). The discussion can be further developed by allowing students to organise discussion points and questions about the topic in a table format. At the end of the unit, the class could collectively revisit the table with the discussion points and questions to analyse and compare an increased understanding on the topic and fill in any gaps in understanding which were initially brought up. This method is helpful for teachers when evaluating student learning as students are able to report back what they have learnt over a period of time and this is comparable with evidence in the table.

 

Hoepper, B. (2011). Critical inquiry into society and environment: The big picture. In R. Gilbert & B. Hoepper (Ed), Teaching society and environment (pp. 44-61). Victoria: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

Marsh, C. (2010). Becoming a teacher: knowledge, skills and issues. Frenchs Forest: Pearson Australia. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rebecca Luu
Scoop.it!

Resource for teachers: Lesson plan

Rebecca Luu's insight:

This is a useful teacher resource for stage 1 students. This resource aligns well with the syllabus as it has a well rounded approach by introducing the topic and guiding students through a series of explorative activities where students can critically learn and understand how the topic relates to them. For the teacher, the website itself provides a range of factsheets as well as embedded background information throughout the lesson plan. The lesson plan is user friendly and coherent making it easily accessible by the teacher.

 

 The lesson plans and ideas provide teachers with effective activities to teach students about recycling with the broader focus on saving resources. These activities may be taken straight from the lesson plan or adapted to suit the context of the class. Most of the activities suggested are hands on or require group work which is a useful way for collaborating and learning new information. As suggested by Vygotsky, there is great learning potential through cooperative group work when problem solving is done in collaboration with peers (Slavin, 1995). Students can combine their knowledge to the knowledge of others to create a more succinct bank of knowledge and understanding.  The activities are effective because they flow on from one activity to another like a unit of work. A teacher could use this lesson plan and teach it over several lessons.

 

There are many ways in which this lesson plan could be used as assessment. The lesson plan works towards students creating a poster individually in response to what they have learnt about the effective use of resources. The teacher could use the poster as tangible evidence of student learning. By embedding a presentation of the poster in the lesson plan, there are cross curriculum references to English outcomes for students using effective presentation skills when presenting information in speaking and listening outcomes (BOS, 2012).

 

Finally, this set of lesson activities seeks to encourage students to think about their actions and to then be moved to sharing their knowledge with others in the school. 

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2012). NSW Syllabuses for the Australian Curriculum: English K-10. Sydney: Author

 

Slavin, R.E. (1995). Cooperative learning: theory, research, and practice. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rebecca Luu
Scoop.it!

Teaching resource- Smartboard Lesson

Teaching resource- Smartboard Lesson | ENS1.6 Relationships with places- care of resources | Scoop.it
This Smartboard lesson focuses on waste and recycling. In this activity students will look at common types of waste found at school and at home, and: How they can be disposed off; How quickly they break down and decompose;  Some interesting facts about each type of waste; and Different ways that waste can be reused. …
Rebecca Luu's insight:

For teachers who like to engage students using their smart board, this teaching resource can be downloaded directly to the computer and used straight away. The smart board lesson provides an interactive approach focusing on waste and recycling. The aim is for students to be aware of waste at school and in their own homes. This resource links into the curriculum outcome as students learn about how their individual actions affect the relationship with the environment. Furthermore, students learn about the elements of waste and the impact of waste in relation to the environment where it often ends up. For teachers intending to use this resource, it would be appropriate to use as part of introductory lessons to the syllabus outcome. The activities such as sorting waste into ‘general’ and ‘recycling’ are useful ways of understanding the knowledge that your students already have about the topic. This can help to shape future lessons as according to Piaget’s theory of cognitive development, teachers should provide learning experiences which match the respective abilities of their students and allow students to be challenged by their thinking (Marsh, 2010, p. 43).

 

The website ‘coolaustralia.org’ has a range of other curriculum materials which are organised by stages making it easy to look through and choose relevant activities. Teachers can simply do a search and narrow it down to year level, topic and subject that they are looking for. The purpose of the website is for teachers to come together and share useful resources, knowledge, experiences and teaching tips.

 

What is also useful about this website is that there is a section about addressing Indigenous connections. This part of the website encourages schools to invite an expert into the classroom, the expert being an Indigenous elder or representative. The webpage provides a list of inquiry questions which teachers can use as a starting point for discussion prior to the visit. This can be accessed here: http://coolaustralia.org/take-action/indigenous-connections/. The organisation recognises the need for consultation before organising any incursion for students which is important in being respectful but also acknowledging the elders (NSW DEC, 2003, p. 10).

 

Teachers can access this website by joining up at no cost. Joining up allows teachers to access more than just smart board lessons but also related worksheets.

 

Marsh, C. (2010). Becoming a teacher: knowledge, skills and issues. Frenchs Forest: Pearson Australia.

NSW Department of Education and Training. (2003). Aboriginal education K-12 resource guide. NSW: Aboriginal studies team.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rebecca Luu
Scoop.it!

Resource for students: Waste collection game

Resource for students: Waste collection game | ENS1.6 Relationships with places- care of resources | Scoop.it
Rebecca Luu's insight:

The clean up Australia website provides a range of teaching and learning resources for both teachers and students. This interactive game is an example of a resource for students where they can identify waste and evaluate the need to care for resources. This resource allows students/teachers to pick their stage and state which then loads the appropriate educational content for the chosen context. As students play and go through ‘check points’ in the game, new facts about waste and caring for the environment appear for students to read. The wording is simple enough so that students in stage 1 are able to understand it. 

 

The aim of the game is for students to go down the river and 'collect' all the rubbish that is floating. The more you collect, the more points you gain. The game promotes active community involvement in participating in caring for the environment. This links in with clean up Australia day which is promoted on the website.

 

It is also part of the critical inquiry approach sequence to take and implement action and this can be covered as students can participate in clean up Australia day (Hoepper, 2011, p. 57). Clean up Australia, on a broader scale is about encouraging community involvement in cleaning up the local environment which contributes to the national clean up. The game is just a small element of the organisation which hopes promote awareness of waste and create responsible citizens. Schools can sign up to participate in the cleanup which becomes a whole school community focus and a follow up response to the game which is a simulation of clean up Australia day. Participating in the clean up helps to model responsible behaviour as citizens and demonstrates how small contributions can make big differences to the environment.

 

As a way of informal assessment, the game includes a short quiz at the end related to the content which has been shown to the student throughout the game. This activity could be used throughout the teaching of the outcome as revision on content being taught.

 

Hoepper, B. (2011). Critical inquiry into society and environment: The big picture. In R. Gilbert & B. Hoepper (Ed), Teaching society and environment (pp. 44-61). Victoria: Cengage Learning Australia.

more...
No comment yet.